[MARMAM] New publication: comparative analysis of marine mammal tracheas

Andreas Fahlman andreas.fahlman at tamucc.edu
Fri Apr 4 11:29:01 PDT 2014


Dear All,
We would like to draw attention to our recently published paper on the 
structural and functional properties of the conducting airways in marine 
mammals. If you would like a pdf copy of the paper, please send an 
e-mail to:
Andreas Fahlman: andreas.fahlman at tamucc.edu
or Colby Moore: colby_moore at baylor.edu

CITATION
Moore, C., Moore, M.J., Trumble, S., Niemeyer, M., Lentell, B., 
McLellan, W., Costidis, A., Fahlman, A., A Comparative Analysis of 
Marine Mammal Tracheas. Journal of Experimental Biology 217, 1154 (2014).

ABSTRACT
In 1940, Scholander suggested that stiffened upper airways remained
open and received air from highly compressible alveoli during marine
mammal diving. There are few data available on the structural and
functional adaptations of the marine mammal respiratory system. The
aim of this research was to investigate the anatomical (gross) and
structural (compliance) characteristics of excised marine mammal
tracheas. Here, we defined different types of tracheal structures,
categorizing pinniped tracheas by varying degrees of continuity of
cartilage (categories 1–4) and cetacean tracheas by varying
compliance values (categories 5A and 5B). Some tracheas fell into
more than one category along their length; for example, the harbor
seal (Phoca vitulina) demonstrated complete rings cranially, and as
the trachea progressed caudally, tracheal rings changed morphology.
Dolphins and porpoises had less stiff, more compliant spiraling rings
while beaked whales had very stiff, less compliant spiraling rings. The
pressure–volume (P–V) relationships of isolated tracheas from
different species were measured to assess structural differences
between species. These findings lend evidence for pressure-induced
collapse and re-inflation of lungs, perhaps influencing variability in
dive depth or ventilation rates of the species investigated.

-- 
Andreas Fahlman
Department of Life Sciences
Texas A&M- Corpus Christi
6300 Ocean Dr Unit 5892
Corpus Christi, TX 78412
Ph. +1-361-825-3489
Fax +1-361-825-2025
mail: andreas.fahlman at tamucc.edu
web: comparativephysiology.webs.com

-- 
Andreas Fahlman
Department of Life Sciences
Texas A&M- Corpus Christi
6300 Ocean Dr Unit 5892
Corpus Christi, TX 78412
Ph. +1-361-825-3489
Fax +1-361-825-2025
mail: andreas.fahlman at tamucc.edu
web: comparativephysiology.webs.com



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