[MARMAM] New publication: When and how to say goodbye: An analysis of Standard Operating Procedures that guide end-of-life decision-making for stranded cetaceans.

Rebecca Boys rebeccaboys at hotmail.com
Mon Feb 21 15:03:23 PST 2022


Dear MARMAMers,


Apologies for posting again, it seems that the link did not work correctly on the last email.




We are pleased to announce our recent publication in Marine Policy regarding end-of-life decision-making for stranded cetaceans.



Boys, R.M., Beausoleil, N.J., Betty, E.L., Stockin, K.A. (2022). When and how to say goodbye: An analysis of Standard Operating Procedures that guide end-of-life decision-making for stranded cetaceans. Marine Policy, 138C: 104949, 10.1016/j.marpol.2021.104949



Abstract:

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) are tools used to ensure management best practice during emergency incidents including wildlife interventions, such as cetacean strandings. The compromised state of stranded cetaceans means humane end-of-life decisions may be considered, and SOPs frequently guide this process. This study evaluated SOPs for end-of-life decision-making and technically enacting euthanasia of stranded cetaceans across Australasia. The aim was to highlight similarities and differences in management and explore directions to improve stranded cetacean welfare. SOPs were requested from the eight government authorities across Australia and New Zealand. All SOPs were evaluated for decision-making criteria, yielding 29 parameters for the implementation of end-of-life decisions. Euthanasia and palliative care were options for end-of-life, with palliative care recommended when euthanasia was not feasible or presented human safety risks. Three euthanasia methods were recommended. Ballistics was recommended in seven SOPs, chemicals in five and explosives in three SOPs. Variability existed in the exact procedures and equipment recommended in all three methods. Additionally, only five SOPs provided criteria for verifying death, while only two recommended time-to-death be recorded, hindering evaluation of the welfare impacts of end-of-life decisions and euthanasia procedures. Our findings highlight the need for detailed guidance and consistency in end-of-life decisions and euthanasia techniques to ensure reliable welfare outcomes. Systematic, standardised data collection at euthanasia events across regions is required to facilitate assessment of welfare impacts and develop evidence-based recommendations. International collaboration is key to developing objective criteria necessary to ensure consistent guidance for end-of-life decisions.



You can download the paper freely using this link for the next 50 days:
https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1ecGf,714MjLeX


Alternatively, please feel free to contact me if you would like a PDF of the paper or if you have any questions.



Thank you very much,

Rebecca







Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2022 21:11:24 +0000

From: Rebecca Boys <rebeccaboys at hotmail.com<mailto:rebeccaboys at hotmail.com>>

To: "MARMAM at lists.uvic.ca<mailto:MARMAM at lists.uvic.ca>" <marmam at lists.uvic.ca<mailto:marmam at lists.uvic.ca>>

Subject: [MARMAM] New publication: When and how to say goodbye: An

              analysis of Standard Operating Procedures that guide end-of-life

              decision-making for stranded cetaceans.



Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"



Dear Marine Mammal Community,



We are pleased to announce our recent publication in Marine Policy regarding end-of-life decision-making for stranded cetaceans.



Boys, R.M., Beausoleil, N.J., Betty, E.L., Stockin, K.A. (2022). When and how to say goodbye: An analysis of Standard Operating Procedures that guide end-of-life decision-making for stranded cetaceans. Marine Policy, 138C: 104949, 10.1016/j.marpol.2021.104949



Abstract:

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) are tools used to ensure management best practice during emergency incidents including wildlife interventions, such as cetacean strandings. The compromised state of stranded cetaceans means humane end-of-life decisions may be considered, and SOPs frequently guide this process. This study evaluated SOPs for end-of-life decision-making and technically enacting euthanasia of stranded cetaceans across Australasia. The aim was to highlight similarities and differences in management and explore directions to improve stranded cetacean welfare. SOPs were requested from the eight government authorities across Australia and New Zealand. All SOPs were evaluated for decision-making criteria, yielding 29 parameters for the implementation of end-of-life decisions. Euthanasia and palliative care were options for end-of-life, with palliative care recommended when euthanasia was not feasible or presented human safety risks. Three euthanasia methods were r!

ecommended. Ballistics was recommended in seven SOPs, chemicals in five and explosives in three SOPs. Variability existed in the exact procedures and equipment recommended in all three methods. Additionally, only five SOPs provided criteria for verifying death, while only two recommended time-to-death be recorded, hindering evaluation of the welfare impacts of end-of-life decisions and euthanasia procedures. Our findings highlight the need for detailed guidance and consistency in end-of-life decisions and euthanasia techniques to ensure reliable welfare outcomes. Systematic, standardised data collection at euthanasia events across regions is required to facilitate assessment of welfare impacts and develop evidence-based recommendations. International collaboration is key to developing objective criteria necessary to ensure consistent guidance for end-of-life decisions.



You can download the paper freely using this link for the next 50 days: https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1ecGf,714MjLeX<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fauthors.elsevier.com%2Fa%2F1ecGf%2C714MjLeX&data=04%7C01%7Cr.boys%40massey.ac.nz%7Ca964504eff494b7455dc08d9f2cc88d0%7C388728e1bbd0437898dcf8682e644300%7C1%7C0%7C637807782575556507%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000&sdata=yx8DBJMk2g6Q8u2tBZUvbdJ4pCWtUW%2B4J%2BfhSY9gDus%3D&reserved=0<https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1ecGf,714MjLeX%3chttps:/apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fauthors.elsevier.com%2Fa%2F1ecGf%2C714MjLeX&data=04%7C01%7Cr.boys%40massey.ac.nz%7Ca964504eff494b7455dc08d9f2cc88d0%7C388728e1bbd0437898dcf8682e644300%7C1%7C0%7C637807782575556507%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000&sdata=yx8DBJMk2g6Q8u2tBZUvbdJ4pCWtUW%2B4J%2BfhSY9gDus%3D&reserved=0>>

Alternatively, please feel free to contact me if you would like a PDF of the paper or if you have any questions.



Thank you very much,

Rebecca



-------------------------------------------------------------



Rebecca M Boys







Marine Biologist



PhD Student



Cetacean Ecology Research Group



School of Natural and Computational Sciences



Massey University



Auckland



New Zealand



[cid:a64ccff9-3fc1-4ecb-a48e-57cfaa8d5b9e]<https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rebecca_Boys> [cid:2bb5f15c-510a-4f78-9b1d-b196e3de0645] <https://scholar.google.co.nz/citations?hl=en&user=7rHpOpMAAAAJ> [cid:d7da4fc9-e36c-4cf8-8ef1-afb4c9bc9435] <https://twitter.com/RebeccaMBoys> [cid:dc71995f-7542-47f7-a04e-1866b8c36604] <https://www.facebook.com/CetaceanEcologyOrg/?__xts__[0]=68.ARBKlWSLR-YC7KHNrW51KXYC8RqNWn5mtIpZGlhILsMi73gubXw7i0iNq-bMfLim8n7PnUX74GpGPXJqVJBIxqdfqVAvHxEd2En0qyW6mKYd9Q30p8kEFIBWKPFgrh4uEh6ISXy5ihiNbt8H1yEWprZQN4kZDRW8gPSk6TMiyNoF-uJ0o1uPoosrGMKBKGD8sc4K3SJPD2e-mWqDxZOc_aY670ngZVZm6YlpZzvKj_r_vh_aHHeSQuS7lgktu6h7HwKL_pEGombnfjc6z3ekwEF4Szn9mLA-y643tiUxNSQiFyiDyOzrVFqnT34Ctus2d0A9GXJMVBvnw7lCKoNnEq4kbA<https://www.facebook.com/CetaceanEcologyOrg/?__xts__%5b0%5d=68.ARBKlWSLR-YC7KHNrW51KXYC8RqNWn5mtIpZGlhILsMi73gubXw7i0iNq-bMfLim8n7PnUX74GpGPXJqVJBIxqdfqVAvHxEd2En0qyW6mKYd9Q30p8kEFIBWKPFgrh4uEh6ISXy5ihiNbt8H1yEWprZQN4kZDRW8gPSk6TMiyNoF-uJ0o1uPoosrGMKBKGD8sc4K3SJPD2e-mWqDxZOc_aY670ngZVZm6YlpZzvKj_r_vh_aHHeSQuS7lgktu6h7HwKL_pEGombnfjc6z3ekwEF4Szn9mLA-y643tiUxNSQiFyiDyOzrVFqnT34Ctus2d0A9GXJMVBvnw7lCKoNnEq4kbA>> [cid:7a0aa93d-1cdf-490f-9011-3d412124a0f9] <https://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/explore/research/animal-veterinary/animal/marine/marine_home.cfm>

[cid:5ea84a35-7862-4279-95ad-8b7fced0d3c2]

www.cetaceanecology.org/<https://www.cetaceanecology.org/<http://www.cetaceanecology.org/%3chttps:/www.cetaceanecology.org/>>





Australia and New Zealand Student Chapter SMM Committee member



European Cetacean Society National Contact Person for New Zealand




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