[MARMAM] New contribution: Food Web Bioaccumulation Model for Resident Killer Whales from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean as a Tool for the Derivation of PBDE-Sediment Quality Guidelines

Juan Jose Alava jj_alava at yahoo.com
Fri Sep 18 11:14:23 PDT 2015


Dear colleagues,
I hope this message finds you well. 

I am pleased to share our new contribution on "Food Web Bioaccumulation Model for Resident Killer Whales from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean as a Tool for the Derivation of PBDE-Sediment Quality Guidelines."


Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology pp 1-14First online: 20 August 2015
doi:10.​1007/​s00244-015-0215-y
Juan José Alava, Peter S. Ross & Frank A. P. C. Gobas 
Abstract
 Resident killer whale populations in the NE Pacific Ocean are at risk due to the accumulation of pollutants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). To assess the impact of PBDEs in water and sediments in killer whale critical habitat, we developed a food web bioaccumulation model. The model was designed to estimate PBDE concentrations in killer whales based on PBDE concentrations in sediments and the water column throughout a lifetime of exposure. Calculated and observed PBDE concentrations exceeded the only toxicity reference value available for PBDEs in marine mammals (1500 μg/kg lipid) in southern resident killer whales but not in northern resident killer whales. Temporal trends (1993–2006) for PBDEs observed in southern resident killer whales showed a doubling time of ≈5 years. If current sediment quality guidelines available in Canada for polychlorinated biphenyls are applied to PBDEs, it can be expected that PBDE concentrations in killer whales will exceed available toxicity reference values by a large margin. Model calculations suggest that a PBDE concentration in sediments of approximately 1.0 μg/kg dw produces PBDE concentrations in resident killer whales that are below the current toxicity reference value for 95 % of the population, with this value serving as a precautionary benchmark for a management-based approach to reducing PBDE health risks to killer whales. The food web bioaccumulation model may be a useful risk management tool in support of regulatory protection for killer whales. 
Alava, J.J., Ross, P.S., Gobas, A.P.C. 2015. Food web bioaccumulation model for resident killer whales from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean as a tool for the derivation of PBDE-Sediment Quality Guidelines. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. DOI: 10.​1007/​s00244-015-0215-y
The article can be found at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280740512_Food_Web_Bioaccumulation_Model_for_Resident_Killer_Whales_from_the_Northeastern_Pacific_Ocean_as_a_Tool_for_the_Derivation_of_PBDE-Sediment_Quality_Guidelines 

Or obtained from the publisher: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00244-015-0215-y?wt_mc=internal.event.1.SEM.ArticleAuthorOnlineFirst# 


Best Wishes,Juan Jose Alava


------------------------------------------------------- 
Juan Jose Alava, PhD  
Adjunct Professor
Resource and Environmental Management, Faculty of Environment, 
Simon Fraser University
8888 University Drive, 
Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6,Canada
E-mail: jalavasa at sfu.ca 
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Juan_Jose_Alava/contributions?ev=prf_act

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