<html>
<body>
Dear Marmam subscribers,<br><br>
the following article has been pubished on Remote Sensing of the
Environment, and it is now available online at: <br><br>
<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2007.11.017" eudora="autourl">
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2007.11.017<br><br>
</a>Please note access to the full text of this article will depend on
your personal or institutional entitlements.<br><br>
Best regards,<br><br>
Simone Panigada<br><br>
<br>
<b>Modelling habitat preferences for fin whales and striped dolphins in
the Pelagos<br>
Sanctuary (Western Mediterranean Sea) with physiographic and remote<br>
sensing variables<br><br>
</b>Simone Panigada, Margherita Zanardelli, Monique MacKenzie, Carl
Donovan,<br>
Frédéric Mélin, Philip S. Hammond<br><br>
<b>A B S T R A C T<br><br>
</b>One of the needs of the Pelagos Sanctuary for the Conservation of
Mediterranean Marine Mammals is<br>
information on critical habitats for cetaceans. This study modelled
habitat use and preferences of fin whales<br>
and striped dolphins (the two most abundant species in the area) with the
aim of providing this information,<br>
using sighting data collected between 1993 and 1999. The study area was
divided into a 2Œ latitude by 2Œ<br>
longitude grid. The explanatory variables considered in the models were
physiographic variables (mean, range<br>
and standard deviation of depth and slope, and distance from the nearest
coastline) and remotely-sensed data<br>
(Sea Surface Temperature and Chlorophyll-a concentration). The former
were calculated for each cell using GIS<br>
tools, while the latter were obtained from AVHRR and SeaWiFS sensors.
Generalized Additive Models (GAMs)<br>
with multidimensional smoothers were used to model the distribution of
fin whales and striped dolphins in<br>
relation to these variables, and Classification And Regression Trees were
used for habitat characterization and<br>
predictive models. The GAMs were coupled with Generalized Estimating
Equations (GEEs) to account for<br>
temporal autocorrelation in the errors and to help ensure model selection
was reliable; the QIC statistic was<br>
used alongside GEE-based p-values. Bathymetric features were the most
valuable predictors in the Pelagos<br>
Sanctuary area for both species. Sea Surface Temperature values were
indicators of striped dolphin and fin<br>
whale presence, with both species showing a tendency to prefer colder
waters (21–24 °C). Chl-a levels were<br>
selected by the GAM models only for striped dolphins, and with large
associated uncertainty; this may be<br>
related to the relatively brief period examined (only 2 years) and/or to
any functional relationship operating at a<br>
different geographical or temporal scale. The boosted classification
trees however indicated an importance of<br>
Chl-a for both species. The techniques applied to this dataset proved to
be valuable tools to describe habitat use<br>
and preferences of cetaceans, and the use of the remotely-sensed data can
substantially improve the<br>
predictions. The results of this study will be used for assessing
critical habitats within the Pelagos Sanctuary<br>
and will provide information for conservation and management in the
Sanctuary.<br><br>
Keywords: Mediterranean Sea, Conservation/management, Critical habitat,
Habitat modelling, MPA, Fin whale, Striped dolphin<br>
<x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font color="#800080">___________________________<br>
Simone Panigada, Ph.D.<br>
Vice-President<br>
panigada@inwind.it<br><br>
</font>Tethys Research Institute<br>
Viale G.B. Gadio 2, 20121 Milano, Italy<br>
tel. +39 0272001947 / 0272013943<br>
fax +39 0286995011<br>
tethys@tethys.org <br>
<<a href="http://www.tethys.org/" eudora="autourl">
http://www.tethys.org/</a>> </body>
</html>