<div dir="ltr"><pre style="white-space:pre-wrap"><font face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:32px;white-space:normal">I am pleased to announce the publication of the following paper detailing the fine-scale</span></font><font face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:32px;white-space:normal"> movement of humpback whales </span></font><span style="line-height:32px;white-space:normal;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">satellite-tracked in the eastern Aleutian Islands and Bering Sea</span><span style="line-height:32px;white-space:normal;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">:</span></pre>

<pre><font face="Arial, Lucida Grande, Geneva, Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif" style="white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="line-height:15px;white-space:normal">Kennedy AS, Zerbini AN, Rone BK, Clapham PJ. </span></font><font face="Arial, Lucida Grande, Geneva, Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:15px;white-space:normal"> (2014). Individual variation in movements of satellite-tracked humpback whales (<i>Megaptera novaeangliae</i>) in the eastern Aleutian Islands and Bering Sea. Endangered Species Research, 23, 187-195.</span></font><span style="white-space:pre-wrap"><br>

<br></span></pre><pre><font face="arial, sans-serif" size="3"><span style="white-space:normal">
</span></font></pre><p></p><p class="MsoNormal"><font face="arial, sans-serif">ABSTRACT: Humpback whales utilize waters off the Aleutian Islands and Bering Sea as foraging</font></p><p class="MsoNormal"><font face="arial, sans-serif">grounds during summer months. Currently, the fine-scale movements of humpback whales within</font></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><font face="arial, sans-serif">these feeding grounds are poorly understood. In the summers of 2007 to 2011, 8 humpback whales </font><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">were tracked with satellite tags deployed near Unalaska Bay. Individuals were tracked for an </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">average of 28 d (range = 8−67 d). Three whales remained within 50 km of their tagging locations </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">for approximately 14 d, while 2 others explored areas near the northern shore of Unalaska Bay and </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">Unimak Pass. Two whales moved west: one traveled to the Island of Four Mountains and returned </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">to the northern side of Umnak Island, while the other moved through Umnak Pass and explored </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">feeding areas on both sides of Umnak Island. Remarkably, 1 individual left Unalaska Bay soon </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">after tagging and moved ~1500 km (in 12 d) along the outer Bering Sea shelf to the southern </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">Chukotka Peninsula, Russia, then east across the Bering Sea basin to Navarin Canyon, where it </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">remained until transmissions ceased. Most area-restricted search (i.e. foraging) was limited to </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">waters shallower than 1000 m, while movement into deeper water was often associated with travel </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">behavior. Tagged animals spent more time on the Bering Sea shelf and slope than the North </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">Pacific. Movement patterns show individual variation, but are likely influenced by seasonal productivity. </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">This study provides evidence that although humpbacks aggregate in well-known foraging </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif">areas, individuals may perform remarkably long trips during the feeding season.</span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><font face="arial, sans-serif"><br></font></p><p class="MsoNormal"><font face="arial, sans-serif">KEY WORDS: Humpback whale  Satellite telemetry  Aleutian Islands  Feeding ground  Movements</font></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><font face="arial, sans-serif"><br></font></p><p class="MsoNormal"><font face="arial, sans-serif">A pdf of this manuscript can be downloaded from the Endangered Species Research website: </font><font color="#1155cc" face="arial, sans-serif"><u><a href="http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/esr/v23/n2/p187-195/">http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/esr/v23/n2/p187-195/</a></u></font></p>

<div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">Cheers, </div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">Amy</div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">

<br></div><div><div dir="ltr"><div>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~</div><div>Amy S. Kennedy, Ph.D.</div><div>Cetacean Research Biologist</div><div>National Marine Mammal Laboratory</div><div>Alaska Fisheries Science Center</div>

<div>Seattle, WA 98115</div><div><br></div><div>tel (206) 526-4141</div><div>fax (206) 526-6615</div></div></div>
</div>