<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<br>
Cat litter killing whales, dolphins, porpoises<br>
<<a
 href="http://divinginmalaysia.com/science/cat-litter-killing-whales-dolphins-porpoises">http://divinginmala<wbr>ysia.com/<wbr>science/cat-<wbr>litter-killing-<wbr>whales-dolphins-<wbr>porpoises</a>><br>
<br>
Posted under <<a href="http://divinginmalaysia.com/category/science">http://divinginmala<wbr>ysia.com/<wbr>category/<wbr>science</a>>Science<br>
<br>
Pet owners who flush used cat litter down the lavatory may be
responsible <br>
for the deaths of whales, dolphins and porpoises around Britain's
coast, <br>
according to academics and public health experts.<br>
<br>
<<a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/aug/30/3">http://www.guardian<wbr>.co.uk/environme<wbr>nt/2007/aug/<wbr>30/3</a>>They
have found <br>
evidence of a common parasite in dead marine mammals and say family
cats <br>
could be be the unwitting source. Cats are essential to the life cycle
of <br>
toxoplasma gondii, which can infect most mammals and birds but only as
part <br>
of the food chain.<br>
<br>
The possible link to dolphin deaths has been raised by staff from
Swansea <br>
and Glamorgan universities and the National Public Health Service for
Wales <br>
in a letter to the Veterinary Record. They say that in California
concern <br>
that cat faeces have contributed to sea otter deaths has led to
disposal <br>
warnings on bags of cat litter. But little is known about infection in <br>
marine species around Britain.<br>
<br>
Blood samples from dead stranded cetaceans revealed infection in one in
70 <br>
harbour porpoises, in six of 21 common dolphins and in the only
hump-backed <br>
whale tested. Nearly one in eight Swansea University and health service
<br>
employees admitted flushing cat litter away.
</body>
</html>