[MARMAM] Recent publication: Photo-identification comparison of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) flukes from Antarctic Area IV with fluke catalogues from East Africa, Western Australia and Eastern Australia

Wally Franklin wally at oceania.org.au
Wed Jan 24 13:17:11 PST 2018


Hi MARMAM,

On behalf of Co-Authors we are pleased to announce the recent publication of:

Franklin, W., Franklin, T., Cerchio, S., Rosenbaum, H., Jenner, C., Jenner, M., Gonçalves, L., Leaper, R., Brooks, L., and Clapham, P. 2017. Photo-identification comparison of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) flukes from Antarctic Area IV with fluke catalogues from East Africa, Western Australia and Eastern Australia. J. CETACEAN RES. MANAGE (17): 1-7.

ABSTRACT
Early ‘Discovery mark’ data together with recent photo-identification, acoustic, genetic and satellite-radio tag data revealed linkages between
humpback whales migrating from breeding grounds (C) off East Africa and the Area III feeding area, from Western Australian breeding grounds
(D) and the Antarctic Area IV feeding area and the East Australian breeding grounds (E1) and Antarctic Area V feeding area. These data also
revealed low levels of intermingling between (E1) and (D) humpback whales in the Antarctic Area IV feeding area consistent with these being
separate populations. Greenpeace photographed the ventral tail flukes of 30 individual humpback whales in the Antarctic Area IV feeding area
(70°E–130°E) from 2 to 9 January 2008, between 62°47’S and 64°14’S latitude and 80°00’E and 112°57’E longitude. Comparisons of the Antarctic
Area IV Greenpeace fluke catalogue (n = 30) with existing reconciled fluke catalogues from East Africa (n = 842), Western Australia (n = 1,558)
and Eastern Australia (n = 1,964), yielded no photo-identification matches. An analysis of the frequencies of whales seen and not seen in Antarctica,
East Africa, Western Australia and Eastern Australia relative to the frequencies expected to have been seen and not seen, based on the estimated
population sizes and the sizes of the catalogues, provided evidence that the Antarctic whales photographed are from a different population to the
East African and East Australian populations. There was weak evidence supporting the hypothesis that the Antarctic whales are from the Western
Australian population but insufficient data were available to determine a clear outcome. A comparison of the Antarctic Area IV Greenpeace catalogue
(n = 30) with other existing African, Indian Ocean, Western and Eastern Australian and/or Antarctic catalogues, together with increased sampling
across the humpback whale feeding season in Antarctica and along the Western and Eastern Australian coastline during their winter migration, is
likely to provide further evidence of the migratory destination of these humpback whales. It will also add to our limited knowledge of the extent of
population overlap within the Antarctic Area III, IV and V feeding areas.

Pdf’s available from: wally at oceania.org.au <mailto:wally at oceania.org.au> 

On behalf of all Authors, Thank you...

Wally & Trish Franklin


........................................................................
Wally Franklin PhD
The Oceania Project
PO Box 646 Byron Bay NSW 2481 Australia
ABN 73 052 470 630   ACN 052 470 630
 
Phone: 0418 797 326
Skype:  oceania.org.au
 
Email: wally at oceania.org.au <mailto:wally at oceania.org.au>
 
Web:	 <http://www.oceania.org.au/>
The Oceania Project <http://www.oceania.org.au/>
iWhales.org <http://www.iwhales.org/>
Songlines - Songs of the eastern Australian humpback whales <http://www.songlinesofthewhales.org/>
The Oceania Project | Facebook <http://www.facebook.com/oceania>
 <https://vimeo.com/iwhales>The Oceania Project | Vimeo <https://vimeo.com/iwhales>
The Oceania Project | SoundCloud <https://soundcloud.com/iwhales>
The Oceania Project  <http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOceaniaProject>|  <https://soundcloud.com/iwhales>YouTube <http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOceaniaProject>
Southern Cross University Whale Research Centre <https://www.scu.edu.au/research-centres/marine-ecology-research-centre/whales-and-dolphins/whale-and-dolphin-research/hervey-bay-whale-research-project/>
 <https://soundcloud.com/iwhales>
 <http://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/357/>Dr Trish Franklin <http://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/357/> |  <https://soundcloud.com/iwhales> <https://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/357/>PhD Thesis <http://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/357/>    Google Scholar Citations <https://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=RAOLIrMAAAAJ&hl=en&authuser=1>
 <http://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/422/>Dr Wally Franklin <http://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/422/>  <http://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/422/>|  <https://soundcloud.com/iwhales>PhD Thesis <http://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/422/>  <https://epubs.scu.edu.au/theses/422/>  Google Scholar Citations <https://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=2wA6lL8AAAAJ&hl=en>

Humpback whales - Spread the Story <https://www.gofundme.com/theoceaniaproject>










































-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/marmam/attachments/20180125/060e5b06/attachment.html>


More information about the MARMAM mailing list