[MARMAM] New publication on the ultrasonic vocalizations of Antillean manatees in Belize

Eric Angel Ramos eric.angel.ramos at gmail.com
Thu Feb 6 12:15:12 PST 2020


Greetings MARMAM,

I am pleased to announce the publication of our most recent article titled
“The Antillean manatee produces broadband vocalizations with ultrasonic
frequencies” in JASA Express Letters.

Ramos EA, Collom KC, Brady B, Gerstein E, Magnasco MO, Reiss D. 2020. The
Antillean manatee produces broadband vocalizations with ultrasonic
frequencies. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 147, EL80.
doi.org/10.1121/10.0000602

ABSTRACT
Antillean manatees produce vocalizations reported to be important for
communication, but their vocal behavior throughout their geographic range
is poorly understood. A SoundTrap recorder (sample rates: 288/576 kHz) was
deployed in Belize to record vocalizations of wild manatees in a seagrass
channel and of a young rehabilitated and released manatee in a shallow
lagoon. Spectral analysis revealed broadband vocalizations with frequencies
up to 150 kHz and a high proportion of calls with ultrasonic components.
Ultrasonic frequency components appear prevalent in their vocal repertoire
and may be important to manatee communication.

The article is Open Access and can be download free online at the following
link:

https://asa.scitation.org/doi/10.1121/10.0000602

If you have any questions please feel free to contact me at:
eric.angel.ramos at gmail.com

Cheers,

***********************************************
Eric Angel Ramos
Ph.D. Candidate Animal Behavior & Comparative Psychology
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
E-mail: eric.angel.ramos at gmail.com
Cell: 1(347) 336-5567

Student Member-at-Large
Board of the Society for Marine Mammalogy


On Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 2:07 PM <marmam-request at lists.uvic.ca> wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. New publication on the role of morphology and body size in
>       heat conservation and dissipation (Stephanie Adamczak)
>    2. Interdisciplinary PhD Position: Marine Mammal Ecology & One
>       Health (University of Maine) (Kristina Cammen)
>    3. Information on Cetacean Data Collection or Research done in
>       Colombian (Carole V)
>    4. Invitation to Present at ICUA2020 (GMail)
>    5. New paper about effects of multiple exposures to pile driving
>       noise on harbor porpoise hearing during simulated flights
>       (Schaffeld, Tobias)
>    6. New paper on the identification of a humpback whale breeding
>       ground in the Mariana Archipelago (Marie Hill - NOAA Affiliate)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 4 Feb 2020 12:39:29 -0800
> From: Stephanie Adamczak <sadamcza at ucsc.edu>
> To: marmam at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: [MARMAM] New publication on the role of morphology and body
>         size in heat conservation and dissipation
> Message-ID:
>         <CAOwUxehdhyzAs8mPY+jjsRQTNZ8FKKmsB8UiXHkK=
> wjFekV5cQ at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Dear MARMAM,
>
> My colleagues and I are excited to announce our new publication assessing
> the role that body and appendage morphology plays in heat dissipation and
> conservation in pilot whales and implications for ecogeographic roles. The
> article has been published in the Journal of Biogeography, available here
> https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jbi.13796.
>
> Please feel free to contact me at sadamcza at ucsc.edu if you have any
> questions.
>
> Abstract
> Aim
> The aim of this study was to determine if marine mammals follow
> ecogeographic rules. We examined Bergmann's rule and Allen's rule in two
> pilot whale species with contrasting latitudinal distributions.
>
> Location
> Northwest Atlantic Ocean.
>
> Taxon
> *Globicephala *spp.
>
> Methods
> We analysed morphometric data collected from strandings of short? and
> long?finned pilot whales in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean to assess
> intraspecific and interspecific variation in surface area to volume ratios
> (SA:V) of the body core and appendage surface area relative to body core SA
> (normalized appendage SA) using a novel 3D modelling method.
>
> Results
> Our results suggest that ecogeographic variation in morphometrics between
> the two pilot whale species is consistent with morphological adaptations
> required to balance heat conservation and heat dissipation. Interspecific
> differences in morphology supported Bergmann's rule for fully grown
> individuals: the more temperate long?finned pilot whale had a larger body
> size and lower body core SA:V than the short?finned pilot whale, which has
> a more tropical distribution. Allen's rule was not supported; when all
> appendages were considered together, long?finned pilot whales had larger
> normalized SA than short?finned pilot whales. However, the pectoral
> flippers were the primary driver of this relationship; while long?finned
> pilot whales had proportionally larger pectoral flippers, short?finned
> pilot whales had proportionally larger dorsal fins and flukes. In addition,
> larger long?finned pilot whales (i.e. males and mature individuals) had
> proportionally larger pectoral flippers than smaller long?finned pilot
> whales.
>
> Main Conclusions
> Pilot whales follow Bergmann's rule but do not follow Allen's rule when
> fully mature. Thinly insulated appendages in marine mammals can be used to
> dissipate heat as the core warms, and larger and better insulated marine
> mammals may require relatively larger appendages in order to offload heat
> and thermoregulate effectively. Our results provide novel insight into
> ecogeographic rules and suggest that species in higher latitude climates
> towards the poles will demonstrate tradeoffs between core body heat
> conservation and appendage heat dissipation.
> --
> _______________________
> Stephanie K. Adamczak, M.S.
> Ph.D. Student, Department of  Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
> University of California Santa Cruz
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 5 Feb 2020 08:11:23 -0500
> From: Kristina Cammen <kristina.cammen at maine.edu>
> To: marmam at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: [MARMAM] Interdisciplinary PhD Position: Marine Mammal
>         Ecology & One Health (University of Maine)
> Message-ID:
>         <CAO_1K8Q=F3wBHcnRV=9Lj8QsoyLmqeO-irZ90W7ZWwcMbdks=
> w at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> As part of a new National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT)
> program in Convergence of Social and Biophysical Sciences to Optimize
> Training in One Health, the University of Maine seeks to hire a PhD student
> to study marine mammal disease ecology and ocean health. The student will
> be expected to take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the
> biological, ecological, and social drivers of disease outbreaks in gray and
> harbor seals in the North Atlantic.  We anticipate that immunogenomic
> sequencing and epidemiology-informed population models will be used to
> explore differential species susceptibility, and stakeholder surveys will
> be used to assess the incorporation of disease risk and public perception
> in the protected species management decision-making process. The student
> will also have the opportunity to participate in a related internship with
> a state, regional, or federal agency or non-profit partner to gain direct
> experience with relevant policy.
>
>
>
> The student will be co-advised by Dr. Kristina Cammen (
> http://cammenlab.org)
> and Dr. Carly Sponarski (https://umaine.edu/sponarskilab/).  Graduate
> students can join our labs through the School of Marine Sciences or Ecology
> and Environmental Sciences programs at the University of Maine,
> located in Orono,
> an hour to the ocean and an hour and a half to Maine?s highest peak.  As
> part of the new NRT program, the student will enter these programs as a
> member of an interdisciplinary cohort of PhD and MS students who share
> similar interests across One Health. For more information about the
> interdisciplinary graduate training program in One and the Environment, see
> our program website here:
> https://nsfa.umaine.edu/one-health/one-health-nrt/
>
>
>
> The successful candidate must have a strong background in marine mammal
> ecology and/or ecological genomics, as well as a demonstrated interest in
> human dimensions of wildlife and/or wildlife policy. Prior experience with
> genetics, genomics, and/or bioinformatics will be particularly
> beneficial.  Individuals
> who are intellectually curious, responsible, willing to learn,
> team-oriented, and have attention to detail are encouraged to apply. An
> M.S. in a related field is preferred, but qualified candidates with
> extensive experience will be considered.
>
>
>
> The selected candidate is guaranteed an annual stipend, free tuition and
> fees, and subsidized health insurance coverage for two years supported by
> the current NSF grant. We anticipate that subsequent years of support will
> be provided through a combination of teaching assistantships, research
> assistantships, and student-awarded fellowships.  Students must be U.S.
> citizens or permanent residents to receive NRT funding.  As part of the
> National Science Foundation?s and our commitment to broadening
> participation, we especially encourage women, underrepresented minorities,
> first-generation students, veterans, and students with disabilities to
> apply.
>
> To apply, please send a cover letter describing your qualifications, why
> you
> are interested in pursuing a PhD and in this NRT program in particular, and
> your prior experience working in interdisciplinary teams. Please also send
> a curriculum vitae, unofficial transcripts, and the contact information for
> at least three references. All application materials should be sent to
> kristina.cammen at maine.edu <Kristina.cammen at maine.edu> with ?Marine Mammal
> Health PhD Student Search? as the subject line of your email. All
> applications received before February 21, 2020 will receive full
> consideration, and applications will be accepted on a rolling basis
> thereafter until the position is filled. A start date of September 2020 is
> strongly preferred.
>
>
>
> The University of Maine is an EEO/AA employer and does not discriminate on
> the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including
> transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship
> status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran?s status in
> employment, education, and all other programs and activities. Please
> contact the Director of Equal Opportunity, 101 N. Stevens Hall, Orono, ME
> 04469 at 207-581-1226 (voice), TTY 711 (Maine Relay System), or
> equal.opportunity at maine.edu with questions or concerns.
>
> --
> Kristina Cammen
> Assistant Professor of Marine Mammal Science
> School of Marine Sciences
>
> 5735 Hitchner Hall, Rm 151A
> University of Maine
> Orono, ME 04469
>
> Email: kristina.cammen at maine.edu
> Phone: 207-581-2820
> cammenlab.org
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Tue, 4 Feb 2020 20:24:53 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Carole V <carola_vo at yahoo.ca>
> To: marmam at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: [MARMAM] Information on Cetacean Data Collection or Research
>         done in Colombian
> Message-ID: <1388363563.316011.1580847893251 at mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>
> We are agroup of Colombian scientists who are gathering information on
> previouscetacean research studies done in Colombia. We are creating this
> data base withthe objective of determining what research(es) had been done
> (when, where, whatspecies and which subjects? matter).
>
> Theinformation provided and gathered will be used for the process of
> designatedImportant Marine Mammals Area(s) IMMAs. These areas are defined
> by the MarineMammal Protected Areas Task Force as a discrete portion of
> habitat, importantto marine mammal species, that have the potential to be
> delineated and managedfor conservation. We are considering the importance
> of these area for Colombianwaters. These areas may serve as protection
> and/or monitoring and can be seenas indicative of biodiversity and
> potential ecosystem health for considerationby governments,
> intergovernmental organizations, conservation groups and thegeneral public
> (Marine Mammal Protected Areas Task Force) For this reason, weneed as much
> robust information on this matter.
>
> If someonehas information about this region such as: thesis
> (bachelors/Master)manuscripts, approved or in transition articles, data
> collected and notprocess, we are welcoming all such information. You can
> contact Ann CaroleVallejo at ann.carole.vallejo at gamil.com or Dalia C.
> Barragan Barrera at daliac.barraganbarrera at gmail.com
>
> ?
>
> Beforehand,we would like to thank you for your time and contribution to
> this recollection.
> Kind Regards,?
> Ann Carole Vallejo
> Ann Carole VallejoExecutive Director and Lead ResearcherMSc. Nordic Marine
> Ecosystems and ClimateR&E Ocean Community Conservation Foundation
> Oakville, ON, Canada, L6M 5H5t: +57 (300) 281-0324Wapp: +1 (289)
> 885-3930Email:
> carole.vallejo at oceancommunityconservation.orgwww.oceancommunityconservation.org
>
> |
> |
> |
> |  |  |
>
>  |
>
>  |
> |
> |  |
> Ocean Community Conservation
>
>
>  |
>
>  |
>
>  |
>
>
>
>
>
> The content of this e-mail isintended solely for the use of the individual
> or entity to whom it isaddressed. If you have received this communication
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2020 15:03:14 +0000
> From: GMail <peterdobbins1 at gmail.com>
> To: marmam at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: [MARMAM] Invitation to Present at ICUA2020
> Message-ID: <6F677322-1354-422A-B02E-F6C6A66A51B1 at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> ICUA2020 presentation invitation
>
>
> All are invited to give a presentation in the session entitled
> Bioacoustics, at the International Conference on Underwater Acoustics
> (ICUA) 2020 organised by the Underwater Acoustics Group of the Institute of
> Acoustics. This conference will take place in Southampton (United Kingdom)
> from 6-10 July 2020.
>
> Abstract submission with the deadline of the 14 February is through the
> conference website at http://icua2020.org/
>
> Delegates are expected to fund their own participation and pay the
> registration fee. Presentation lengths will be 15 minutes with 5 minutes
> for questions, and the precise timings of presentations will be decided
> after abstracts have been accepted.
>
> If you require a visa, please refer to the UK Government website.
>
> Further information from the address below and I, along with the other
> conference organisers, look forward to your participation.
>
> Dr Peter F Dobbins
> 20 Broad Close
> Winterborne Kingston
> Blandford Forum
> Dorset UK
> DT11 9BL
>
> +44 (0)7949 836503
>
> peterdobbins1 at gmail.com
>
>
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2020 10:00:51 +0000
> From: "Schaffeld, Tobias" <Tobias.Schaffeld at tiho-hannover.de>
> To: "marmam at lists.uvic.ca" <marmam at lists.uvic.ca>
> Subject: [MARMAM] New paper about effects of multiple exposures to
>         pile driving noise on harbor porpoise hearing during simulated
> flights
> Message-ID: <cb32c04a7b4b4ac49c4d7850966f4e31 at tiho-hannover.de>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Dear MarMam community and colleagues,
>
> My Co-Authors and I are pleased to advertise our recent publication. We
> investigated the potential for a temporary threshold shift in harbour
> porpoises from the reception of multiple pile driving strikes during
> simulated flights. We present a novel and easy to apply evaluation tool,
> which sheds a light on a gap in current protective regulations. This
> evaluation tool can be easily tested and adjusted for other scenarios by
> the provided code, written in R.
>
> Citation:
> Tobias Schaffeld, Joseph G. Schnitzler, Andreas Ruser, Benno Woelfing,
> Johannes Baltzer and Ursula Siebert (2019). ?Effects of multiple exposure
> to pile-driving noise on harbor porpoise hearing during simulated flights -
> an evaluation tool,? J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 147, Issue 2, 4288?4298.
>
> Download link:
> https://doi.org/10.1121/10.0000595
>
>
> Abstract:
> Exploitation of renewable energy from offshore wind farms is substantially
> increasing worldwide. The majority of wind turbines are bottom mounted,
> causing high levels of impulsive noise during construction. To prevent
> temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in harbor porpoise hearing, single strike
> sound exposure levels (SELSS) are restricted in Germany by law to a maximum
> of 160?dB re 1 ?Pa2s at a distance of 750?m from the sound source.
> Underwater recordings of pile driving strikes, recorded during the
> construction of an offshore wind farm in the German North Sea, were
> analyzed. Using a simulation approach, it was tested whether a TTS can
> still be induced under current protective regulations by multiple
> exposures. The evaluation tool presented here can be easily adjusted for
> different sound propagation, acoustic signals, or species and enables one
> to calculate a minimum deterrence distance. Based on this simulation
> approach, only the combination of SELSS regulation, previous dete!
>  rrence, and soft start allow harbor porpoises to avoid a TTS from
> multiple exposures. However, deterrence efficiency has to be monitored..
>
> Do not hesitate to contact me for further questions.
> Thanks for your interest!
>
> With kind regards
> Tobias Schaffeld
>
> ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
> Tobias Schaffeld
> Institute for Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife Research (ITAW)
> University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation
> Werftstr. 6 / 25761 B?sum / Germany
> Tel  +49 511 856 8164 / Fax +49 511 856-8181
>
> http://www.tiho-hannover.de/kliniken-institute/institute/institut-fuer-terrestrische-und-aquatische-wildtierforschung/
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2020 06:44:03 -1000
> From: Marie Hill - NOAA Affiliate <marie.hill at noaa.gov>
> To: marmam at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: [MARMAM] New paper on the identification of a humpback whale
>         breeding ground in the Mariana Archipelago
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CAMh+2QzAuM_Y1bsdiumeReM1DBLnuvTtN_nZ-+ApAQqf42xdHA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> On behalf of my co-authors, I am happy to announce the publication of our
> new article in Endangered Species Research entitled "Found: a missing
> breeding ground for endangered western North Pacific humpback whales in the
> Mariana Archipelago." It is open access and can be downloaded here:
> https://doi.org/10.3354/esr01010.
>
> We prepared a web story with the highlights of the study:
>
> https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/feature-story/international-whales-mystery-uncovering-identity-humpback-whales-breeding-mariana
> .
> Reference:Marie C. Hill*, Amanda L. Bradford, Debbie Steel, C. Scott Baker,
> Allan D. Ligon, Adam C. ?, Jo Marie V. Acebes, Olga A. Filatova, Siri
> Hakala, Nozomi Kobayashi, Yukari Morimoto, Haruna Okabe, Ryosuke Okamoto,
> Julie Rivers, Takayuki Sato, Olga V. Titova, Robert K. Uyeyama, Erin M.
> Oleson
> ABSTRACT: Humpback whales *Megaptera novaeangliae* that breed in the
> western North Pacific (WNP) are listed as endangered under the US
> Endangered Species Act. Previous research in the WNP concluded that the
> full extent of humpback whale breeding areas is unknown. Recovering this
> endangered population requires identifying all associated breeding grounds
> and potential threats in those locations. Prior to 2015, humpback whales
> were known to occur in the Mariana Archipelago (within the WNP), but their
> population identity and habitat use there were unknown. To determine the
> population identity of humpback whales in the Mariana Archipelago and
> whether the area serves as a breeding ground for these whales, small-boat
> photo-identification and biopsy sampling surveys were conducted in the
> southern portion of the archipelago during February and March 2015-2018. A
> total of 14 mother-calf pairs and 27 other non-calf whales were
> encountered. Seven non-calves were re-sighted in multiple years, including
> 4 females associated with calves in one or more years. Competitive behavior
> was observed in multiple years. Comparisons with other North Pacific
> humpback whale catalogs resulted in matches to breeding (Japan and
> Philippines) and feeding (Russia) grounds in the WNP. DNA profiling of 28
> biopsy samples identified 24 individuals (14 females, 10 males)
> representing 7 mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. The haplotype frequencies from
> the Mariana Archipelago showed the greatest identity with the Ogasawara
> breeding ground and Commander Islands feeding ground in the WNP. This study
> establishes the Mariana Archipelago as a breeding area for endangered WNP
> humpback whales, which should be considered in ongoing research and
> conservation efforts.
>
>
> Please contact me with questions or help with the files.
>
> ________________
> Marie C. Hill
> Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research
> Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
> Protected Species Division - Cetacean Research Program
> 1845 Wasp Blvd., Bldg. 176, Honolulu, HI 96818
> marie.hill at noaa.gov
> 808-725-5710
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>
> Subject: Digest Footer
>
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> MARMAM mailing list
> MARMAM at lists.uvic.ca
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of MARMAM Digest, Vol 175, Issue 4
> **************************************
>
-- 
******************************************************************
Eric Angel Ramos
Ph.D. Candidate Animal Behavior & Comparative Psychology
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
E-mail: eric.angel.ramos at gmail.com
Cell: 1(347) 336-5567

Student Member-at-Large
Board of the Society for Marine Mammalogy
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