[MARMAM] New publication: How does habitat influence metabolism? Clues from biomarker response and contaminant profile in Tursiops truncatus (Montagu, 1821) subspecies living in parapatry

Barbara Righetti ba.righetti at gmail.com
Fri Mar 24 09:03:39 PDT 2023


Dear MARMAM community,

On behalf of my co-authors, I am pleased to inform you about our new
publication, entitled:
"How does habitat influence metabolism? Clues from biomarker response and
contaminant profile in Tursiops truncatus (Montagu, 1821) subspecies living
in parapatry" in Science of The Total Environment.


Righetti, B.P.H., Mattos, J.J., Manaut, L.R., Silva, J., Lourenço, R.A.,
Fruet, P., Bainy, A.C.D., Luchmann, K.H. How does habitat influence
metabolism? Clues from biomarker response and contaminant profile in
Tursiops truncatus (Montagu, 1821) subspecies living in parapatry. Science
of the Total Environment 877, 2023.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.162900.


Abstract
In western South America (WSA) two subspecies of bottlenose dolphin are
recognized: Tursiops truncatus gephyreus, predominantly found in estuaries
and river mouths, and Tursiops truncatus truncatus, occurring along the
continental shelf. Despite a partial spatial overlap, both subspecies are
considered to occupy different habitats and ecological niches. In the
present study, chemical analyzes as well as biochemical and molecular
biomarkers were used to investigate the influence of niche partitioning
over metabolic pathways associated with the detoxification of persistent
organic pollutants (POPs), antioxidant metabolism, immune activity and
lipid metabolism in Tursiops truncatus subspecies living in parapatry.
Overall, the profile and levels of bioaccumulated PCBs, pesticides and
PBDEs were similar between groups, with a greater variety of pesticides,
such as γ-HCHs, heptachlor, oxychlordane and o,p'DDT, detected in T.
truncatus gephyreus. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and
non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) results indicated that
glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymatic
activities were higher in coastal dolphins, as were the mRNA levels of
metallothionein 2A (MT2A), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), ceramide synthase 3
(CERS3) and fatty acid elongase (ELOVL4). In parallel, mRNA levels of fatty
acid synthase complex 1 (FASN 1) were higher in oceanic dolphins. These
findings suggest that, due to their occurrence in coastal habitats, T.
truncatus gephyreus is more exposed to environmental pollutants and
pathogenic microorganisms. Likewise, niche partitioning may influence lipid
biosynthesis, possibly due to differences on feeding habits, reflecting in
an enhanced long chain ceramides biosynthesis in T. truncatus gephyreus.
Collectively, these data reinforce the need to address habitat
specificities in conservation efforts, since distinct groups can be facing
different anthropogenic pressures in WSA.


The paper can be freely accessed until May 12th via the publisher ShareLink:

https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1goJ8B8ccyU-y


Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.


Kind regards,

Bárbara Righetti

-- 
Barbara P. H. Righetti
CRBio 89632/01-D
Laboratório de Biomarcadores de Contaminação Aquática e Imunoquímica
(LABCAI)/UFSC - http://labcai.paginas.ufsc.br/
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