<div dir="ltr"><pre><font face="Arial, sans-serif" style="white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="line-height:32px;white-space:normal">I am pleased to announce the publication of the following paper detailing l</span></font><font face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:32px;white-space:normal">ocal and migratory movements of humpback whales </span></font><span style="line-height:32px;white-space:normal;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">satellite-tracked in the North </span><span style="line-height:32px;white-space:normal;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">Atlantic Ocean:</span></pre>

<pre><font face="Arial, Lucida Grande, Geneva, Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:15px;white-space:normal">Kennedy, A. S., A. N. Zerbini, et al. (2013). "Local and migratory movements of humpback whales (<i>Megaptera novaeangliae</i>) satellite-tracked in the North Atlantic Ocean." Canadian Journal of Zoology: 8-17</span></font><span style="white-space:pre-wrap"><br>

</span></pre><p style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"></p><p class="MsoNormal"><u style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:26px"><span style="font-family:Arial,sans-serif">ABSTRACT:</span></u><span style="font-family:Arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:26px">  </span><font face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:26px">North Atlantic humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski, 1781)) migrate from high-latitude summer feeding </span></font><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">grounds to low-latitude winter breeding grounds along the Antillean Island chain. In the winters and springs of 2008 through </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">2012, satellite tags were deployed on humpback whales on Silver Bank (Dominican Republic) and in Guadeloupe (French West </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">Indies) breeding areas. Whales were monitored, on average, for 26 days (range = 4–90 days). Some animals remained near their </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">tagging location for multiple days before beginning their northerly migration, yet some visited habitats along the northwestern </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">coast of the Dominican Republic, northern Haiti, the Turks and Caicos islands, and off Anguilla. Individuals monitored during </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">migration headed towards feeding grounds in the Gulf of Maine (USA), Canada, and the eastern North Atlantic (Iceland or </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">Norway). One individual traveled near Bermuda during the migration. This study provides the first detailed description of routes </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">used by North Atlantic humpback whales towards multiple feeding destinations. Additionally, it corroborates previous research </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">showing that individuals from multiple feeding grounds migrate to the Antilles for the breeding season. This study indicates that </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">North Atlantic humpbacks use an area broader than the existing boundaries of marine mammal sanctuaries, which should </span><span style="line-height:26px;font-family:Arial,sans-serif">provide justification for their expansion.</span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><font face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:26px">Key words: humpback whale, migration, satellite telemetry, North Atlantic, breeding ground, movements.</span></font></p><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">

<br></div><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">A pdf of this note can be downloaded from the Canadian Journal of Zoology website: </span><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"></span><a href="http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/cjz-2013-0161">http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/cjz-2013-0161</a><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">

<br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">Cheers, </div><div><div dir="ltr"><div>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~</div><div>Amy S. Kennedy, Ph.D.</div><div>Cetacean Research Biologist</div><div>
National Marine Mammal Laboratory</div>
<div>Alaska Fisheries Science Center</div><div>Seattle, WA 98115</div><div><br></div><div>tel (206) 526-4141</div><div>fax (206) 526-6615</div></div></div>
</div>