<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    MARMAM subscribers,<br>
    <br>
    We would like to bring to your attention the following recent
    publication:<br>
    <br>
    <big><big><b>A New Context-Based Approach to Assess Marine Mammal <br>
          Behavioral Responses to Anthropogenic Sounds</b></big></big><br>
    <br>
    <big><b>W.T. ELLISON, B.L. SOUTHALL, C.W. CLARK, AND A.S. FRANKEL</b></big><br>
    Conservation Biology, Volume **, No. *, 1–8<br>
    2011, Society for Conservation Biology<br>
    published online: DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01803.x<br>
    <br>
    The link to the full article is <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01803.x/full">http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01803.x/full</a>
    <br>
    The link to the abstract is <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01803.x/abstract">http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01803.x/abstract</a>
    <br>
           and the abstract text is given below:<br>
    <br>
    <u>Abstract</u>: Acute effects of anthropogenic sounds on marine
    mammals, such as from military sonars, energy<br>
    development, and offshore construction, have received considerable
    international attention from scientists,<br>
    regulators, and industry. Moreover, there has been increasing
    recognition and concern about the potential<br>
    chronic effects of human activities (e.g., shipping). It has been
    demonstrated that increases in human activity<br>
    and background noise can alter habitats of marine animals and
    potentially mask communications for species<br>
    that rely on sound to mate, feed, avoid predators, and navigate.
    Without exception, regulatory agencies<br>
    required to assess and manage the effects of noise on marine mammals
    have addressed only the acute effects<br>
    of noise on hearing and behavior. Furthermore, they have relied on a
    single exposure metric to assess acute<br>
    effects: the absolute sound level received by the animal. There is
    compelling evidence that factors other than<br>
    received sound level, including the activity state of animals
    exposed to different sounds, the nature and<br>
    novelty of a sound, and spatial relations between sound source and
    receiving animals (i.e., the exposure<br>
    context) strongly affect the probability of a behavioral response. A
    more comprehensive assessment method<br>
    is needed that accounts for the fact that multiple contextual
    factors can affect how animals respond to both<br>
    acute and chronic noise. We propose a three-part approach. The first
    includes measurement and evaluation<br>
    of context-based behavioral responses of marine mammals exposed to
    various sounds. The second includes<br>
    new assessment metrics that emphasize relative sound levels (i.e.,
    ratio of signal to background noise and<br>
    level above hearing threshold). The third considers the effects of
    chronic and acute noise exposure. All three<br>
    aspects of sound exposure (context, relative sound level, and
    chronic noise) mediate behavioral response, and<br>
    we suggest they be integrated into ecosystem-level management and
    the spatial planning of human offshore<br>
    activities.<br>
    <br>
    <u>Keywords</u>: behavioral context, noise, received level,
    signal-to-noise ratio<br>
    <br>
    Thanks and wishing everyone has a wonderful holidays,<br>
    William Ellison, Brandon Southall, Chris Clark, Adam Frankel<br>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">
Brandon L. Southall, Ph.D.
President, Senior Scientist, SEA, Inc.
Research Associate, University of California, Santa Cruz
9099 Soquel Drive, Suite 8, Aptos, CA 95003, USA
831.332.8744 (mobile); 831.661.5177 (office); 831.661.5178 (fax)
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Brandon.Southall@sea-inc.net">Brandon.Southall@sea-inc.net</a>; <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="http://www.sea-inc.net">www.sea-inc.net</a> 
</pre>
  </body>
</html>