[MARMAM] New publication: Investigation of silver (Ag) deposition in tissues from stranded cetaceans by autometallography (AMG)

Wen-Ta Li heerolee1104 at gmail.com
Wed Jan 10 07:10:25 PST 2018


Dear MARMAM subscribers,

We are pleased to announce the publication of our paper in "Environmental
pollution":

Investigation of silver (Ag) deposition in tissues from stranded cetaceans
by autometallography (AMG)

Wen-Ta Li, Hui-Wen Chang, Meng-Hsien Chen, Hue-Ying Chiou, Bang-Yeh Liou,
Victor Fei Pang, Wei-Cheng Yang, Chian-Ren Jeng

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2018.01.010


Highlights
•Ag distributions in liver and kidney tissues of cetaceans are demonstrated
by AMG.
•Ag concentrations in liver and kidney tissues of cetaceans are estimated
by CHAA.
•Cetaceans have a different metabolic profile of Ag.
•Ag contamination in Pacific Ocean is more severe than other marine regions.
•The health of cetacean in Pacific Ocean may be negatively affected by Ag.

Abstract

Silver, such as silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), has been widely used in
commercial products and may be released into the environment. The
interaction between Ag deposition and biological systems is raising serious
concerns because of one health consideration. Cetaceans, as the top
predators of the oceans, may be exposed to Ag/Ag compounds and suffer
negative health impacts from the deposition of these compounds in their
bodies. In the present study, we utilized autometallography (AMG) to
localize the Ag in the liver and kidney tissues of cetaceans and developed
a model called the cetacean histological Ag assay (CHAA) to estimate the Ag
concentrations in the liver and kidney tissues of cetaceans. Our results
revealed that Ag was mainly located in hepatocytes, Kupffer cells and the
epithelial cells of some proximal renal tubules. The tissue pattern of
Ag/Ag compounds deposition in cetaceans was different from those in
previous studies conducted on laboratory rats. This difference may suggest
that cetaceans have a different metabolic profile of Ag, so a presumptive
metabolic pathway of Ag in cetaceans is advanced. Furthermore, our results
suggest that the Ag contamination in cetaceans living in the North-western
Pacific Ocean is more severe than that in cetaceans living in other marine
regions of the world. The level of Ag deposition in cetaceans living in the
former area may have caused negative impacts on their health condition.
Further investigations are warranted to study the systemic Ag distribution,
the cause of death/stranding, and the infectious diseases in stranded
cetaceans with different Ag concentrations for comprehensively evaluating
the negative health effects caused by Ag in cetaceans.

Free access to the article is available at (here
<https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749117344615>)
until February 28, 2018.

in addition, the full article can be requested at heerolee1104 at gmail.com or
via researchgate (here
<https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322267197_Investigation_of_silver_Ag_deposition_in_tissues_from_stranded_cetaceans_by_autometallography_AMG?ev=prf_ov_fet_res&_iepl%5BviewId%5D=iOS8PYnPbMUMRQAXPDY94OZMiQjd71uvkp3m&_iepl%5Bcontexts%5D%5B0%5D=prfhpi&_iepl%5Bdata%5D%5BstandardItemCount%5D=2&_iepl%5Bdata%5D%5BuserSelectedItemCount%5D=0&_iepl%5Bdata%5D%5BtopHighlightCount%5D=1&_iepl%5Bdata%5D%5BtopHighlightIndex%5D=1&_iepl%5Bdata%5D%5BfeaturedItem1of1%5D=1&_iepl%5BtargetEntityId%5D=PB%3A322267197&_iepl%5BinteractionType%5D=publicationTitle>
)

Best regards,

Wen-Ta
-- 
Wen-Ta Li, DVM, MS
PhD candidate/Veterinary Pathologist
Graduate Institute of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology,
School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University
Veterinarian/Director, Taiwan Cetacean Society
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