[MARMAM] New publication: anthropogenic injuries disrupt dolphin social associations

Michelle Greenfield michellergreenfield at gmail.com
Mon Aug 24 13:47:58 PDT 2020


Dear MARMAM community,

My co-authors and I are very happy to announce the publication of our paper
in Marine Mammal Science "Anthropogenic injuries disrupt social
associations of common bottlenose dolphins (*Tursiops truncatus)* in
Sarasota Bay, Florida."

Greenfield, M.R., McHugh, K.A., Wells, R.S., & Rubenstein, D.I.
Anthropogenic injuries disrupt social associations of common bottlenose
dolphins (*Tursiops truncatus)* in Sarasota Bay, Florida. *Marine Mammal
Science.* 2020;1-16. https://doi.org/10.1111/mms.12729

Abstract: Anthropogenic injuries disrupt social associations of common
bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Sarasota Bay, Florida Social
connectivity is important for measuring the fitness of common bottlenose
dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). While interactions in fission-fusion
societies vary between individ- uals, studies show that repeated
interactions enhance reproduction and foraging success. Injuries that
potentially remove an individual from its association network may dis- rupt
these interactions. Using data from the long-term resi- dent dolphin
community in Sarasota Bay, Florida, we investigated how anthropogenic
injuries affect the dolphins' social associations by examining the
differences before and after injury to individuals. We examined group size,
strength, eigenvector centrality, clustering coefficient, and number of
triangles and analyzed whether the animal's sex, age class, type of injury,
or human intervention affected these values. We found that while group size
did not change, injured dolphins had fewer preferred associates (HWI >
0.14) and were found in more fluid groups immedi- ately after injury, but
started returning to normal association levels after 2 years. This initial
decrease in connectivity was not related to the age, sex, type of injury,
or intervention. Despite the fluidity in individual associations, the
strongest bonds remained stable, those between mothers and calves and those
between male alliance partners. These findingsAnthropogenic injuries
disrupt social associations of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops
truncatus) in Sarasota Bay, Florida provide some of the first information
relating injuries and social networks for animals.

The article can be found at the following link:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/mms.12729

Please feel free to email with any questions or request a PDF of the
article: michellergreenfield at gmail.com

Best,
Michelle Greenfield
Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, 2023
Aquadocs Podcast Host and Creator
www.aquadocspodcast.com
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