[MARMAM] SPONDYLITIC CHANGES IN LONG-FINNED PILOT WHALES pdf available

Michael Moore mmoore at whoi.edu
Mon Feb 27 11:37:27 PST 2006


A pdf of the following is available from mmoore at whoi.edu
 
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(4), 2005, pp. 717–727

SPONDYLITIC CHANGES IN LONG-FINNED PILOT WHALES
(GLOBICEPHALA MELAS) STRANDED ON CAPE COD,
MASSACHUSETTS, USA, BETWEEN 1982 AND 2000
Melinda M. Sweeny,1 Janet M. Price,2 Gwilym S. Jones,3 Thomas W. French,4 Greg A. Early,1
and Michael J. Moore1,5
1 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA
2 Sepracor, Inc., 84 Waterford Dr., Marlborough, Massachusetts 01752, USA
3 Northeastern University, Biology Department, 650 Huntington Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
4 Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough, Massachusetts 01581, USA
5 Corresponding author (email: mmoorewhoi.edu)
ABSTRACT: The primary bone pathology diagnoses recognized in cetacea are osteomyelitis and
spondylosis deformans. In this study, we determined the prevalence, type, and severity of vertebral
pathology in 52 pilot whales, a mass stranding species that stranded on Cape Cod, Massachusetts,
between 1982 and 2000. Eleven whales (21%) had hyperostosis and ossification of
tendon insertion points on and between vertebrae, chevron bones, and costovertebral joints, with
multiple fused blocks of vertebrae. These lesions are typical of a group of interrelated diseases
described in humans as spondyloarthropathies, specifically ankylosing spondylitis, which has not
been fully described in cetacea. In severe cases, ankylosing spondylitis in humans can inhibit
mobility. If the lesions described here negatively affect the overall health of the whale, these
lesions may be a contributing factor in stranding of this highly sociable species.

-- 
Michael Moore
Biology Department Mailstop 50
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Woods Hole MA 02543 USA
508 289 3228 t
508 457 2089 f
www.whoi.edu/people/mmoore






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