<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
          "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html  xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en"><head>
<title></title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8"/>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Style-Type" content="text/css"/>
</head>
<body>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">SOCPROG is a set of programs for analyzing the social systems (as well as movements and 
populations) of animals.  It has been used often for cetacean studies.</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">A new and updated version of SOCPROG, SOCPROG2.6 (both compiled</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">and uncompiled downloads) is available at:</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">http://myweb.dal.ca/hwhitehe/social.htm.</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">This version includes new a network diagram drawing routine, and calculates and analyzes 
generalized affiliation indices, which I think may be of value to some users (see below). The 
new version is compatible with MATLAB2015a and also fixes a few bugs.</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">I hope this helps. Let me know about any problems that remain, or have been introduced.</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">Thanks</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">Hal</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">Hal Whitehead (hwhitehe@dal.ca)</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">Dalhousie University</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">Whitehead, H. and R. James. 2015. Generalized affiliation indices extract affiliations from 
social network data. </span><span style=" font-size:10pt"><i>Methods in Ecology and Evolution</i></span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">Available at: http://whitelab.biology.dal.ca/labpub.htm</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">Summary</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt"><br />
</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">1. In the analysis of animal social networks, a common challenge has been distinguishing 
affiliations - active preferences of pairs of individuals to interact or associate with one another 
- from other, structural, causes of association or interaction. Such structural factors can 
include patterns of use of the habitat in time and space, gregariousness and differential 
association rates among age/sex classes.</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">2. In an approach with similarities to the multiple regression quadratic assignment 
procedures test, we suggest calculating generalized affiliation indices as the residuals from a 
regression of the measures of association or interaction on structural predictor variables, 
such as gregariousness and spatiotemporal overlap. If the original data are association 
indices or counts of interactions, then generalized linear models with binomial or Poisson 
error structures, respectively, can be used in place of linear regression. Anscombe or 
deviance residuals can be used to assess the significance of particular affiliation indices.</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">3. Generalized affiliation indices can be used as the weights of links in a social network 
representation. They can then be portrayed in network diagrams or cluster diagrams and 
used to calculate network statistics, to delineate communities by maximizing modularity and 
to test for overall affiliation using data-stream permutation tests.</span></font></div>
<div align="left"><font face="Arial" size="2"><span style=" font-size:10pt">4. We evaluate the effectiveness of such generalized affiliation indices using simulated and 
real association data, finding that the method removes much of the effect of structural 
variables on association patterns, revealing real affiliations. While the approach is very 
promising, it is limited by the extent to which the input predictor variables represent important 
structural factors.</span></font></div>
</body>
</html>