A new paper on Antarctic killer whales has been published in the Journal of Cetacean Research and Management:<div><br></div><div><div>Observations of killer whales off East Antarctica, 82-95E, in 2009. 2012. Olson, P.A., Ensor, P., and Kuningas, S. <i>J. Cetacean Res. Manage</i>. 12(1): 61-64.</div>
<div><br></div><div>ABSTRACT</div><div>Observations of killer whales (<i>Orcinus orca</i>) during a survey off east Antarctica, 082 - 095E revealed previously undescribed variations in pigmentation and group associations. During the survey 24 killer whale groups were sighted south of 60S and classified, when possible, to Types A, B, or C (Pitman and Ensor 2003) based on their external morphology. Sufficient observation was available for nine groups to be classified: 2 groups of Type A; 1 mixed group of Type A and Type B; 3 groups of Type C; and 3 groups with eyepatch pigmentation intermediate in size between Types B and C. These whales may represent an intergrade between Types B and C or a previously unrecognized form. One of the 'intermediate' groups was observed feeding in a multi-species aggregation with other cetaceans in deep water. Clearly distinguishable Type A and Type B whales were observed feeding together in a mixed aggregation, the first time that this has been documented.</div>
</div>