[MARMAM] New publication: Occurrence, abundance, range and residence patterns of Tursiops truncatus on the coast of Aragua, Venezuela.

Sergio Cobarrubia sergio.cobarrubia at gmail.com
Tue Nov 13 06:03:39 PST 2018


Topic: New publication: Occurrence, abundance, range and residence patterns
of *Tursiops truncatus* on the coast of Aragua, Venezuela.

We are pleased to announce the publication of one paper on *Tursiops
truncatus* in Venezuela.

Cobarrubia-Russo, S., Barreto, G., Lizarraga-Molero, A., Quintero-Torres,
E, Wang, X. 2018. Occurrence, abundance, range and residence patterns
of *Tursiops
truncatus* on the coast of Aragua, Venezuela. Mammal Research. Accepted
28/09/2018  DOI: 10.1007/s13364-018-0401-1.

PDF's paper is available by writing to the corresponding author:
sergio.cobarrubia at gmail.com.

Sergio Cobarrubia-Russo, Aquatic Ecology Laboratory, Ecology Center,
Venezuelan Institute of Scientific Research.

Abstract:
Throughout the distribution of the bottlenose dolphin *Tursiops truncatus*,
the occurrence, abundance, local distribution, and residential patterns are
highly variable according to the pressure of the habitat where sighting
occurs. In Venezuela, a study has been developed for the first time
describing these aspects for the western of Aragua State (central coast of
the country). From 2004 to 2008, 100 field surveys (30 km long) were
conducted; the daily encounter ratio ranged from 0.79 to 1.11
dolphins/survey (Permanova,P<0.01); the abundance was 18.70 (± 9.95)
dolphins/transect (relative abundance of 0.62 dolphins/km), registering an
increase since April 2007 by income of individuals (pseudo-t, P < 0.05).
The sightings covered 56.63 km2, 90%of study area. Eighty-six dolphins were
photo-identified (identification of new dolphins was constant). Residency
analysis was limited to September 2006–August 2007 (continuous sampling); 7
(20.59%) residents (part of a group of 12), 9 (26.47%) occasional visitors
("neighboring group" and "outsiders"), and 18 (52.94%) transients were
found. The study area is an open coast with shelter (bay) and prey that
houses a resident group (sighted throughout the study) that was
occasionally visited by a "neighbor" and occasional groups between October
and February, and by transients throughout the year. This resident group
inhabits the main bay and the coastal axis, and was associated (~ 75% of
sightings) with *Stenella frontalis* (sighted throughout the year).We point
out the importance of the area for both research and conservation due to
the presence of dolphins throughout the year.

Thank you.

-- 
*Sergio Enrique Cobarrubia Russo*
Laboratorio de Ecología Acuática
Centro de Ecología
Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas
Venezuela.
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/marmam/attachments/20181113/28bd1a63/attachment.html>


More information about the MARMAM mailing list