<div dir="ltr"><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">Dear MARMAM colleagues,</div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">My co-authors and I are pleased to announce the publication of our literature review entitled,</div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">'An updated literature review examining the impacts of tourism on marine mammals over the last fifteen years (2000-2015) to inform research and management programs.' <br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><b>Abstract:</b></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">In 2000, Samuels et al. provided a comprehensive review of the scientific literature available at the time, which included 107 references related to the effects “swim-with dolphin” tours have on animals’ health and behavior. Over the last fifteen years, opportunities to view marine mammals in the wild have increased through commercial and private vessel-based platforms, in water “swim-with” activities, and land-based observation stations. Additionally, “structured” provisioning programs and illegal feeding interactions with a number of marine mammal species have increased. This current literature review updates and builds upon Samuels et al. 2000, by including almost 190 new references from 2000-2015 pertaining to swim-with activities, as well as vessel, land-based, and feeding interactions. The scope has also been expanded to include additional species of cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians. Our updated review highlights the major animal responses to viewing activities in four major themes: (1) behavior, (2) habitat use, (3) health, and (4) reproduction. Reoccurring responses documented in all four interaction themes include changes in animals’ behavioral budgets and ranging patterns, habitat displacement, avoidance behaviors, and reduced maternal care. Many studies highlighted the risks and effects associated with interactions, such as increased energetic demands, predation, acoustic disturbance, reduced juvenile survivorship, boat collision, and entanglement injuries. This updated literature review provides a comprehensive analysis of human-marine mammal interactions to date that can help guide future potential research projects and management strategies.<br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><b>Citation</b>: </div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">Machernis, Abigail, J.R. Powell, L.K. Engleby, and T.R. Spradlin, 2018. An Updated Literature Review Examining the Impacts of Tourism on Marine Mammals over the Last Fifteen Years (2000-2015) to Inform Research and Management Programs. U.S. Dept. of Commerce, NOAA. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SER-7:66 p.<br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">The full article is available online at:<span> </span><a href="https://repository.library.noaa.gov/view/noaa/18117" target="_blank" style="color:rgb(17,85,204)">https://repository.<wbr>library.noaa.gov/view/noaa/<wbr>18117</a></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">All the best,</div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">Abigail Machernis</div><br clear="all"><div><div class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><font color="#000080"><strong>Abigail Machernis<br> </strong></font><font color="#333399">Master of Environmental Management, 2014</font><font color="#333399"><br> Coastal Environmental Management </font><font color="#333399"><br> Nicholas School of the Environment | Duke University</font><font color="#333399"><br> </font><font color="#333399"><u><a href="mailto:abigail.machernis@duke.edu" target="_blank">abigail</a><a href="mailto:machernis@gmail.com" target="_blank">machernis@gmail.com</a></u></font><font color="#333399"><u><br> </u></font><font color="#333399">(908) 256-1626</font></div></div></div></div></div>
</div>