[MARMAM] New publication on using interview-based data to measure interactions of artisanal fishing and cetaceans in Sarawak, Malaysia

Cindy Peter cindycharity.peter at gmail.com
Thu Apr 20 01:28:33 PDT 2023


Dear Marmam,

We are pleased to announce another publication from Universiti Malaysia
Sarawak (UNIMAS) and Sarawak Dolphin Project entitled "Utilizing
interview-based data to measure interactions of artisanal fishing
communities and cetacean populations in Kuching Bay, Sarawak, East
Malaysia".

Citation:
Samantha A., Peter, C., Minton, G., Ngeian, J., Zulkifli Poh, A.N.,
Mujahid, A., and Tuen, A.A. 2023. Utilizing interview-based data to measure
interactions of artisanal fishing communities and cetacean populations in
Kuching Bay, Sarawak, East Malaysia. Ocean & Coastal Management 239:
106592. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2023.106592.


Abstract
Kuching Bay is a significant area for artisanal fishing activities as well
as an Important Marine Mammal
<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/marine-mammal>
Area
(IMMA) for coastal cetaceans. A total of 286 fishers from eight fishing
communities were interviewed between 2011 and 2019 to determine the nature
and extent of cetacean-fishery interactions in the area. The main types of
fishing gears recorded were gillnets
<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/gillnet>,
trammel nets, trawl nets
<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/trawl-net>,
longlines, handlines and crab traps, with the use of gears varying by
season and target species. Depredation, net damage, and entanglements
<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/engineering/entanglement> in fishing
gear were the most frequently reported negative interactions with
cetaceans. Thirty-six percent of fishers reported having experienced a
cetacean entanglement in their fishing gear at least once. More than half
(58.1%) of the respondents who experienced bycatch
<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/by-catch>
were
able to disentangle and release the animals alive. The more conservative
calculated bycatch rate of 0.36 cetaceans per fisher over a fishing career
indicates that a minimum estimated average of 19 cetaceans are involved in
bycatch annually in Kuching Bay, with as many as nine of these incidents
likely resulting in mortality. However, a less conservative method yields a
bycatch rate of 0.57 per fisher, and estimated an average of 30 bycaught
cetaceans per year. Irrawaddy dolphins (*Orcaella brevirostris*) were
reported to be at the highest risk (72.9% of reported incidents), with an
estimated minimum of seven individuals caught and killed per year. Despite
the negative interactions, 77.2% of respondents reported a generally
positive attitude toward cetaceans based on their value for tourism and as
indicators of fish presence and a healthy ecosystem. Mutualistic
relationships between fishers and cetaceans were documented, with 53% of
respondents reporting that they feed discarded fish to cetaceans. The
results of this study can be used to guide effective mitigation measures
<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/mitigation-measure>,
which should focus on training fishers in safe handling and release of
entangled cetaceans, and, more importantly, methods to prevent interactions
with gillnets.

Elsevier has provided the authors with a Share Link which gives free access
to the article until 2 June 2023. Just click on the link to download the
pdf: https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1gvYc3RKK-y1DN

Do not hesitate to contact me (pcindy at unimas.my) in case of further
questions!

Happy Reading!!

Regards,

-- 
Cindy Peter, MSc (Marine Ecology)
Research Fellow and Lecturer
Sarawak Dolphin Project
Institute of Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation
University Malaysia Sarawak
https://www.facebook.com/SarawakDolphinProject
<http://www.ibec.unimas.my/SDP2008>

Office: +60 82 583 069
Mobile: +60 16 892 6027
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