<div dir="ltr"><div><div><br></div>Dear colleagues, <br><br></div>See below a link to a prepublished version of this paper, now in review in eLife, this version is freely available, <br><div><div><div><br><a href="https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/04/18/303743">https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/04/18/303743</a><br><br></div><div>This is the abstract:<br><br>
<div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">Animals   aggregate   to   obtain   a   range   of   fitness   benefits,   but   a   common   cost   of</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">aggregation is increased detection by predators. Here we show that, in contrast to visual</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">and chemical signallers, aggregated acoustic signallers need not face higher predator</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">encounter rate. This is the case for prey groups that synchronize vocal behaviour but</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">have negligible signal time-overlap in their vocalizations. Beaked whales tagged with</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">sound and movement loggers exemplify this scenario: they precisely synchronize group</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">vocal  and  diving  activity  but  produce  non-overlapping   short acoustic   cues.  They</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">combine this with acoustic hiding when within reach of eavesdropping predators to</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">effectively annul the cost of aggregation for predation risk from their main predator, the</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">killer whale. We generalize this finding in a mathematical model that predicts the key</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">parameters that social vocal prey, which are widespread across taxa and ecosystems,</div><div style="font-size:11.9597px;font-family:serif">can use to mitigate detection by eavesdropping predators.</div>

<br><br></div><div>Cheers, we hope you enjoy seeing the amazing coordinated behaviour of beaked whales!<br><br><br></div><div>Natacha <br><br>
<span><pre><span><pre>Natacha Aguilar de Soto, PhD<br>Research Fellow<br>BIOECOMAC (Marine Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation)
University of La Laguna
Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain
<a href="mailto:naguilar@ull.es" target="_blank">naguilar@ull.edu.es</a> / 922 318324-87 / 636876526<br><a href="http://cetaceos.webs.ull.es/bioecomac/" target="_blank">http://cetaceos.webs.ull.es/bioecomac/</a><br></pre></span><span><pre><span><pre>Visiting Scholar
Scottish Marine Institute.<br>UUniversity of St Andrews. Scotland. UK<br><a href="https://creem2.st-andrews.ac.uk/person/na30/" target="_blank">https://creem2.st-andrews.ac.uk/person/na30/</a><br></pre></span></pre></span> </pre></span>

<br></div></div></div></div>