[MARMAM] New publication: common dolphin producing porpoise clicks --- (correct version)

Mel Cosentino orcinus.orca.1758 at gmail.com
Mon Feb 21 12:15:10 PST 2022


Dear MarMamers

I am very pleased to announce our latest publication, titled "I beg your
pardon? Acoustic behaviour of a wild solitary common dolphin who interacts
with harbour porpoises". Our results suggest that this female dolphin
produces clicks similar to those emitted by porpoises, after having spent
almost 20 years alone in a an area with high density of porpoises in west
Scotland.

*Please note* that an eariler version of the manuscript was mistakenly
published by the Publishers (Taylor and Francis), which was online from the
10th of January. The link below is to the corrected version.

Windy greetings
Mel and co-authors


Cosentino M, Nairn D, Coscarella M, Jackson J & Windmill J. I beg you
pardon? Acoustic behaviour of a wild solitary common dolphin who interacts
with harbour porpoises. Bioacoustics.
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09524622.2021.1982005

*Abstract*

Kylie is a solitary common dolphin who inhabits a restricted area within
the Firth of Clyde (Scotland). She spends most of her time around
navigational buoys in the Hunterston/Fairlie channel, where she has been
seen interacting with harbour porpoises. Recordings from 2016 and 2017 were
used to study her acoustic behaviour when seen alone and with a porpoise.
Clicks were classified as potential porpoise or dolphin clicks based on the
waveform, power spectrum, and spectrogram, as well as direction of arrival,
inter-click interval, amplitude, and centroid frequency variations. Kylie
emitted clicks exclusively, which were of variable nature, including low,
mid, and high-frequency (HF, centroid frequency > 100 kHz) as well as broad
or narrowband. Some of Kylie’s HF clicks were similar to porpoise clicks
both in the time (e.g. polycyclic) and frequency (e.g. narrowband with most
energy between 100 and 150 kHz) domains, which cannot fully be explained by
recording geometry and directionality effects.

-- 
*Mel Cosentino, PhD*
Marine Mammal Researcher
Whalesafari, Norway
Aarhus University, Denmark
www.PorpoiseLady.org
@PorpoiseLady

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing" - E. Burke
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