[MARMAM] New publication - review on Southern Hemisphere humpback whales

Elisa Seyboth elisaseyboth at hotmail.com
Thu Oct 19 04:58:11 PDT 2023


Dear MARMAR colleagues,

My co-authors and I are pleased to announce the publication of the following paper:

Seyboth, E., Meynecke, J. O., De Bie, J., Roychoudhury, A. N., & Findlay, K. A review of post-whaling abundance, trends, changes in distribution and migration patterns, and supplementary feeding of Southern Hemisphere humpback whales. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, 997491.<https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2023.997491/full?&utm_source=Email_to_authors_&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=T1_11.5e1_author&utm_campaign=Email_publication&field=&journalName=Frontiers_in_Marine_Science&id=997491>
[https://www.frontiersin.org/files/MyHome%20Article%20Library/997491/997491_Thumb_400.jpg]<https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2023.997491/full?&utm_source=Email_to_authors_&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=T1_11.5e1_author&utm_campaign=Email_publication&field=&journalName=Frontiers_in_Marine_Science&id=997491>
A review of post-whaling abundance, trends, changes in distribution and migration patterns, and supplementary feeding of Southern Hemisphere humpback whales<https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2023.997491/full?&utm_source=Email_to_authors_&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=T1_11.5e1_author&utm_campaign=Email_publication&field=&journalName=Frontiers_in_Marine_Science&id=997491>
Southern Hemisphere humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) were heavily targeted during modern commercial whaling operations, with some 216,000 individuals killed between 1903 and 1973. That impacted the abundance of all the seven breeding stocks of the species. Most of these stocks have been recovering from whaling pressure although the understanding of the current growth rates of some stocks, and how the rates compare across stocks are lacking. Updated information is fundamental for understanding the species’ current status, and to support the review of management plans promoting its protection and recovery, especially considering current changes in ocean environments due to climate change. This work offers a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on Southern Hemisphere humpback whales breeding stocks’ status. The aim is to provide information on their post-whaling growth trends and changes in distribution and migration patterns. Within that, records of supplementary feeding records (i.e. fee
www.frontiersin.org
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Abstract:

Southern Hemisphere humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) were heavily targeted during modern commercial whaling operations, with some 216,000 individuals killed between 1903 and 1973. That impacted the abundance of all the seven breeding stocks of the species. Most of these stocks have been recovering from whaling pressure although the understanding of the current growth rates of some stocks, and how the rates compare across stocks are lacking. Updated information is fundamental for understanding the species’ current status, and to support the review of management plans promoting its protection and recovery, especially considering current changes in ocean environments due to climate change. This work offers a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on Southern Hemisphere humpback whales breeding stocks’ status. The aim is to provide information on their post-whaling growth trends and changes in distribution and migration patterns. Within that, records of supplementary feeding records (i.e. feeding beyond their formally described feeding grounds) are described. We have also identified knowledge gaps and note that the establishment of research collaborations, as well as standard methodologies for data collection can be important steps for the acquisition of better comparable data sets for the analysis of the current status of humpback whales and to fill such gaps. The compiled information provided can be used as part of an In-Depth Assessment of the species by the International Whaling Commission.

With best wishes,
Elisa.


--
Dr Elisa Seyboth

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Mammal Research Institute Whale Unit
Department of Zoology and Entomology
University of Pretoria, South Africa

Collaborating Researcher
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG - Brazil

Tel.: +27 082 420 2047
www.researchgate.net/profile/Elisa_Seyboth<http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Elisa_Seyboth>
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