<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">We are please to announce a new publication examining the potential conflict that may be emerging in the northeastern Pacific for southern resident killer whales (<em>Orcinus orca</em>) and their primary prey, Chinook salmon (<em>Oncorhynchus tshawytscha</em>).<div><br></div><div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Arial; ">Williams, R., M. <span class="citation_author">Krkošek</span>, E. Ashe, T.A. Branch, S. Clark, P.S. Hammond, E. Hoyt, D.P. Noren, D. Rosen and A. Winship. 2011. Competing Conservation Objectives for Predators and Prey: Estimating Killer Whale Prey Requirements for Chinook Salmon. PloS one 6: e26738.</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Arial; "><br></div><div>The publication is available on-line at:</div><div><div><a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0026738">http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0026738</a></div></div></div><div><br></div><div>ABSTRACT:</div><div>Ecosystem-based management (EBM) of marine resources attempts to 
conserve interacting species. In contrast to single-species fisheries 
management, EBM aims to identify and resolve conflicting objectives for 
different species. Such a conflict may be emerging in the northeastern 
Pacific for southern resident killer whales (<em>Orcinus orca</em>) and their primary prey, Chinook salmon (<em>Oncorhynchus tshawytscha</em>).
 Both species have at-risk conservation status and transboundary 
(Canada–US) ranges. We modeled individual killer whale prey requirements
 from feeding and growth records of captive killer whales and 
morphometric data from historic live-capture fishery and whaling records
 worldwide. The models, combined with caloric value of salmon, and 
demographic and diet data for wild killer whales, allow us to predict 
salmon quantities needed to maintain and recover this killer whale 
population, which numbered 87 individuals in 2009. Our analyses provide 
new information on cost of lactation and new parameter estimates for 
other killer whale populations globally. Prey requirements of southern 
resident killer whales are difficult to reconcile with fisheries and 
conservation objectives for Chinook salmon, because the number of fish 
required is large relative to annual returns and fishery catches. For 
instance, a U.S. recovery goal (2.3% annual population growth of killer 
whales over 28 years) implies a 75% increase in energetic requirements. 
Reducing salmon fisheries may serve as a temporary mitigation measure to
 allow time for management actions to improve salmon productivity to 
take effect. As ecosystem-based fishery management becomes more 
prevalent, trade-offs between conservation objectives for predators and 
prey will become increasingly necessary. Our approach offers scenarios 
to compare relative influence of various sources of uncertainty on the 
resulting consumption estimates to prioritise future research efforts, 
and a general approach for assessing the extent of conflict between 
conservation objectives for threatened or protected wildlife where the 
interaction between affected species can be quantified.</div></body></html>