[MARMAM] Aquatic Mammals 36.3 now available online

Kathleen M. Dudzinski kdudzinski at dolphincommunicationproject.org
Tue Sep 21 05:37:18 PDT 2010


Dear MARMAM and ECS-talk subscribers,
The following are abstracts from the most recent issue (Volume 36,  
issue 3, 2010) of Aquatic Mammals.

Aquatic Mammals is the longest running peer-reviewed journal dedicated  
to research on aquatic mammals and is published quarterly with  
manuscripts available as published PDFs in real time. Further  
information about the journal can be found at: http://www.aquaticmammalsjournal.org/

Instructions for authors and formatting guidelines can be found in the  
first volume of each issue and at this link: http://tinyurl.com/AMauthorinstructions

To submit a manuscript for publication consideration, please visit: http://am.expressacademic.org/actions/author.php

If you subscribe to Aquatic Mammals online, you can visit Ingenta  
Connect to download all articles from this volume: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/eaam/am

Please do not contact the listserve editors for PDFs or copies of the  
articles. To obtain a PDF, please subscribe to Aquatic Mammals http://tinyurl.com/AMsubscribe 
  or contact the corresponding author for reprints.

Thank you for your continued interest in the journal and abstract  
postings.

With regards,

Kathleen Dudzinski, Ph.D.
Editor, Aquatic Mammals
aquaticmammals at gmail.com

Aragones, L. V., Roque, M. A., Flores, M. B., Encomienda, R. P.,  
Laule, G. E., Espinos, B. G., et al. (2010). The Philippine marine  
mammal strandings from 1998 to 2009: Animals in the Philippines in  
peril? Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 219-233.
E-mail: lemdva2001 at yahoo.com

Abstract
A well-maintained marine mammal stranding database can be an  
invaluable tool in understanding not only strandings but also changes  
in the marine environment. This study aimed to examine the following  
aspects of marine mammal strandings in the Philippines: species  
composition, temporal (i.e., frequency of stranding per year and  
seasonality) and spatial (i.e., frequency of stranding per region and  
province) variation, proportions of alive or dead specimens, and  
stranding hotspots. In 2008, a systematic collection of data on  
strandings, including out-of-habitat incidents, resulted in an initial  
12-year database—from 1998 to 2009. A total of 178 stranding events  
were recorded: 163 single, 10 mass, and 5 out-of-habitat strandings,  
with an average of 15 observed stranding events annually. Twenty-three  
of the 28 confirmed species of marine mammals in the Philippines were  
recorded to strand, including first-recorded specimens for the Indo- 
Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus), pygmy sperm whale  
(Kogia breviceps), and Longman’s beaked whale (Indopacetus  
pacificus). The top five most frequent species to strand included  
spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) (n = 26), short-finned pilot  
whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) (n = 14), melon-headed whale  
(Peponocephala electra) (n = 13), Risso’s dolphin (Grampus griseus)  
(n = 11), and common bottlenose dolphin (T. truncatus) (n = 10).  
Dugongs (Dugong dugon) stranded seven times since 2001. Strandings  
occurred throughout the year with frequency significantly peaking  
during the northeast (NE) monsoon (November to March) season. Overall,  
Regions III (Central Luzon) and VII (Central Visayas) had the highest  
number of strandings (both n = 27) followed by Regions I (Ilocos) (n =  
22) and V (Bicol) (n = 18). The following provinces or local  
government units were considered hotspots based on high number of  
strandings observed at each area: Zambales, Cagayan, Zamboanga City,  
Negros Oriental, Bohol, Pangasinan, and Bataan. Sixty-five percent of  
all documented stranding events involved live (n = 116) animals. This  
high percentage might be linked to  dynamite fishing (causing acoustic  
trauma), fisheries interactions, or biotoxins from harmful algal  
blooms coupled to their foodweb. These strandings in general validate  
the diverse marine mammal assemblage in the Philippines and reveal the  
various environmental threats with which they deal.

Twiss, S. D., & Franklin, J. (2010). Individually consistent  
behavioural patterns in wild, breeding male grey seals (Halichoerus  
grypus). Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 234-238.
E-mail: s.d.twiss at durham.ac.uk

Abstract
Recent research demonstrates remarkable consistency in interindividual  
differences in behaviour patterns across time or across situations  
indicating that within populations, individuals have different  
behavioural types or personalities. Examples of behavioural  
consistency have been shown in taxa ranging from molluscs to mammals.  
However, there remain few such studies of wild populations and none of  
pinnipeds. This study presents preliminary evidence of behavioural  
types in wild male grey seals (Halichoerus grypus). Activity budget  
analyses revealed highly repeatable individual patterns of alertness  
across successive breeding seasons unrelated to local environmental  
context. While field studies of behavioural types can be challenging,  
it is essential to develop techniques for identifying behavioural  
types in natural populations in order to begin to understand the  
ecological and evolutionary relevance of animal personalities.

Kvadsheim, P. H., Sevaldsen, E. M., Folkow, L. P., &  Blix, A. S.  
(2010). Behavioural and physiological responses of hooded seals  
(Cystophora cristata) to 1 to 7 kHz sonar signals. Aquatic Mammals,  
36(3), 239-247.
E-mail: phk at ffi.no

Abstract
Controlled exposure experiments on captive hooded seals (Cystophora  
cristata) were made to examine behavioural and physiological effects  
of sonar signals. The animals were instrumented with data loggers  
recording  heart rate, dive depth, and swimming activity, and then  
released into a 1,200 m3 net-cage in the ocean. The exposure consisted  
of three different 1-s sonar signals covering the 1 to 7 kHz band  
transmitted either by using 10-s inter-ping intervals and gradually  
increasing source level from 134 to 194 dBRMS (re 1 μPa @1 m) within 6  
min, or using the maximum source level of 194 dBRMS from the first  
ping but gradually decreasing the inter-ping intervals from 100 s to  
10 s within 10 min (duty cycle increasing from 1 to 10%). Transmission  
loss from the source to the animal varied from 10 to 27 dB, depending  
on the exact location within the net-cage and the transmitted  
frequency. The animals responded to the initial (10% duty cycle)  
exposure with avoidance to signals above 160 to 170 dBRMS (re 1 μPa)  
received levels. This involved reduced diving activity, commencement  
of rapid exploratory swimming at surface, and eventually displacement  
to areas of least sound pressure level. However, already upon the  
second exposure, the initial rapid swimming activity was absent, while  
the reduction in diving activity became even more pronounced. No  
differences were found in behavioural response to different  
transmitted frequencies. Increased heart rate at the surface indicates  
emotional activation during sonar exposure, but lack of effect of  
sonar exposure on heart rate during diving indicates that  
physiological responses to diving remain intact.

Sweeney, J. C., Stone, R., Campbell, M., McBain, J., St. Leger, J.,  
Xitco, M., et al. (2010). Comparative survivability of Tursiops  
neonates from three U.S. institutions for the decades 1990-1999 and  
2000-2009. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 248-261.
E-mail: jsweeney at dolphinquest.com

Abstract
Animal managers from three institutions that hold Tursiops truncatus  
participated in a workshop directed at documenting survivability of  
Tursiops neonates (birth to 30 d of age) in their managed populations.  
Key information was generated for the period 1990 through 2009 for the  
three organizations. Included in the findings are (1) documentation of  
the total live births, total fatalities, and causal factors of neonate  
losses; (2) recommendations for optimizing animal management  
procedures through standardized monitoring and husbandry intervention  
techniques, resulting in the best possible survivability of neonates;  
and (3) comparison of neonate survivability between the years 1990 to  
1999 (78.2% of live births) and 2000 to 2009 (90.6% of live births),  
the latter decade representing progressing improvements in  
survivability resulting from recommended animal management procedures.

Jeglinski, J. W. E., Mueller, B., Pörschmann, U., & Trillmich, F.  
(2010). Field-based age estimation of juvenile Galapagos sea lions  
(Zalophus wollebaeki) using morphometric measurements. Aquatic  
Mammals, 36(3), 262-269.
E-mail: jjeglinski at uni-bielefeld.de

Abstract
Information about the age of juvenile pinnipeds is necessary for an  
understanding of ontogeny-specific patterns and strategies. Exact age  
determination of juvenile cohorts from wild populations is best  
achieved through birth observations and subsequent marking, but this  
involves a considerable time lag during which juveniles mature. A  
combination of body and teeth measurements of known-age Galapagos sea  
lion juveniles taken during brief routine captures in the field was  
used to create age prediction models. Several general linear models  
(GLMs) produced reliable age estimates for male and female juveniles  
up to an age of 2 y. Teeth measurements were important predictors of  
age: male age was best estimated using upper canine length (CL), mass,  
and girth, while the best predictors for female age were CL, canine  
width (CW), body length (SL), body mass, and an interaction between CL  
and CW. The presented method of aging wild unmarked juveniles in the  
field is applicable during routine captures, requires little  
equipment, and yields a considerable increase of information for  
studies involving brief sampling periods in the field. We suggest its  
adjustment, testing, and application in studies of juveniles of other  
species.

Schreer, J. F.,  Lapierre, J. L., & Hammill, M. O. (2010). Stomach  
temperature telemetry reveals that harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups  
primarily nurse in the water. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 270-277.
E-mail: schreejf at potsdam.edu

Abstract
Research on a captive harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) mother-pup pair  
showed that ingestion of milk caused a decrease in stomach temperature  
(Hedd et al., 1995). Herein the feasibility of stomach temperature  
telemetry for measuring nursing behavior was tested in wild harbor  
seal pups from the St. Lawrence River Estuary. Fifteen pups were  
outfitted with time-depth recorders, stomach temperature transmitters  
(STT), and stomach temperature recorders in 2002 and 2003. Twelve pups  
were recaptured, and seven yielded usable stomach temperature data.  
Excluding a mortality that lost its transmitter the day of release,  
transmitter retention time ranged from at least 7 to 22 d (12.5 ± 1.45  
d) based on a STT signal at recapture. Pups that gained more weight  
had a higher frequency of decreases in stomach temperature (DST) (R2 =  
0.954, p < 0.001). Depth and external temperature data showed that  
most DST occurred while pups were “in the water” (57%) followed by  
“just before or after hauling out” (19%), “just before or after  
entering the water” (15%), and “hauled out” (9%) (χ2 = 56.376, p  
< 0.001). The frequency DST did not change with age, and there was no  
diel pattern of DST, which also did not change with age. These  
findings indicate that transmitter retention times are sufficient to  
monitor most of the nursing period for harbor seals, that stomach  
temperature can be used to quantify nursing characteristics in the  
field, and that a telemetric technique is needed for harbor seals as  
most nursing events occur in the water.

Short Notes - No abstracts

Yoshida, H., Higashi, N., Ono, H., & Uchida, S. (2010). Finless  
porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) discovered at Okinawa Island,  
Japan, with the source population inferred from mitochondrial DNA.  
Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 278-283.
E-mail: hideka at fra.affrc.go.jp

Aliaga-Rossel, E., Beerman, A. S., & Sarmiento, J. (2010). Stomach  
content of a juvenile Bolivian river dolphin (Inia geoffrensis  
boliviensis) from the Upper Madeira Basin, Bolivia. Aquatic Mammals,  
36(3), 284-287.
E-mail: enzo at hawaii.edu

Olavarría, C., Acevedo, J., Vester, H. I., Zamorano-Abramson, J.,  
Viddi, F. A., Gibbons, J., et al. (2010). Southernmost distribution of  
common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Eastern South  
Pacific. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 288-293.
E-mail: carlitos.olavarria at gmail.com

Di Francesco, C. E.,  Marsilio, F., Proietto, U., Mignone, W.,  
Casalone, C., & Di Guardo, G. (2010). Anti-morbillivirus antibodies in  
stranded striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba): Time and  
temperature dependent fluctuations. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 294-297.
E-mail: gdiguardo at unite.it

Lanyon, J. M.,  Sneath, H. L., & Long, T. (2010). Three skin sampling  
methods for molecular characterisation of free-ranging Dugong (Dugong  
dugon) populations. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 298-306.
E-mail: j.lanyon at uq.edu.au

Naito Y. (2010). What is “bio-logging”? (Historical Perspectives).  
Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 307-322.

Obituary for Kenneth Lee Marten, Ph.D. (2010). Aquatic Mammals, 36(3),  
323-325.

Letter to the Editor

Baird, R. W. (2010). Pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) or false  
killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens)? Identification of a group of  
small cetaceans seen off Ecuador in 2003 (Letter to the Editor).  
Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 326-327.


From: Kathleen M. Dudzinski [mailto:kdudzinski at dolphincommunicationproject.org 
]
Sent: maandag 20 september 2010 22:21
To: Justin Gregg Ph.D., Ph.D.
Subject: Aquatic Mammals 36.3 available online

J - please look through below and let me know if you see any glitches.

Otherwise, I will send it out to MARMAM and ECSTalk

Thanks

K



Dear MARMAM and ECS-talk subscribers,

Apologies to those of you who will receive duplicate emails due to  
cross-posting. The following are abstracts from the most recent issue  
(Volume 36, issue 3, 2010) ofAquatic Mammals.

Aquatic Mammals is the longest running peer-reviewed journal dedicated  
to research on aquatic mammals and is published quarterly with  
manuscripts available as published PDFs in real time. Further  
information about the journal can be found at: http://www.aquaticmammalsjournal.org/

Instructions for authors and formatting guidelines can be found in the  
first volume of each issue and at this link: http://tinyurl.com/AMauthorinstructions

To submit a manuscript for publication consideration, please visit: http://am.expressacademic.org/actions/author.php

If you subscribe to Aquatic Mammals online, you can visit Ingenta  
Connect to download all articles from this volume: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/eaam/am

Please do not contact the listserve editors for PDFs or copies of the  
articles. To obtain a PDF, please subscribe to Aquatic Mammals http://tinyurl.com/AMsubscribe 
  or contact the corresponding author for reprints.

Thank you for your continued interest in the journal and abstract  
postings.

With regards,

Kathleen Dudzinski, Ph.D.
Editor, Aquatic Mammals
aquaticmammals at gmail.com

Aragones, L. V., Roque, M. A., Flores, M. B., Encomienda, R. P.,  
Laule, G. E., Espinos, B. G., et al. (2010). The Philippine marine  
mammal strandings from 1998 to 2009: Animals in the Philippines in  
peril? Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 219-233.
E-mail: lemdva2001 at yahoo.com

Abstract
A well-maintained marine mammal stranding database can be an  
invaluable tool in understanding not only strandings but also changes  
in the marine
environment. This study aimed to examine the following aspects of  
marine mammal strandings in the Philippines: species composition,  
temporal (i.e.,
frequency of stranding per year and seasonality) and spatial (i.e.,  
frequency of stranding per region and province) variation, proportions  
of alive or dead
specimens, and stranding hotspots. In 2008, a systematic collection of  
data on strandings, including out-of-habitat incidents, resulted in an  
initial 12-year
database—from 1998 to 2009. A total of 178 stranding events were  
recorded: 163 single, 10 mass, and 5 out-of-habitat strandings, with  
an average of 15
observed stranding events annually. Twenty-three of the 28 confirmed  
species of marine mammals in the Philippines were recorded to strand,  
including
first-recorded specimens for the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin  
(Tursiops aduncus), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), and  
Longman’s beaked
whale (Indopacetus pacificus). The top five most frequent species to  
strand included spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) (n = 26),  
short-finned
pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) (n = 14), melon-headed whale  
(Peponocephala electra) (n = 13), Risso’s dolphin (Grampus griseus)  
(n =
11), and common bottlenose dolphin (T. truncatus) (n = 10). Dugongs  
(Dugong dugon) stranded seven times since 2001. Strandings occurred  
throughout
the year with frequency significantly peaking during the northeast  
(NE) monsoon (November to March) season. Overall, Regions III (Central
Luzon) and VII (Central Visayas) had the highest number of strandings  
(both n = 27) followed by Regions I (Ilocos) (n = 22) and V (Bicol) (n  
= 18).
The following provinces or local government units were considered  
hotspots based on high number of strandings observed at each area:  
Zambales, Cagayan, Zamboanga City, Negros Oriental, Bohol, Pangasinan,  
and Bataan. Sixty-five percent of all documented stranding events  
involved live (n = 116) animals. This high percentage might be linked  
to dynamite fishing (causing acoustic trauma), fisheries interactions,  
or biotoxins from harmful algal blooms coupled to their foodweb. These  
strandings in general validate the diverse marine mammal assemblage in  
the Philippines and reveal the various environmental threats with  
which they deal.

Twiss, S. D., & Franklin, J. (2010). Individually consistent  
behavioural patterns in wild,
breeding male grey seals (Halichoerus grypus). Aquatic Mammals, 36(3),  
234-238.
E-mail: s.d.twiss at durham.ac.uk

Abstract
Recent research demonstrates remarkable consistency in interindividual  
differences in behaviour patterns across time or across situations  
indicating that within populations, individuals have different  
behavioural types or personalities. Examples of behavioural  
consistency have been shown in taxa ranging from molluscs to mammals.  
However, there remain few such studies of wild populations and none of  
pinnipeds. This study presents preliminary evidence of behavioural  
types in wild male grey seals (Halichoerus grypus). Activity budget  
analyses revealed highly repeatable individual patterns of alertness  
across successive breeding seasons unrelated to local environmental  
context. While field studies of behavioural types can be challenging,  
it is essential to develop techniques for identifying behavioural  
types in natural populations in order to begin to understand the  
ecological and evolutionary relevance of animal personalities.

Kvadsheim, P. H., Sevaldsen, E. M., Folkow, L. P., &  Blix, A. S.  
(2010). Behavioural and physiological responses of hooded seals
(Cystophora cristata) to 1 to 7 kHz sonar signals. Aquatic Mammals,  
36(3), 239-247.
E-mail: phk at ffi.no

Abstract
Controlled exposure experiments on captive hooded seals (Cystophora  
cristata) were made to examine behavioural and physiological effects  
of sonar signals. The animals were instrumented with data loggers  
recording heart rate, dive depth, and swimming activity, and then  
released into a 1,200 m3 net-cage in the ocean. The exposure consisted  
of three different 1-s sonar signals covering the 1 to 7 kHz band  
transmitted either by using 10-s inter-ping intervals and gradually  
increasing source level from 134 to 194 dBRMS (re 1 μPa @1 m) within 6  
min, or using the maximum source level of 194 dBRMS from the first  
ping but gradually
decreasing the inter-ping intervals from 100 s to 10 s within 10 min  
(duty cycle increasing from 1 to 10%). Transmission loss from the  
source to the animal varied from 10 to 27 dB, depending on the exact  
location within the net-cage and the transmitted frequency. The  
animals responded to the initial (10% duty cycle) exposure with  
avoidance to signals above 160 to 170 dBRMS (re 1 μPa) received  
levels. This involved reduced diving activity, commencement of rapid  
exploratory swimming at surface, and eventually displacement to areas  
of least sound pressure level. However, already upon the second  
exposure, the initial rapid swimming activity was absent, while the  
reduction in diving activity became even more pronounced. No  
differences were found in behavioural response to different  
transmitted frequencies. Increased heart rate at the surface indicates  
emotional activation during sonar exposure, but lack of effect of  
sonar exposure on heart rate during diving indicates that  
physiological responses to diving remain intact.

Sweeney, J. C., Stone, R., Campbell, M., McBain, J., St. Leger, J.,  
Xitco, M., et al. (2010). Comparative survivability of Tursiops  
neonates from three U.S. institutions for the decades 1990-1999 and  
2000-2009. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 248-261.
E-mail: jsweeney at dolphinquest.com

Abstract
Animal managers from three institutions that hold Tursiops truncatus  
participated in a workshop directed at documenting survivability of  
Tursiops neonates (birth to 30 d of age) in their managed populations.  
Key information was generated for the period 1990 through 2009 for the  
three organizations. Included in the findings are (1) documentation of  
the total live births, total fatalities, and causal factors of neonate  
losses; (2) recommendations for optimizing animal management  
procedures through standardized monitoring and husbandry intervention  
techniques, resulting in the best possible survivability of neonates;  
and (3) comparison of neonate survivability between the years 1990 to  
1999 (78.2% of live births) and 2000 to 2009 (90.6% of live births),  
the latter decade representing progressing improvements in  
survivability resulting from recommended animal management procedures.

Jeglinski, J. W. E., Mueller, B., Pörschmann, U., & Trillmich, F.  
(2010). Field-based age estimation of juvenile Galapagos sea lions
(Zalophus wollebaeki) using morphometric measurements. Aquatic  
Mammals, 36(3), 262-269.
E-mail: jjeglinski at uni-bielefeld.de

Abstract
Information about the age of juvenile pinnipeds is necessary for an  
understanding of ontogeny-specific patterns and strategies. Exact age  
determination of juvenile cohorts from wild populations is best  
achieved through birth observations and subsequent marking, but this  
involves a considerable time lag during which juveniles mature. A  
combination of body and teeth measurements of known-age Galapagos sea  
lion juveniles taken during brief routine captures in the field was  
used to create age prediction models. Several general linear models  
(GLMs) produced reliable age estimates for male and female juveniles  
up to an age of 2 y. Teeth measurements were important predictors of  
age: male age was best estimated using upper canine length (CL), mass,  
and girth, while the best predictors for female age were CL, canine  
width (CW), body length (SL), body mass, and an interaction between CL  
and CW. The presented method of aging wild unmarked juveniles in the  
field is applicable during routine captures, requires little  
equipment, and yields a considerable increase of information for  
studies involving brief sampling periods in the field. We suggest its  
adjustment, testing, and application in studies of juveniles of other  
species.

Schreer, J. F.,  Lapierre, J. L., & Hammill, M. O. (2010). Stomach  
temperature telemetry reveals that harbor seal
(Phoca vitulina) pups primarily nurse in the water. Aquatic Mammals,  
36(3), 270-277.
E-mail: schreejf at potsdam.edu

Abstract
Research on a captive harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) mother-pup pair  
showed that ingestion of milk caused a decrease in stomach temperature  
(Hedd et al., 1995). Herein the feasibility of stomach temperature  
telemetry for measuring nursing behavior was tested in wild harbor  
seal pups from the St. Lawrence River Estuary. Fifteen pups were  
outfitted with time-depth recorders, stomach temperature transmitters  
(STT), and stomach temperature recorders in 2002 and 2003. Twelve pups  
were recaptured, and seven yielded usable stomach temperature data.  
Excluding a mortality that lost its transmitter the day of release,  
transmitter retention time ranged from at least 7 to 22 d (12.5 ± 1.45  
d) based on a STT signal at recapture. Pups that gained more weight  
had a higher frequency of decreases in stomach temperature (DST) (R2 =  
0.954, p < 0.001). Depth and external temperature data showed that  
most DST occurred while pups were “in the water” (57%) followed by  
“just before or after hauling out” (19%), “just before or after  
entering the water” (15%), and “hauled out” (9%) (χ2 = 56.376, p  
< 0.001). The frequency DST did not change with age, and there was no  
diel pattern of DST, which also did not change with age. These  
findings indicate that transmitter retention times are sufficient to  
monitor most of the nursing period for harbor seals, that stomach  
temperature can be used to quantify nursing characteristics in the  
field, and that a telemetric technique is needed for harbor seals as  
most nursing events occur in the water.

Short Notes - No abstracts

Yoshida, H., Higashi, N., Ono, H., & Uchida, S. (2010). Finless  
porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) discovered at Okinawa Island,  
Japan, with the source population inferred from mitochondrial DNA.  
Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 278-283.
E-mail: hideka at fra.affrc.go.jp

Aliaga-Rossel, E., Beerman, A. S., & Sarmiento, J. (2010). Stomach  
content of a juvenile Bolivian river dolphin (Inia geoffrensis
boliviensis) from the Upper Madeira Basin, Bolivia. Aquatic Mammals,  
36(3), 284-287.
E-mail: enzo at hawaii.edu

Olavarría, C., Acevedo, J., Vester, H. I., Zamorano-Abramson, J.,  
Viddi, F. A., Gibbons, J., et al. (2010). Southernmost distribution of  
common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Eastern South  
Pacific. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 288-293.
E-mail: carlitos.olavarria at gmail.com

Di Francesco, C. E.,  Marsilio, F., Proietto, U., Mignone, W.,  
Casalone, C., & Di Guardo, G. (2010). Anti-morbillivirus antibodies in  
stranded striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba): Time and  
temperature dependent fluctuations. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 294-297.
E-mail: gdiguardo at unite.it

Lanyon, J. M.,  Sneath, H. L., & Long, T. (2010). Three skin sampling  
methods for molecular characterisation of free-ranging Dugong (Dugong  
dugon) populations. Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 298-306.
E-mail: j.lanyon at uq.edu.au

Naito Y. (2010). What is “bio-logging”? (Historical Perspectives).  
Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 307-322.
Obituary for Kenneth Lee Marten, Ph.D. (2010). Aquatic Mammals, 36(3),  
323-325.

Letter to the Editor
Baird, R. W. (2010). Pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) or false  
killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens)? Identification of a group of  
small cetaceans seen off Ecuador in 2003 (Letter to the Editor).  
Aquatic Mammals, 36(3), 326-327.
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