<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  <title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
Dear Colleagues,
<br>
<br>
I would like to draw your attention to the following paper, published
in the <b>September</b> edition of the Journal of the Acoustical
Society of America:   Vol 118, No.3, Pt.1 pp.1830-1837<br>
<br>
<b><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman";">Types,
distribution, and seasonal occurrence of sounds attributed to Bryde's
whales (<i>Balaenoptera
edeni)</i> recorded in the eastern tropical Pacific, 1999-2001<o:p></o:p></span></b>
<br>
<span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman";"><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]-->
</span><span style="" lang="DA"><br>
Sara L. Heimlich<small><small>(1)</small></small>, </span><span
 style="font-weight: normal;" lang="DA">David K. Mellinger<o:p></o:p></span><small><small>(1)</small></small>,
<span style="font-weight: normal;">Sharon
L. Nieukirk<small><small>(1)<o:p></o:p></small></small></span>, <span
 style="font-weight: normal;">Christopher
G. Fox<o:p></o:p></span><small><small>(2)
</small></small><i><span style="font-weight: normal;"><br>
(1) Cooperative
Institute for Marine Resources Studies, Oregon State University, and
NOAA
Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 2030 SE Marine Science Drive,
Newport,
Oregon<span style="">  </span>97365<o:p></o:p></span></i>
<br>
<span style=""><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--> </span><span
 style="font-weight: normal;"></span><i><span style="">(2) National
Geophysical Data Center, National Oceanographic and
Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, E/GC, Boulder, Colorado
80305-3328<o:p></o:p></span></i>
<br>
<br>
<b>Abstract</b><br>
<!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--><!--[endif]--><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--><!--[endif]--><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--><!--[endif]--><span
 style="color: windowtext;">Vocalizations resembling
known Bryde’s whale sounds were recorded on autonomous hydrophones at
seven
sites in the eastern tropical Pacific. Five short (<3 s)
low-frequency
(<80 Hz ) “phrase” types were observed. “Swept alternating tonal”
phrases
included a 37 Hz tone and often a 25-16 Hz downswept tone, while
“non-swept
alternating tonal” phrases had a predominant tone at 29 Hz and often
additional
tones at 16 Hz and 47 Hz. Alternating tonal phrases were found in 79%
of the
total hours in which phrases were detected, and occurred primarily at
the
eastern hydrophone sites<i>. </i> “Burst-tonal” phrases included tones
that were often preceded by a wide-band burst of noise. The “low
burst-tonal”
phrase contained tones at 19 Hz and 30 Hz, and was detected at five of
the
hydrophone sites. The “high burst-tonal” phrase included a 42 Hz tone
and was
observed only on the northwestern hydrophones. A single “harmonic tone”
phrase
type was observed that included a fundamental tone at 26 Hz and at
least two
harmonics; this phrase was observed exclusively at the eastern
hydrophone
stations. This opportunistic survey has shown that acoustics is an
effective
means of studying this poorly understood, pelagic balaenopterid.<br>
<br>
<b>ERRATA:<br>
Page 1834, Section C.  Geographic and seasonal occurrence.  The first
sentence should read:<br>
Swept and nonswept alternating tonal phrase types were the most
abundant of the five types, comprising 1535 (46.3% and 1097 (33.1%).
respectively, of the total 3315 PTH.<br>
<br>
</b><br>
Cheers-<br>
<br>
Sara Heimlich<br>
CIMRS/NOAA<br>
</span><span style="font-weight: normal;">Hatfield Marine Science
Center,<br>
2030 SE Marine Science Drive, <br>
Newport,
Oregon<span style="">  </span>97365<o:p></o:p></span>
<br>
(541) 867-0328<br>
<p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--> <!--[endif]--><o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--> <!--[endif]--><o:p></o:p></p>
<p style="margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt;"><br>
</p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--> <!--[endif]--><o:p></o:p></p>
<br>
</body>
</html>