[MARMAM] New papers: community structure in Atlantic spotted and bottlenose dolphins

Cindy Elliser clionheart at gmail.com
Wed Jul 25 11:11:14 PDT 2012


Dear colleagues,

I am pleased to announce the publication of 2 papers:

*Community structure and cluster definition of Atlantic spotted
dolphins, Stenella
frontalis, in the Bahamas. MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, 00(0): 1–17 (2012)
DOI: 10.1111/j.1748-7692.2012.00576.x*

And

*Replacement dolphins? Social restructuring of a resident pod of Atlantic
bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, after two major hurricanes. 2011
MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE 27:39–59, online early publication 2010: DOI:
10.1111/j.1748-7692.2010.00403.x*

Find the abstracts below.
Please email me at cindy.elliser at gmail.com for pdf copies.

Thanks for your interest,
Cindy Elliser PhD

*Community structure and cluster definition of Atlantic spotted
dolphins, Stenella
frontalis, in the Bahamas
*Abstract:
Fission-fusion dynamics typical of many delphinid populations allow for a
variety
of social grouping patterns. Identifying these groupings is crucial before
conducting
a detailed social structure analysis. This study analyzed the structure of
a population
of Bahamian spotted dolphins, Stenella frontalis. Through long-term
observations
and preliminary analysis, three clusters were defined: Northern, Central,
and Southern.
To quantitatively investigate these delineations, we conducted analysis on
12 yr
of sighting data using SOCPROG 2.3. Coefficients of association (CoA) were
calculated
using the half-weight index, with individuals sighted six or more times per
pooled period (3 yr each). Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (MD),
hierarchical
agglomerative cluster analysis and Mantel tests were conducted to determine
if any
divisions were present. Mantel tests and MD plots analysis supported the
delineations
into the three clusters. Cluster analysis showed cluster groupings, but with
less clear distinctions between the clusters. The amount and strength of
associations
were significantly higher within clusters than between clusters. Based on
behavioral
and geographic overlap, these clusters did not meet the definition of
separate communities
and thus were termed social clusters. These fine scale, within community
divisions, are biologically and socially important aspects of their
community and
are crucial in understanding the dolphins’ social structure.

*Replacement dolphins? Social restructuring of a resident pod of Atlantic
bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, after two major hurricanes*
Abstract:
Environmental variations can influence the structure of ecological
communities
that in turn alter the grouping and association patterns of social
communities. This
study compares the social structure of bottlenose dolphins in the Bahamas
before
and after two major hurricanes. Approximately 30% of regularly seen
individuals
disappeared after the hurricanes, with an equal number of immigrants
arriving
afterwards. The primary goal of this study was to quantitatively describe
social
structure changes occurring after this large-scale emigration (or death)
and subsequent
immigration of individuals using the social analysis program, SOCPROG
2.3. The pre-hurricane results revealed one community with association
patterns
that were consistent with previous work on this population as well as other
welldocumented
populations. Post-hurricane associations revealed that the community
split into two distinct units, whose members associated highly within, but
rarely
between units. Association patterns varied between units. Immigrants
assimilated
well into the population, especially males. Over half of the post-hurricane
associations
involved immigrants, the majority between residents and immigrants, and
primarily involving immigrant males. The costs/benefits of choosing to
associate
with an immigrant individual differ between males and females and may have
been
the driving force for the changes in social structure that occurred.
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