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    <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">Dear colleagues: we are
      pleased to announce the recent publication of </span><span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">"Sperm
      whale population structure in the eastern and central North
      Pacific inferred by
      the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), microsatellites
      and
      mitochondrial DNA." in a special issue of Molecular Ecology
      Resources on SNP development in non-model organisms.<br>
      <br>
      The article can be obtained from the journal website<br>
      <a
href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1755-0998.2010.02973.x/abstract">http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1755-0998.2010.02973.x/abstract</a><br>
      <br>
      or by contacting <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Sarah.Mesnick@Noaa.gov">Sarah.Mesnick@Noaa.gov</a><br>
      <br>
      Reference <br>
    </span><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">Mesnick, S.L., Taylor,
      B.L., Archer, F.I., Martien, K.K., Escorza Trevino, W.,
      Hancock-Hanser, B.L.,
      Moreno Medina, S.C., Pease, V.L., Robertson, K.M., Straley, J.M.,
      Baird, R.W.,
      Calambokidis, J., Schorr, G.S., Wade, P., Burkanov, V., Lunsford,
      C.R.,
      Rendell, L. and Morin, P.A.<span style="">  </span>2011. Sperm
      whale population structure in the eastern and central North
      Pacific inferred by
      the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), microsatellites
      and
      mitochondrial DNA. Molecular Ecology Resources</span><span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";"> </span><span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">11 (Supplement 1): </span><span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">278–298.<br>
      <br>
    </span><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">Abstract</span><br>
    <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">We use mitochondrial DNA
      (mtDNA) (400 bp), six microsatellites and 36 single-nucleotide
      polymorphisms (SNPs), 20 of</span> <span style="font-size: 11pt;
      font-family: "Garamond","serif";">which were
      linked, to investigate population structure of sperm whales
      (Physeter macrocephalus) in the eastern and central </span><span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">North Pacific. SNP
      markers, reproducible across technologies and laboratories, are
      ideal for long-term studies of globally</span> <span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">distributed species such
      as sperm whales, a species of conservation concern because of both
      historical and contemporary </span><span style="font-size: 11pt;
      font-family: "Garamond","serif";">impacts. We
      estimate genetic differentiation among three strata in the
      temperate to tropical waters where females are</span> <span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">found: California
      Current, Hawai`i and the eastern tropical Pacific.We then consider
      how males on sub-Arctic foraging </span><span style="font-size:
      11pt; font-family: "Garamond","serif";">grounds
      assign to these strata. The California Current stratum was
      differentiated from both the  other strata (P < 0.05) for</span>
    <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">mtDNA, microsatellites
      and SNPs, suggesting that the region supports a demographically
      independent population and</span> <span style="font-size: 11pt;
      font-family: "Garamond","serif";">providing
      the first indication that males may exhibit reproductive
      philopatry. Comparisons between the Hawai`i stratum </span><span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">and the eastern tropical
      Pacific stratum are not conclusive at this time. Comparisons with
      Alaska males were statistically</span> <span style="font-size:
      11pt; font-family: "Garamond","serif";">significant,
      or nearly so, from all three strata and individuals showed mixed
      assignment to, and few exclusions from, the </span><span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">three potential source
      strata, suggesting widespread origin of males on sub-Arctic
      feeding grounds.We show that SNPs</span> <span style="font-size:
      11pt; font-family: "Garamond","serif";">have
      sufficient power to detect population structure even when genetic
      differentiation is low. There is a need for better </span><span
      style="font-size: 11pt; font-family:
      "Garamond","serif";">analytical methods for
      SNPs, especially when linked SNPs are used, but SNPs appear to be
      a  valuable marker for long-term</span> <span style="font-size:
      11pt; font-family: "Garamond","serif";">studies
      of globally dispersed and highly mobile species.</span>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
***************************************************
Sarah L. Mesnick, PhD
Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries Service
La Jolla * Santa Cruz * Pacific Grove
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://swfsc.noaa.gov">http://swfsc.noaa.gov</a>

<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:sarah.mesnick@noaa.gov">sarah.mesnick@noaa.gov</a>

3333 N. Torrey Pines Court 
La Jolla, CA 92037
858.546.7148 (office)
858.546.7003 (fax)
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://swfsc.noaa.gov/prd-behavior">http://swfsc.noaa.gov/prd-behavior</a>
*************************************************** 
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