[MARMAM] New publication: Estimation of the feeding record of pregnant Antarctic minke whales (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of baleen plates

Yoko Mitani yo_mitani at fsc.hokudai.ac.jp
Wed Mar 3 22:32:23 PST 2021


Dear all,

On behalf of my co-authors, I am pleased to inform you about our paper
titled "Estimation of the feeding record of pregnant Antarctic minke
whales (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) using carbon and nitrogen stable
isotope analysis of baleen plates", recently published in Polar
Biology. The paper is open access, so please download it from this web
page:
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00300-021-02816-5

Uchida, M., Suzuki, I., Ito, K. et al. Estimation of the feeding
record of pregnant Antarctic minke whales (Balaenoptera bonaerensis)
using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of baleen plates.
Polar Biol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00300-021-02816-5

Abstract

Antarctic minke whales (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) are migratory
capital breeders that experience intensive summer feeding on Antarctic
krill (Euphausia superba) in the Southern Ocean and winter breeding at
lower latitudes, but their prey outside of the Antarctic is unknown.
Stable isotope analyses were conducted on δ13C and δ15N from the
baleen plates of ten pregnant Antarctic minke whales to understand the
growth rate of the baleen plate and their diet in lower latitudes. Two
to three oscillations along the length of the edge of the baleen plate
were observed in δ15N, and the annual growth rate was estimated to be
75.2 ± 20.4 mm, with a small amplitude (0.97 ± 0.21 ‰). Bayesian
stable isotope mixing models were used to understand the dominant prey
that contributed to the isotopic component of the baleen plate using
Antarctic krill from the stomach contents and reported values of
Antarctic coastal krill (Euphausia crystallorophias), Antarctic silver
fish (Pleuragramma antarcticum), Australian krill spp., and Australian
pelagic fish spp.. The models showed that the diet composition of the
most recent three records from the base of the baleen plates (model 1)
and the highest δ15N values in each baleen plate (model 2) were
predominantly Antarctic krill, with a contribution rate of
approximately 80%. The rates were approximately 10% for Antarctic
coastal krill and less than 2.0% for the two Australian prey groups in
both models. These results suggest that pregnant Antarctic minke
whales did not feed on enough prey outside of the Antarctic to change
the stable isotope values in their baleen plates.

Best regards,

Yoko



-- 
三谷曜子 Yoko Mitani
北海道大学北方生物圏フィールド科学センター
海獣班 HokkaidOcean Mammal Team
〒040-0051 北海道函館市弁天町20番5号
函館市国際水産・海洋総合研究センター内219号室
Tel: 0138-85-6558; Fax: 0138-85-6625
Email: yo_mitani at fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Yoko MITANI
HokkaidOcean Mammal Team
Field Science Center for Northern Biosphere, Hokkaido University
Hakodate Research Center for Fisheries and Oceans
20-5 Benten-cho, Hakodate, Hokkaido 040-0051, JAPAN
TEL: +81-138-85-6558; FAX: +81-138-85-6625
E-mail: yo_mitani at fsc.hokudai.ac.jp



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