[MARMAM] New publication on Cuvier's beaked whale dive classifications

David Sweeney dsweeney at marecotel.org
Fri Jul 1 12:22:50 PDT 2022


Dear marmam community,

My co-authors and I are pleased to announce the publication of our recent
research article:

Sweeney DA, Schorr GS, Falcone EA, Rone BK and others (2022) Cuvier’s
beaked whale foraging dives identified via machine learning using depth and
triaxial acceleration. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 692:195-208.
https://doi.org/10.3354/meps14068

The paper is open access and can be downloaded from:
https://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v692/p195-208/

Abstract:
Knowledge of Cuvier’s beaked whale Ziphius cavirostris behavior has
expanded through the utilization of animal-borne tags. However, many tag
types do not record sound — thus preventing echolocation click detections
to identify foraging — or have short deployments that sample a limited
range of behaviors. As the quantity of such non-acoustic tag data grows, so
too does the need for robust methods of detecting foraging from
non-acoustic data. We used 692 dives from 5 sound-recording tags on
Cuvier’s beaked whales in southern California, USA, to develop extreme
gradient boosting tree models to detect foraging based on 1 Hz depth and 16
Hz triaxial acceleration data. We performed repeated 10-fold cross
validation using classification accuracy to tune 500 models with randomly
partitioned training and testing datasets. An average of 99.9 and 99.2% of
training and testing dataset dives, respectively, were correctly classified
across the 500 models. Dives without associated sound recordings (n = 2069
from 7 whales including 4 non-acoustic tags) were classified via a model
that maximized training information using dive depth and duration, ascent
and descent rates, bottom-phase average vertical speed, and roll circular
variance during dive descents and bottom phases. Of all long, deep dives
(conventionally assumed to include foraging), 2.4% were classified as
non-foraging dives, while 0.3% of short, shallow dives were classified as
foraging dives. Results confirm that conventional depth and/or duration
classifiers provide reasonable estimates of longer-term foraging patterns.
However, additional variables previously listed enhance foraging detections
for unusual dives (notably non-foraging deep dives) for southern California
Cuvier’s beaked whales.

Do not hesitate to email me with any questions.

Best,
David Sweeney

-- 
David Sweeney, Research Assistant
Marine Ecology and Telemetry Research
2468 Camp McKenzie Trail NW, Seabeck WA 98380-4513
dsweeney at marecotel.org | 224-804-7754
www.marecotel.org
Follow MarEcoTel on Facebook, <https://www.facebook.com/marecotel/> Twitter
<https://twitter.com/marecotel>, and Instagram
<https://www.instagram.com/marecotel/>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/marmam/attachments/20220701/8a4c491f/attachment.html>


More information about the MARMAM mailing list