<html><body><div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff; font-family:tahoma, new york, times, serif;font-size:8pt"><div><span>Dear MARMAMers,</span></div><div><br><span></span></div><div><span>The following paper has recently been published in the Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK:</span></div><div><br><span></span></div><div><span>Ruth H. Leeney, Matthew J. Witt, Annette C. Broderick, John Buchanan, Daniel S. Jarvis, Peter B. Richardson & Brendan J. Godley (2011) <br></span></div><div><span style="font-weight: bold;">Marine megavertebrates of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly: relative abundance and distribution</span><br><span></span></div><div><br><span></span></div><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span>ABSTRACT</span></div><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">We document patterns of distribution and relative abundance of marine megavertebrate fauna around Cornwall and the Isles</span><br
 style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">of Scilly from a combination of aerial and boat-based surveying. Between January 2006 and November 2007, 20 aerial surveys</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">were undertaken, comprising over 40 hours of on-effort flying time. In April to October of these years, 27 effort-corrected ferry</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">surveys were also conducted from a passenger ferry travelling between Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly. Opportunistic sightings</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">were also logged by the crew members of the ferry and another vessel travelling regularly along the same route on 155 days.</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">Ten megavertebrate species were sighted: basking sharks C</span><span>etorhinus
 maximu</span><span>s,</span><span style="font-style: italic;"> sunfish </span><span>Mola mola</span><span style="font-style: italic;">, common dolphins</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span>Delphinus delphis</span><span></span><span style="font-style: italic;">, harbour porpoise </span><span>Phocoena phocoena</span><span style="font-style: italic;">, grey seals </span><span>Halichoerus grypus,</span><span style="font-style: italic;"> Risso’s dolphins </span><span>Grampus</span><br><span>griseus</span><span style="font-style: italic;">, bottlenose dolphins T</span><span>ursiops truncatus</span><span style="font-style: italic;">, minke whales </span><span>Balaenoptera acutorostrata</span><span style="font-style: italic;">, long-finned pilot whales</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span>Globicephala melas</span><span style="font-style: italic;"> and killer whale </span><span>Orcinus orca</span><span style="font-style: italic;">. During aerial
 surveys, 206 sighting events of seven species were made,</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">compared with 145 sighting events of eight species during ferry surveys and 293 sighting events of 10 species from opportunistic</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">ship-board data collection efforts. Seasonal and spatial patterns in species occurrence were evident. Basking sharks were the</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">most commonly-sighted species in the region and were relatively abundant throughout the estimated 5 km-wide strip of</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">coastal waters covered by the aerial surveys, during spring and summer. Ferry surveys and opportunistic vessel-based sightings</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">data confirmed that the distribution of
 surface-feeding aggregations of this species was largely around the coasts. Despite the</span><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">limited scope of this study, it has provided valuable baseline data, and possible insights into the marine biodiversity of the region.</span><br></div><div><span></span></div><div><br><span></span></div><div><span>For pdfs of the main paper and Supplementary figures, please contact Ruth Leeney at ruleeney@yahoo.co.uk <br></span></div><div><br><span></span></div><div> </div><div style="font-family: tahoma,new york,times,serif;"><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 127);"><font size="1"><font size="2">- - -<br>Ruth H. Leeney<br></font></font></span></div><div><br><span></span></div><div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 127); font-size: 10px; font-family: tahoma,new york,times,serif; background-color: transparent; font-style: normal;"><span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 127);"><span style="font-family:
 tahoma,new york,times,serif;">Recherche et Conservation des Cétacés de Sénégal</span></span></span></div><div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 127); font-size: 10px; font-family: tahoma,new york,times,serif; background-color: transparent; font-style: normal;"><span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 127);"><span style="font-family: tahoma,new york,times,serif;"></span></span><br></span></div><div style="font-family: tahoma,new york,times,serif;"><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 127);"><font size="1"><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 191);"></span></font></span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 127);"><font size="1"><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 191); text-decoration: underline;">http://publicationslist.org/ruth.leeney </span><span style="text-decoration: underline; color: rgb(0, 0, 191);"><br></span></font></span><br><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></div></div></body></html>