[MARMAM] New publication: Temporal dynamics of mother–offspring relationships in Bigg's killer whales: opportunities for kin-directed help by post-reproductive females

Mia Lybkær Kronborg Nielsen mialkronborg at gmail.com
Wed Jun 7 01:11:09 PDT 2023



Dear all,

We are pleased to announce the publication of the following paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences:

Nielsen, M.L.K., Ellis, S., Weiss, M.N., Towers, J.R., Doniol‐Valcroze, T., Franks, D.W., Cant, M.A., Ellis, G.M., Ford, J.K.B., Malleson, M., Sutton, G.J., Shaw, T.J.H., Balcomb III, K.C., Ellifrit, D.K. and Croft, D.P., 2021. Temporal dynamics of mother–offspring relationships in Bigg's killer whales: opportunities for kin-directed help by post-reproductive females. Proc. R. Soc. B. 290: 20230139. 

Abstract:
Age-related changes in the patterns of local relatedness (kinship dynamics) can be a significant selective force shaping the evolution of life history and social behaviour. In humans and some species of toothed whales, average female relatedness increases with age, which can select for a prolonged post-reproductive lifespan in older females due to both costs of reproductive conflict and benefits of late-life helping of kin. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) provide a valuable system for exploring social dynamics related to such costs and benefits in a mammal with an extended post-reproductive female lifespan. We use more than 40 years of demographic and association data on the mammal-eating Bigg's killer whale to quantify how mother–offspring social relationships change with offspring age and identify opportunities for latelife helping and the potential for an intergenerational reproductive conflict. Our results suggest a high degree of male philopatry and female-biased budding dispersal in Bigg's killer whales, with some variability in the dispersal rate for both sexes. These patterns of dispersal provide opportunities for late-life helping particularly between mothers and their adult sons, while partly mitigating the costs of mother–daughter reproductive conflict. Our results provide an important step towards understanding why and how menopause has evolved in Bigg's killer whales.

This article is available in the Proceedings B issue 2000, 2023 and is open access. Link to article: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2023.0139

Sincerely, 
Mia L. K. Nielsen
University of Exeter, UK
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/marmam/attachments/20230607/f3926c9f/attachment-0001.html>


More information about the MARMAM mailing list