[MARMAM] Categorising C-POD click trains to increase taxonomic resolution

Kaitlin Palmer kp37 at st-andrews.ac.uk
Wed Aug 16 10:16:00 PDT 2017


Dear Colleagues;

My co-authors and I are pleased to announce the publication of our
paper,* Categorizing
click trains to increase taxonomic precision in echolocation click loggers.*


As this research is in its early stages, we would especially like to offer
our categorisation model to any colleagues who have with visually validated
C-POD data. Otherwise, anyone wishing to use or build on these methods may
obtain the R model from this study via GitHub repository
https://github.com/JPalmerK/C-POD-encounter-classification


Warm Regards,

Kaitlin Palmer



http://asa.scitation.org/doi/10.1121/1.4996000

Passive acoustic monitoring is an efficient way to study acoustically
active animals but species identification remains a major challenge. C-PODs
are popular logging devices that automatically detect odontocete
echolocation clicks. However, the accompanying analysis software does not
distinguish between delphinid species. Click train features logged by
C-PODs were compared to frequency spectra from adjacently deployed
continuous recorders. A generalized additive model was then used to
categorize C-POD click trains into three groups: broadband click trains,
produced by bottlenose dolphin (*Tursiops truncatus*) or common
dolphin (*Delphinus
delphis*), frequency-banded click trains, produced by Risso's (*Grampus
griseus*) or white beaked dolphins (*Lagenorhynchus albirostris*), and
unknown click trains. Incorrect categorization rates for broadband and
frequency banded clicks were 0.02 (SD 0.01), but only 30% of the click
trains met the categorization threshold. To increase the proportion of
categorized click trains, model predictions were pooled within acoustic
encounters and a likelihood ratio threshold was used to categorize
encounters. This increased the proportion of the click trains meeting
either the broadband or frequency banded categorization threshold to 98%.
Predicted species distribution at the 30 study sites matched well to visual
sighting records from the region.

-- 

Kaitlin Palmer
MASTS PhD student (masts.ac.uk)
E-mail: kp37 at st-andrews.ac.uk <ler4 at st-andrews.ac.uk>
Twitter: @ProcrastinatehD
School of Biology, University of St. Andrews
Sir Harold Mitchell Building,
St. Andrews, Fife
KY16 9TH
U.K.

The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland (SC013532)
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