<div dir="ltr"><div>A colleague alerted me to this today... a predatory publisher has taken original articles from PLoS One, stripped the citations, and packaged them in a book entitled "An Integrated Study Of Marine Mammals".  Consequently, it looks like the citation for these papers is this fraudulent book.  The authors (at least the ones I know) were not contacted nor did they give permission.  The book is for sale at $107 a copy on Amazon (who I've contacted to make them aware of the issue); the publisher itself is charging $150 a copy.  Here's the publisher link... as you can see, they do this a lot:<br></div><div><br></div><div><a href="https://www.syrawoodpublishinghouse.com/homes/books_description?book_id=2128">https://www.syrawoodpublishinghouse.com/homes/books_description?book_id=2128</a></div><div><br></div><div>The "editor" of this volume appears to be completely fictitious.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Below is a listing of first authors and subjects from the 20 chapters of this book... if you've published in PLoS One lately, and you recognize the first authorship, there's a good chance you're in here.</div><div><br></div><div>Benoit-Bird: pelagic ecosystems<br></div><div>Meager: marine mammal mortality<br></div><div>Christensen: Recovery trends<br></div><div>Sterling: fur seal migration<br></div><div>Gowan: right whales<br></div><div>Baker: Predator-prey interactions</div><div>Braulik: Indus dolphin</div><div>Carroll: right whales and whaling</div><div>Double: Pygmy blue whales</div><div>Matthews: right whale monitoring</div><div>Apprill: humpback whale bacteria</div><div>Amaral: Clymene dolphin</div><div>McMahon: elephant seals</div><div>Schorr: Ziphius diving</div><div>Wilson: harbor seal foraging</div><div>Silva: Bayesian state-space models</div><div>Deng: sonar systems and marine mammals</div><div>Aguilar: Nitrogen stable isotopes</div><div>Peterson: PCB concentrations</div><div>Maniscalco: Steller sea lion natality</div><div><br></div><div>On a related and more humorous note, my dog recently succeeded in publishing a paper in a predatory journal, co-authored with another dog and a chicken:</div><div><br></div><div>A. Wünderlandt, O. Doll and G. Usalida.  2018.  Solicitation of patient consent for bilateral orchiectomy in male canids: Time to rethink the obligatory paradigm.  <i>Examines in Marine Biology and Oceanography</i> 2(1): 1-2,  doi:10.31031/EIMBO.2018.02.000528.</div><div><br></div><div>Reprint available on request...!</div><div><br></div>--<br><div><div><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div>Phillip J. Clapham, Ph.D.</div><div>Leader, Cetacean Assessment and Ecology Program</div><div>Marine Mammal Laboratory</div><div>Alaska Fisheries Science Center</div><div>7600 Sand Point Way NE</div><div>Seattle, WA 98115, USA</div><div><br></div><div>tel 206 526 4037<br></div><div>email <a href="mailto:phillip.clapham@noaa.gov" target="_blank">phillip.clapham@noaa.gov</a><br><br></div><br><br><br></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
</div></div>