<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    Dear MARMAM colleagues,
    <br>
    <br>
    We are pleased to announce a new publication in which we described a
    <br>
    new method for estimating the biomechanical parameters of swimming <br>
    strokes from tag data. This study reveals that beaked whales may
    increase<br>
     efficiency by switching gaits during different phases of deep
    dives.<br>
    <br>
    Martı́n López, L. M., Miller, P., Aguilar de Soto, N. and Johnson,
    M.
    <br>
    (2015). Gait switches in deepdiving
    <br>
    beaked whales: biomechanical strategies for long-duration dives. J.
    <br>
    Exp. Biol. 218, 1325-1338.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <b class="moz-txt-star"><span class="moz-txt-tag">*</span>Abstract<span
        class="moz-txt-tag">*</span></b>
    <br>
    Diving animals modulate their swimming gaits to promote locomotor
    <br>
    efficiency and so enable longer, more productive dives. Beaked
    whales
    <br>
    perform extremely long and deep foraging dives that probably exceed
    <br>
    aerobic capacities for some species. Here, we use biomechanical data
    <br>
    from suction-cup tags attached to three species of beaked whales
    <br>
    (Mesoplodon densirostris, N=10; Ziphius cavirostris, N=9; and
    <br>
    Hyperoodon ampullatus, N=2) to characterize their swimming gaits. In
    <br>
    addition to continuous stroking and strokeand- glide gaits described
    <br>
    for other diving mammals, all whales produced occasional
    fluke-strokes
    <br>
    with distinctly larger dorsoventral acceleration, which we termed
    <br>
    ‘type-B’ strokes. These high-power strokes occurred almost
    exclusively
    <br>
    during deep dive ascents as part of a novel mixed gait. To quantify
    <br>
    body rotations and specific acceleration generated during strokes we
    <br>
    adapted a kinematic method combining data from two sensors in the
    tag.
    <br>
    Body rotations estimated with high-rate magnetometer data were
    <br>
    subtracted from accelerometer data to estimate the resulting surge
    and
    <br>
    heave accelerations. Using this method, we show that stroke
    duration,
    <br>
    rotation angle and acceleration were bi-modal for these species,
    with
    <br>
    B-strokes having 76%of the duration, 52%larger body rotation and
    four
    <br>
    times more surge than normal strokes.  The additional acceleration
    of
    <br>
    B-strokes did not lead to faster ascents, but rather enabled brief
    <br>
    glides, which may improve the overall efficiency of this gait. Their
    <br>
    occurrence towards the end of long dives leads us to propose that
    <br>
    B-strokes may recruit fast-twitch fibres that comprise ∼80% of
    <br>
    swimming muscles in Blainville’s beaked whales, thus prolonging
    <br>
    foraging time at depth.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    The article can be found at:
    <br>
    <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
      href="http://jeb.biologists.org/content/218/9/1325.abstract">http://jeb.biologists.org/content/218/9/1325.abstract</a>
    <br>
    <br>
    Please contact for a PDF at:
    <br>
    <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated"
      href="mailto:lmml2@st-andrews.ac.uk">lmml2@st-andrews.ac.uk</a>
    <br>
    <br>
    Kind regards,
    <br>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
Lucía Martina Martín López,
PhD student
Sea Mammal Research Unit
Scottish Oceans Institute
University of St Andrews
KY16 8LB, Fife
Scotland, UK
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:lmml2@st-andrews.ac.uk">lmml2@st-andrews.ac.uk</a> 
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://soundtags.st-andrews.ac.uk/people/lucia-martin-lopez/">http://soundtags.st-andrews.ac.uk/people/lucia-martin-lopez/</a></pre>
  </body>
</html>