<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
    <br>
    What is the potential for severely traumatized cetaceans to survive
    at sea? The question has been asked specifically about animals and
    groups released after strandings and entanglements, but here is
    directed to animals subjected to capture in shallow water, and
    released after other individuals in the group have been killed under
    permit. The question is relevant to meeting permit requirements
    where certain species are not to be killed: If they are captured
    with permitted species, subjected to the trauma and released will
    they survive or die? <br>
    <br>
    On 13 November 20 Risso's dolphins, <i>Grampus griseus</i>, and two
    rough toothed dolphins, <i>Steno bredanensis</i>, were driven out
    to sea after a nine-hour period where a still-unknown number of
    Risso's dolphins of the mixed group were killed and processed in a
    bay at Taiji, Japan. This is a request for data from any source
    relating to the potential survival of the released cetaceans,
    specifically trauma-induced responses known to affect the potential
    for the group or the individuals to survive. <br>
    <br>
    Thank you,<br>
    <br>
    William W. Rossiter
    <br>
    President
    <br>
    Cetacean Society International
    <br>
    P.O. Box 953, Georgetown, CT 06829 USA
    <br>
    t/c: 203.770.8615, f: 860.561.0187
    <br>
    <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated"
      href="mailto:rossiter@csiwhalesalive.org">rossiter@csiwhalesalive.org</a>
    <br>
    <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated"
      href="http://www.csiwhalesalive.org">www.csiwhalesalive.org</a>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>