<div dir="ltr"><font face="times new roman, serif">My co-authors and I are pleased to announce our new publication entitled 'Seismic surveys reduce cetacean sightings across a large marine ecosystem' in <i>Scientific Reports.</i></font><div><i><font face="times new roman, serif"><br></font></i></div><div><div><font face="times new roman, serif">The paper is freely available</font></div><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin:0cm 0cm 8pt"><font face="times new roman, serif"><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-55500-4">https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-55500-4</a>  </font></p></div><div><font face="times new roman, serif"><span lang="SV" style=""><br></span></font></div><div><font face="times new roman, serif"><span lang="SV" style="">Kavanagh,<sup> </sup>A.S., </span><span lang="SV" style="">Nykänen,<sup> </sup>M.,
Hunt, W., Richardson,<sup> </sup>N.</span>, <span lang="SV" style="">Jessopp,<sup> </sup></span>M. </font></div><div><i><b><font face="times new roman, serif">Abstract:</font></b></i></div><div><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin:0cm 0cm 8pt"><font face="times new roman, serif"><span lang="EN-US">Noise pollution is increasing globally, and as
oceans are excellent conductors of sound, this is a major concern for marine
species reliant on sound for key life functions. Loud, impulsive sounds from
seismic surveys have been associated with impacts on many marine taxa including
mammals, crustaceans, cephalopods, and fish. However, impacts across large
spatial scales or multiple species are rarely considered. We modelled over
8,000 hours of cetacean survey data across a large marine ecosystem covering
><span style="color:black">880,000 km<sup>2</sup> </span>to investigate the
effect of seismic surveys on baleen and toothed whales. <a name="_Hlk15302924">We
found a significant effect of seismic activity across multiple species and
habitats, with an 88% (82–92%) decrease in sightings of baleen whales, and a
53% (41–63%) decrease in sightings of toothed whales during active seismic
surveys when compared to control surveys</a>.<a name="_Hlk15302941">
Significantly fewer sightings of toothed whales also occurred during active
versus inactive airgun periods of seismic surveys, although some
species-specific response to noise was observed. </a>This study provides strong
evidence </span><span style="color:black"><span style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial">of
multi-species impacts from seismic survey noise on </span></span><span style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial">cetaceans. </span><span lang="EN-US">Given the global proliferation of seismic surveys and large propagation
distances of airgun noise, <span style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial">our results
highlight the large-scale impacts that marine species are currently facing.</span></span>   </font></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin:0cm 0cm 8pt"><font face="times new roman, serif"><br></font></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin:0cm 0cm 8pt"><font face="times new roman, serif" style="">Contact: Ailbhe kavanagh (<a href="mailto:ailbheskavanagh@gmail.com">ailbheskavanagh@gmail.com</a>) or Mark Jessopp (<a href="mailto:m.jessopp@ucc.ie">m.jessopp@ucc.ie</a>)  </font></p></div></div>