<div dir="auto"><p>Dear MARMAM community,</p><p>We are please to announce the following paper about cetacean herpesvirus recently published in BMC Veterinary Research:</p><p>Ignacio Vargas-Castro, José Luis Crespo-Picazo, Belén Rivera-Arroyo, Rocío Sánchez, Vicente Marco-Cabedo, María Ángeles Jiménez-Martínez, Manena Fayos, Ángel Serdio, Daniel García-Párraga, José Manuel Sánchez-Vizcaíno. <b>Alpha- and gammaherpesviruses in stranded striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from Spain: first molecular detection of gammaherpesvirus infection in central nervous system of odontocetes. </b>BMC Vet Res 16, 288 (2020). <a href="https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-020-02511-3" rel="noreferrer noreferrer noreferrer" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-020-02511-3</a></p><p><br></p><p>Abstract:</p><h3 style="margin-top:0px;line-height:1.24;margin-bottom:8px"><span style="font-weight:normal">Background</span></h3><p style="padding:0px;margin:0px 0px 1.5em">Herpesvirus infections in cetaceans have always been attributed to the Alphaherpesvirinae and Gammaherpesvirinae subfamilies. To date, gammaherpesviruses have not been reported in the central nervous system of odontocetes.</p><h3 style="margin-top:0px;line-height:1.24;margin-bottom:8px"><span style="font-weight:normal">Case presentation</span></h3><p style="padding:0px;margin:0px 0px 1.5em">A mass stranding of 14 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) occurred in Cantabria (Spain) on 18th May 2019. Tissue samples were collected and tested for herpesvirus using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and for cetacean morbillivirus using reverse transcription-PCR. Cetacean morbillivirus was not detected in any of the animals, while gammaherpesvirus was detected in nine male and one female dolphins. Three of these males were coinfected by alphaherpesviruses. Alphaherpesvirus sequences were detected in the cerebrum, spinal cord and tracheobronchial lymph node, while gammaherpesvirus sequences were detected in the cerebrum, cerebellum, spinal cord, pharyngeal tonsils, mesenteric lymph node, tracheobronchial lymph node, lung, skin and penile mucosa. Macroscopic and histopathological post-mortem examinations did not unveil the potential cause of the mass stranding event or any evidence of severe infectious disease in the dolphins. The only observed lesions that may be associated with herpesvirus were three cases of balanitis and one penile papilloma.</p><h3 style="margin-top:0px;line-height:1.24;margin-bottom:8px"><span style="font-weight:normal">Conclusions</span></h3><p style="padding:0px;margin:0px 0px 1.5em">To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of gammaherpesvirus infection in the central nervous system of odontocete cetaceans. This raises new questions for future studies about how gammaherpesviruses reach the central nervous system and how infection manifests clinically.</p><p><br></p><p>Kind regards,</p><p>----------</p><p>Ignacio Vargas Castro</p><p>DMV, PhD student</p><p>Animal Health Department and VISAVET</p><p>Complutense University of Madrid</p><p><a href="mailto:ignavarg@ucm.es" rel="noreferrer noreferrer noreferrer noreferrer noreferrer noreferrer" target="_blank">ignavarg@ucm.es</a></p><p><br></p></div>