[ilds] ILDS Digest, Vol 114, Issue 6

Richard Pine pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com
Thu Oct 6 01:29:19 PDT 2016


I don't think any westerner will be able to appreciate the Quintet as fully
as an adept (I choose the word deliberately) of the eastern philosophies.
We may appreciate his intentions, but not the texts themselves. I do not
think LD was steeped in the literature of Buddhism (which I think, judging
by his library, was his main interest) but he had acquired enough
superficial understanding to know how to bend it to his purpose - the
'Tibetan novel' - and thus to puzzle those of us who are adepts (if we
are!) of the narrative tradition. LD was not the only writer to believe
that Pythagoras etc and the Greek philosophers generally, were of eastern
origin in their cosmologies - there is a strong argument, for just one
example, that Irish traditional music has more than superficial affinities
with musical traditions from Egypt which are demonstrably of oriental
origin. But that is something which most people in the western world are
incapable of discussing with any intelligence. All one can hope to do is to
observe and, if suitable, interpolate, but not to dissect or pontificate. I
am happy to be hidebound by my (inevitably) western education - LD always
hankered after the education he might have had if his childhood had led him
otherwhere than it did. And he DID want to revisit India - when his friend
Ray Mills worked in Sikkim for the WHO, there was a possibility of a
British Council tour there for LD, but it came to nothing - my sources for
this are a letter to me from LD and a conversation in Corfu with Ray Mills
- but then, they may have been telling me a monstrous lie, n'est pas?
RP

On Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 8:18 AM, Ravi Nambiar <cnncravi at gmail.com> wrote:

> Dear R. P and Bruce
> Even if we admit that what Durrell says cannot be accepted as true, they
> can be proved right or wrong by going through the materials he left behind.
> In India, where D was born, I have no access to them. In fact, Isabelle
> Keller-Privat helped me by sending the copies of some Buddhist texts scored
> by Durrell, and I will remain indebted to her even beyond my present life.
> What I am coming to is, according to my finding, it was neither Kipling nor
> Forster who showed D the real passage to India. I admit Forster was helpful
> to Durrell in discovering Aalexandria. I quote Durrell: "when I went to
> Greece: it was to return to India, because I sensed that I'd lost something
> and I wanted to recover the thread of it. Thus, as soon I was free I began
> just exactly like a pilgrim: I discovered the ancient philosophers
> (Pythagoras and company are really Indians!). I experienced a philosophic
> relief in rediscovering the Indians through the Greeks, because the Greek
> were poets." So, Durrell had gone beyond Forster, and Kipling (for whom
> Indians were a "burden"). I think he was able to reach out to the
> Upanishads, and to Sankara's illusionism (as Anand suspected). I am sure
> about one thing: D would not have thought of India as a metaphor, if he had
> not gone to Greece. D is closer to Huxley than Kipling or Forster. Huxley's
> perennial philosophy has its echo throughout the Quintet. Also, I believe
> that Campbell's theory of a modern hero, a passively active hero, delighted
> Durrell. He very deliberately avoided the name of Krishnamoorthy (except to
> Miller) anywhere in his interviews, but, K is present both in the Quartet
> and the Quintet. I feel that someone should probe D's relationship with
> Carlos and Krishnamoorthy.
> One more quote, please: "So all the Mediterranean are contaminated by
> Hinduism. I have attempted in my books to use the yeast of religion without
> breathing the word because we have bypassed it".
> Regards
> Ravi
>
> On Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 5:47 AM, <ilds-request at lists.uvic.ca> wrote:
>
>> Send ILDS mailing list submissions to
>>         ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>
>> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
>>         https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
>>         ilds-request at lists.uvic.ca
>>
>> You can reach the person managing the list at
>>         ilds-owner at lists.uvic.ca
>>
>> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
>> than "Re: Contents of ILDS digest..."
>>
>>
>> Today's Topics:
>>
>>    1. Re: Kipling's Kim v. Forster's Passage (Richard Pine)
>>    2. Blog post on Durrell & Cyprus (James Gifford)
>>    3. Re: Kipling's Kim v. Forster's Passage (Bruce Redwine)
>>    4. Chang-Durrell (Richard Pine)
>>    5. Re: Jolan Chang (Kennedy Gammage)
>>    6. Fwd: CENTRE POMPIDOU - ART ET LIBERT? : RUPTURE, GUERRE ET
>>       SURR?ALISME EN ?GYPTE (1938 -1948) - 19 OCTOBRE 2016 - 16 JANVIER
>>       2017 (MarcPiel)
>>
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 1
>> Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2016 22:05:48 +0300
>> From: Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>
>> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>> Subject: Re: [ilds] Kipling's Kim v. Forster's Passage
>> Message-ID:
>>         <CAEVum0KQT6FquB2gyJr22TM0xkdzrKy3sT3mWr+o0MZ=k1=y9A at mail.gm
>> ail.com>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>>
>> As Thomas Wolfe says, ?You can?t go home again.?
>> Also, think of "the boy who left home will have to meet the man who
>> returns"
>> But I continue to argue that Kipling meant more to LD than Forster ever
>> could, because Kipling's 'India' was felt, whereas Forster's 'India', like
>> his 'Alexandria', was intuited. To rely on the latter is perilously close
>> to prioritising theory over that which is theoritised - which is one of
>> the
>> great sins (alright, moral errors) of modern academe.
>> Yes, Elephant's Back bends the truth - have you forgotten that LD was a) a
>> poet and b) a storyteller? And what man can accurately recall childhood?
>> If
>> LD had written "Boom of the sunset gun / In the old fortress of Kurseong"
>> would you object, because there IS no fortress at Kurseong?
>> RP
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 9:34 PM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>> >
>> wrote:
>>
>> > I don?t disagree that India ?meant? a lot to Durrell.  But I think we
>> need
>> > to distinguish between the dreamy glow of childhood experiences (? la
>> > Wordsworth?s 1799 *Prelude*) and the deep reflections of a mature man (?
>> > la Wordsworth?s ?Intimations Ode?).  There?s a reason Durrell never
>> > returned to India (or reluctantly returned to Egypt)?I would guess that
>> he
>> > didn?t want to disturb or destroy some cherished memories, which, after
>> > all, is common to all us.  As Thomas Wolfe says, ?You can?t go home
>> again.?
>> >  E. M. Forster?s India, in my opinion, is closer to the India of mature
>> > Durrell, philosophic Durrell.  When Durrell talked about the India of
>> his
>> > childhood, as in his essay ?From the Elephant?s Back? (1982), his
>> > recollections are full of fabrications.  *That* India is, in part at
>> > least, a Romantic dream.  Take the first lines of ?Le circle referm?,?
>> one
>> > of Durrell?s last poems:  ?Boom of the sunset gun / In the old fortress
>> at
>> > Benares.?  That very moving poem, which has the appearance of an
>> > autobiographical summation of a life, begins in Benares, India.  If I?m
>> not
>> > mistaken, Durrell the child was *never* in Benares.  He was dreaming
>> that
>> > experience, and we all know how important dreams are to Durrell.
>> >
>> > Bruce
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > On Oct 5, 2016, at 9:36 AM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > "Yes, Durrell identified with Kipling?s *Kim* as a model for his boyhood
>> > experiences in India.  That?s Romanticism on a superficial level?that?s
>> > postcard India."
>> > Absolutely not! If it was a postcard, it was a postcard born inside his
>> > head - a veritable smile in his mind's eye. It wasn't at all romantic,
>> with
>> > or without a capital 'R' and it wasn't in the slightest superficial.
>> India
>> > MEANT something to him at first-hand and it imbued his entire life and
>> > life-vision. Read what he wrote about the lamas in his introduction to
>> the
>> > (first) biog of Alexandra David-Neel by the Foster couple.
>> > RP
>> >
>> > On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 7:04 PM, Bruce Redwine <
>> bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> >> Yes, Durrell identified with Kipling?s *Kim* as a model for his boyhood
>> >> experiences in India.  That?s Romanticism on a superficial level?that?s
>> >> postcard India.  As Rick points out, Kipling also taught Durrell a lot
>> >> about storytelling?and both are expert storytellers.  But I would argue
>> >> that Forster?s *Passage to India* provided a more profound model for
>> the
>> >> Indian ?metaphysics? Durrell later explored in his allegorical fiction.
>> >>  (Forster?s *Alexandria* and *Pharos and Pharillon* also fit in here.)
>> >>  This is the India Ravi Nambiar discusses.  Consider Forster?s opening
>> to
>> >> *Passage*?the Marabar Caves and whatever it is that happens inside
>> >> them.  Durrell uses caves to similar effect in *The Dark Labyrinth* and
>> >> the *Quintet*.  Those kinds of mysterious or mystical experiences
>> >> permeate his work.
>> >>
>> >> Bruce
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Oct 4, 2016, at 11:03 PM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>
>> >> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> I think what continued to resonate with LD about "Kim" was the fact
>> that
>> >> like Kipling LD had been born there and as we know deeply resented
>> 'losing'
>> >> his Indian childhood; that Kim was, as LD supposed himself to be,
>> >> Anglo-Irish; and that he had known something of Kim's early years -
>> Walsh
>> >> in Pied Piper of Lovers has a lot in common with Kim. On the other
>> hand,
>> >> Forster was a 'travel writer' in India and however much he empathised
>> with
>> >> Indians, he didn't have that background. See what LD says about Kim,
>> quoted
>> >> in my book "Mindscape" (readable online on the DLC website - pp. 43-46
>> and
>> >> 123-126 especially).
>> >> RP
>> >>
>> >> On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 1:29 AM, Bruce Redwine <
>> bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>> >> > wrote:
>> >>
>> >>> Richard, you?ve mentioned Kipling?s *Kim* before in this context.
>> I?ll
>> >>> have to reread it in the way you suggest.  I must have missed
>> something,
>> >>> but I can imagine what Said probably said.  I wonder why Durrell
>> didn?t
>> >>> keep Forster?s *Passage to India* as a ?bedside book.?  It seems
>> >>> equally relevant.  Forster, by the way, didn?t like Durrell and his
>> brand
>> >>> of Romanticism and didn?t say nice things about him in private.
>> Durrell,
>> >>> on the other hand, was very gracious towards E. M.
>> >>>
>> >>> Bruce
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>> Rick Schoff on 10/5/2016:
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >> I'm reading "Kim" for the first time as an adult. It's not hard to see
>> >> the east/west contrast. I imagine LD loved the boisterous and colorful
>> >> aspects of it (is this part and parcel of the "romanticism" Forster
>> didn't
>> >> like?). Also, I think, the idea of a "Great Game" as the armature and
>> >> animator of a story impressed Durrell. I first read the Quartet for its
>> >> overall lushness and the interactions and thoughts of the characters.
>> But
>> >> "Palestine" ruled over all the action, gave shape and defined the
>> >> parameters of the story. In the Quintet it's the Templars and their
>> rumored
>> >> treasure. In addition to other aspects, I think "Kim" taught Durrell
>> some
>> >> key lessons about pure story-telling. Sure, "Kim" might be just a boy's
>> >> adventure book (how it was first presented to me), but both elements
>> are in
>> >> there: good story-telling and depiction of different world views.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Oct 4, 2016, at 6:29 PM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
>> >> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Richard, you?ve mentioned Kipling?s *Kim* before in this context.  I?ll
>> >> have to reread it in the way you suggest.  I must have missed
>> something,
>> >> but I can imagine what Said probably said.  I wonder why Durrell didn?t
>> >> keep Forster?s *Passage to India* as a ?bedside book.?  It seems
>> equally
>> >> relevant.  Forster, by the way, didn?t like Durrell and his brand of
>> >> Romanticism and didn?t say nice things about him in private.  Durrell,
>> on
>> >> the other hand, was very gracious towards E. M.
>> >>
>> >> Bruce
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Oct 4, 2016, at 2:29 PM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>
>> >> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> To appreciate the east-west tension in LD - and particularly the
>> Quintet
>> >> - it's helpful to look at Kipling's *Kim* - which LD called his
>> 'bedside
>> >> book' - and to look also at the ways western critics have tried to
>> engage
>> >> with this tension - and then to look at the ways non-western critics
>> like
>> >> Said and Chaudhuri have read *Kim*.
>> >> RP
>> >>
>> >> On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 12:19 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlin
>> >> k.net> wrote:
>> >>
>> >>> Ravi,
>> >>>
>> >>> I like the contrast between Durrell?s *Constance* and Tennyson?s
>> >>> ?Ulysses?:  to yield v. not to yield.  I think you?re absolutely
>> right in
>> >>> this.  That?s the Indian metaphysics of Durrell?s philosophy, which
>> is very
>> >>> un-Western.  As to the rest of the *Quintet,* it has so many aspects
>> >>> (and defects) that readers will be puzzling over these for years to
>> come.
>> >>> I don?t think, however, that Durrell himself was ever ?happy.?  In
>> this
>> >>> regard, he was Odyssean, ?to strive, to seek, to find, and not to
>> yield.?
>> >>>  What he advocated was not necessarily what he practiced.
>> >>>
>> >>> Bruce
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> On Sep 28, 2016, at 8:14 PM, Ravi Nambiar <cnncravi at gmail.com> wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>> Bruce
>> >>> Thanks for your expert comments. You are hundred percent right.* The
>> >>> Quintet* may/will get the fate of *The Revolt*. I don't speak
>> >>> authoritatively at all. I am a humble admirer of Durrell. I just
>> quoted
>> >>> Durrell's own words (so that I can escape) only to show that he had
>> not
>> >>> anticipated a Quartet-type audience for his Quintet ("The book is
>> >>> really written for learned people."); and, in spite of that, he
>> claimed
>> >>> this novel his best. My only contention is that it is too early to
>> write
>> >>> off this novel as a failure. Also, there are some fine parts which our
>> >>> young scholars could/should pursue. Our negative (final) judgement
>> should
>> >>> not, I feel, discourage anyone from going into its by-lanes. For
>> example, I
>> >>> liked the contrast Durrell made to the concept of Victorian heroism
>> with
>> >>> a/the modern heroism: replacing the slogan, "to strive, to seek, to
>> find
>> >>> and not to yield" with the slogan, "to surrender, to yield, to
>> abdicate and
>> >>> receive" (*Constance* 269). I don't think substituting the  heroism of
>> >>> Ulysses with that of a Yogi is any kind of philosophy or a bad
>> philosophy.
>> >>> Yoga is popular now. Durrell's concern was to make his character seek
>> >>> happiness, inner happiness, a kind of"bliss-side up" life (the first
>> half
>> >>> of the novel was the war-ridden world). That is why I called his novel
>> >>> "Eudaemonistic" novel, the type of novel making its theme as a system
>> of
>> >>>  ethics that evaluates actions (heroism) in terms of their capacity
>> to produce
>> >>> happiness. The Quintet may be a failure, but, it certainly gives some
>> >>> narrative clues to future writers. We have had enough of realism,
>> >>> surrealism, magic realism, and so on. Why not try metarealism also?
>> >>> My apology to all those who disagree with me. Let us agree to disagree
>> >>> for the sake of literature.
>> >>> Best
>> >>> Ravi
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>>
>> >>> On Oct 4, 2016, at 2:29 PM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>
>> >>> wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>> To appreciate the east-west tension in LD - and particularly the
>> Quintet
>> >>> - it's helpful to look at Kipling's *Kim* - which LD called his
>> >>> 'bedside book' - and to look also at the ways western critics have
>> tried to
>> >>> engage with this tension - and then to look at the ways non-western
>> critics
>> >>> like Said and Chaudhuri have read *Kim*.
>> >>> RP
>> >>>
>> >>> On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 12:19 AM, Bruce Redwine <
>> >>> bredwine1968 at earthlink.net> wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>> Ravi,
>> >>>>
>> >>>> I like the contrast between Durrell?s *Constance* and Tennyson?s
>> >>>> ?Ulysses?:  to yield v. not to yield.  I think you?re absolutely
>> right in
>> >>>> this.  That?s the Indian metaphysics of Durrell?s philosophy, which
>> is very
>> >>>> un-Western.  As to the rest of the *Quintet,* it has so many aspects
>> >>>> (and defects) that readers will be puzzling over these for years to
>> come.
>> >>>> I don?t think, however, that Durrell himself was ever ?happy.?  In
>> this
>> >>>> regard, he was Odyssean, ?to strive, to seek, to find, and not to
>> yield.?
>> >>>>  What he advocated was not necessarily what he practiced.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Bruce
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> On Sep 28, 2016, at 8:14 PM, Ravi Nambiar <cnncravi at gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Bruce
>> >>>> Thanks for your expert comments. You are hundred percent right.* The
>> >>>> Quintet* may/will get the fate of *The Revolt*. I don't speak
>> >>>> authoritatively at all. I am a humble admirer of Durrell. I just
>> quoted
>> >>>> Durrell's own words (so that I can escape) only to show that he had
>> not
>> >>>> anticipated a Quartet-type audience for his Quintet ("The book is
>> >>>> really written for learned people."); and, in spite of that, he
>> >>>> claimed this novel his best. My only contention is that it is too
>> early to
>> >>>> write off this novel as a failure. Also, there are some fine parts
>> which
>> >>>> our young scholars could/should pursue. Our negative (final)
>> judgement
>> >>>> should not, I feel, discourage anyone from going into its by-lanes.
>> For
>> >>>> example, I liked the contrast Durrell made to the concept of
>> Victorian
>> >>>> heroism with a/the modern heroism: replacing the slogan, "to strive,
>> to
>> >>>> seek, to find and not to yield" with the slogan, "to surrender, to
>> yield,
>> >>>> to abdicate and receive" (*Constance* 269). I don't think
>> substituting
>> >>>> the  heroism of Ulysses with that of a Yogi is any kind of
>> philosophy or a
>> >>>> bad philosophy. Yoga is popular now. Durrell's concern was to make
>> his
>> >>>> character seek happiness, inner happiness, a kind of"bliss-side up"
>> life
>> >>>> (the first half of the novel was the war-ridden world). That is why I
>> >>>> called his novel "Eudaemonistic" novel, the type of novel making its
>> theme
>> >>>> as a system of ethics that evaluates actions (heroism) in terms of
>> >>>> their capacity to produce happiness. The Quintet may be a failure,
>> >>>> but, it certainly gives some narrative clues to future writers. We
>> have had
>> >>>> enough of realism, surrealism, magic realism, and so on. Why not try
>> >>>> metarealism also?
>> >>>> My apology to all those who disagree with me. Let us agree to
>> disagree
>> >>>> for the sake of literature.
>> >>>> Best
>> >>>> Ravi
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> ILDS mailing list
>> >> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> >> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>> >>
>> >>
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > ILDS mailing list
>> > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > ILDS mailing list
>> > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>> >
>> >
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161005/
>> d7164b7d/attachment-0001.html>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 2
>> Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2016 15:56:19 -0700
>> From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com>
>> To: ILDS Listserv <ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>> Subject: [ilds] Blog post on Durrell & Cyprus
>> Message-ID: <917b249e-7598-3221-67c0-e25dfdbad178 at gmail.com>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>>
>> Dear all,
>>
>> Maria Eliades has a new blog on Durrell's time on Cypus, "The Impact of
>> Expat Writers in Uncertain Times: Lawrence Durrell," which will likely
>> interest people on the listserv:
>>
>> http://blog.pshares.org/index.php/the-impact-of-expat-writer
>> s-in-uncertain-times-lawrence-durrell/
>>
>> The relationship she makes between Durrell's experience and her own in
>> Istanbul today is striking.
>>
>> All best,
>> James
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 3
>> Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2016 14:11:49 -0700
>> From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
>> To: Sumantra Nag <ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>> Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
>> Subject: Re: [ilds] Kipling's Kim v. Forster's Passage
>> Message-ID: <678AC845-2DAE-40EA-A403-CB826AB09A95 at earthlink.net>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>>
>> Richard, I think we?re back to discussing Durrell?s notion of ?Truth.?
>> (Which differs from mine.)  So we have another kind of ?le cercle
>> referm?.?  You?re undoubtedly right that Durrell was chiefly a poet and a
>> storyteller, but I have great trouble when he presents (disguises?) certain
>> works as ?fact? (e.g., Prospero?s Cell or his autobiographical poem, ?Le
>> cercle referm??) and then proceeds to embellish and distort.  Was he aware
>> of what he was doing?  Dunno.  If he was aware, isn?t that the definition
>> of lying?  Does it matter?  Maybe not to many people but to me it does.  In
>> Haag?s City of Memory, Yvette Cohen said (more than less) that Durrell
>> couldn?t be trusted to report accurately.  At the Durrell Celebration in
>> Alexandria (2007), Penelope Durrell Hope said her mother called PC ?all
>> lies.?  It surely wasn?t ?all lies,? but I think a whole lot of fibbing was
>> going on, presumably in the interest of telling a ?good story.?  Yes, if
>> Durrell knew there was no fortress at !
>>  Kurseong but claimed there was, yes, I would object and wonder just what
>> he was up to.  Keats can get ?stout Cortez? wrong in ?Chapman?s Homer,? but
>> no one accuses him of lying.  Keats was simply a bad historian.  Durrell?s
>> ?errors,? if such, are something else again.
>>
>> Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Oct 5, 2016, at 12:05 PM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>> >
>> > As Thomas Wolfe says, ?You can?t go home again.?
>> > Also, think of "the boy who left home will have to meet the man who
>> returns"
>> > But I continue to argue that Kipling meant more to LD than Forster ever
>> could, because Kipling's 'India' was felt, whereas Forster's 'India', like
>> his 'Alexandria', was intuited. To rely on the latter is perilously close
>> to prioritising theory over that which is theoritised - which is one of the
>> great sins (alright, moral errors) of modern academe.
>> > Yes, Elephant's Back bends the truth - have you forgotten that LD was
>> a) a poet and b) a storyteller? And what man can accurately recall
>> childhood? If LD had written "Boom of the sunset gun / In the old fortress
>> of Kurseong" would you object, because there IS no fortress at Kurseong?
>> > RP
>> >
>> > On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 9:34 PM, Bruce Redwine <
>> bredwine1968 at earthlink.net <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>> wrote:
>> > I don?t disagree that India ?meant? a lot to Durrell.  But I think we
>> need to distinguish between the dreamy glow of childhood experiences (? la
>> Wordsworth?s 1799 Prelude) and the deep reflections of a mature man (? la
>> Wordsworth?s ?Intimations Ode?).  There?s a reason Durrell never returned
>> to India (or reluctantly returned to Egypt)?I would guess that he didn?t
>> want to disturb or destroy some cherished memories, which, after all, is
>> common to all us.  As Thomas Wolfe says, ?You can?t go home again.?  E. M.
>> Forster?s India, in my opinion, is closer to the India of mature Durrell,
>> philosophic Durrell.  When Durrell talked about the India of his childhood,
>> as in his essay ?From the Elephant?s Back? (1982), his recollections are
>> full of fabrications.  That India is, in part at least, a Romantic dream.
>> Take the first lines of ?Le circle referm?,? one of Durrell?s last poems:
>> ?Boom of the sunset gun / In the old fortress at Benares.?  That very
>> moving poem, which has the app!
>>  earance of an autobiographical summation of a life, begins in Benares,
>> India.  If I?m not mistaken, Durrell the child was never in Benares.  He
>> was dreaming that experience, and we all know how important dreams are to
>> Durrell.
>> >
>> > Bruce
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >> On Oct 5, 2016, at 9:36 AM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com
>> <mailto:pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> "Yes, Durrell identified with Kipling?s Kim as a model for his boyhood
>> experiences in India.  That?s Romanticism on a superficial level?that?s
>> postcard India."
>> >> Absolutely not! If it was a postcard, it was a postcard born inside
>> his head - a veritable smile in his mind's eye. It wasn't at all romantic,
>> with or without a capital 'R' and it wasn't in the slightest superficial.
>> India MEANT something to him at first-hand and it imbued his entire life
>> and life-vision. Read what he wrote about the lamas in his introduction to
>> the (first) biog of Alexandra David-Neel by the Foster couple.
>> >> RP
>> >>
>> >> On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 7:04 PM, Bruce Redwine <
>> bredwine1968 at earthlink.net <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>> wrote:
>> >> Yes, Durrell identified with Kipling?s Kim as a model for his boyhood
>> experiences in India.  That?s Romanticism on a superficial level?that?s
>> postcard India.  As Rick points out, Kipling also taught Durrell a lot
>> about storytelling?and both are expert storytellers.  But I would argue
>> that Forster?s Passage to India provided a more profound model for the
>> Indian ?metaphysics? Durrell later explored in his allegorical fiction.
>> (Forster?s Alexandria and Pharos and Pharillon also fit in here.)  This is
>> the India Ravi Nambiar discusses.  Consider Forster?s opening to
>> Passage?the Marabar Caves and whatever it is that happens inside them.
>> Durrell uses caves to similar effect in The Dark Labyrinth and the
>> Quintet.  Those kinds of mysterious or mystical experiences permeate his
>> work.
>> >>
>> >> Bruce
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>> On Oct 4, 2016, at 11:03 PM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com
>> <mailto:pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>> wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>> I think what continued to resonate with LD about "Kim" was the fact
>> that like Kipling LD had been born there and as we know deeply resented
>> 'losing' his Indian childhood; that Kim was, as LD supposed himself to be,
>> Anglo-Irish; and that he had known something of Kim's early years - Walsh
>> in Pied Piper of Lovers has a lot in common with Kim. On the other hand,
>> Forster was a 'travel writer' in India and however much he empathised with
>> Indians, he didn't have that background. See what LD says about Kim, quoted
>> in my book "Mindscape" (readable online on the DLC website - pp. 43-46 and
>> 123-126 especially).
>> >>> RP
>> >>>
>> >>> On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 1:29 AM, Bruce Redwine <
>> bredwine1968 at earthlink.net <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>> wrote:
>> >>> Richard, you?ve mentioned Kipling?s Kim before in this context.  I?ll
>> have to reread it in the way you suggest.  I must have missed something,
>> but I can imagine what Said probably said.  I wonder why Durrell didn?t
>> keep Forster?s Passage to India as a ?bedside book.?  It seems equally
>> relevant.  Forster, by the way, didn?t like Durrell and his brand of
>> Romanticism and didn?t say nice things about him in private.  Durrell, on
>> the other hand, was very gracious towards E. M.
>> >>>
>> >>> Bruce
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>>
>> >>> Rick Schoff on 10/5/2016:
>> >>
>> >> I'm reading "Kim" for the first time as an adult. It's not hard to see
>> the east/west contrast. I imagine LD loved the boisterous and colorful
>> aspects of it (is this part and parcel of the "romanticism" Forster didn't
>> like?). Also, I think, the idea of a "Great Game" as the armature and
>> animator of a story impressed Durrell. I first read the Quartet for its
>> overall lushness and the interactions and thoughts of the characters. But
>> "Palestine" ruled over all the action, gave shape and defined the
>> parameters of the story. In the Quintet it's the Templars and their rumored
>> treasure. In addition to other aspects, I think "Kim" taught Durrell some
>> key lessons about pure story-telling. Sure, "Kim" might be just a boy's
>> adventure book (how it was first presented to me), but both elements are in
>> there: good story-telling and depiction of different world views.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Oct 4, 2016, at 6:29 PM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>> <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>> wrote:
>> >>
>> >>> Richard, you?ve mentioned Kipling?s Kim before in this context.  I?ll
>> have to reread it in the way you suggest.  I must have missed something,
>> but I can imagine what Said probably said.  I wonder why Durrell didn?t
>> keep Forster?s Passage to India as a ?bedside book.?  It seems equally
>> relevant.  Forster, by the way, didn?t like Durrell and his brand of
>> Romanticism and didn?t say nice things about him in private.  Durrell, on
>> the other hand, was very gracious towards E. M.
>> >>>
>> >>> Bruce
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>> On Oct 4, 2016, at 2:29 PM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com
>> <mailto:pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>> wrote:
>> >>>>
>> >>>> To appreciate the east-west tension in LD - and particularly the
>> Quintet - it's helpful to look at Kipling's Kim - which LD called his
>> 'bedside book' - and to look also at the ways western critics have tried to
>> engage with this tension - and then to look at the ways non-western critics
>> like Said and Chaudhuri have read Kim.
>> >>>> RP
>> >>>>
>> >>>> On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 12:19 AM, Bruce Redwine <
>> bredwine1968 at earthlink.net <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>> wrote:
>> >>>> Ravi,
>> >>>>
>> >>>> I like the contrast between Durrell?s Constance and Tennyson?s
>> ?Ulysses?:  to yield v. not to yield.  I think you?re absolutely right in
>> this.  That?s the Indian metaphysics of Durrell?s philosophy, which is very
>> un-Western.  As to the rest of the Quintet, it has so many aspects (and
>> defects) that readers will be puzzling over these for years to come.  I
>> don?t think, however, that Durrell himself was ever ?happy.?  In this
>> regard, he was Odyssean, ?to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.?
>> What he advocated was not necessarily what he practiced.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Bruce
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>> On Sep 28, 2016, at 8:14 PM, Ravi Nambiar <cnncravi at gmail.com
>> <mailto:cnncravi at gmail.com>> wrote:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Bruce
>> >>>>> Thanks for your expert comments. You are hundred percent right. The
>> Quintet may/will get the fate of The Revolt. I don't speak authoritatively
>> at all. I am a humble admirer of Durrell. I just quoted Durrell's own words
>> (so that I can escape) only to show that he had not anticipated a
>> Quartet-type audience for his Quintet ("The book is really written for
>> learned people."); and, in spite of that, he claimed this novel his best.
>> My only contention is that it is too early to write off this novel as a
>> failure. Also, there are some fine parts which our young scholars
>> could/should pursue. Our negative (final) judgement should not, I feel,
>> discourage anyone from going into its by-lanes. For example, I liked the
>> contrast Durrell made to the concept of Victorian heroism with a/the modern
>> heroism: replacing the slogan, "to strive, to seek, to find and not to
>> yield" with the slogan, "to surrender, to yield, to abdicate and receive"
>> (Constance 269). I don't think substituting the  !
>>  heroism of Ulysses with that of a Yogi is any kind of philosophy or a
>> bad philosophy. Yoga is popular now. Durrell's concern was to make his
>> character seek happiness, inner happiness, a kind of"bliss-side up" life
>> (the first half of the novel was the war-ridden world). That is why I
>> called his novel "Eudaemonistic" novel, the type of novel making its theme
>> as a system of ethics that evaluates actions (heroism) in terms of their
>> capacity to produce happiness. The Quintet may be a failure, but, it
>> certainly gives some narrative clues to future writers. We have had enough
>> of realism, surrealism, magic realism, and so on. Why not try metarealism
>> also?
>> >>>>> My apology to all those who disagree with me. Let us agree to
>> disagree for the sake of literature.
>> >>>>> Best
>> >>>>> Ravi
>> >>>>>
>> >>>
>> >>> _______________________________________________
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>> On Oct 4, 2016, at 2:29 PM, Richard Pine <pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com
>> <mailto:pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com>> wrote:
>> >>>>
>> >>>> To appreciate the east-west tension in LD - and particularly the
>> Quintet - it's helpful to look at Kipling's Kim - which LD called his
>> 'bedside book' - and to look also at the ways western critics have tried to
>> engage with this tension - and then to look at the ways non-western critics
>> like Said and Chaudhuri have read Kim.
>> >>>> RP
>> >>>>
>> >>>> On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 12:19 AM, Bruce Redwine <
>> bredwine1968 at earthlink.net <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>> wrote:
>> >>>> Ravi,
>> >>>>
>> >>>> I like the contrast between Durrell?s Constance and Tennyson?s
>> ?Ulysses?:  to yield v. not to yield.  I think you?re absolutely right in
>> this.  That?s the Indian metaphysics of Durrell?s philosophy, which is very
>> un-Western.  As to the rest of the Quintet, it has so many aspects (and
>> defects) that readers will be puzzling over these for years to come.  I
>> don?t think, however, that Durrell himself was ever ?happy.?  In this
>> regard, he was Odyssean, ?to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.?
>> What he advocated was not necessarily what he practiced.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Bruce
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>> On Sep 28, 2016, at 8:14 PM, Ravi Nambiar <cnncravi at gmail.com
>> <mailto:cnncravi at gmail.com>> wrote:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Bruce
>> >>>>> Thanks for your expert comments. You are hundred percent right. The
>> Quintet may/will get the fate of The Revolt. I don't speak authoritatively
>> at all. I am a humble admirer of Durrell. I just quoted Durrell's own words
>> (so that I can escape) only to show that he had not anticipated a
>> Quartet-type audience for his Quintet ("The book is really written for
>> learned people."); and, in spite of that, he claimed this novel his best.
>> My only contention is that it is too early to write off this novel as a
>> failure. Also, there are some fine parts which our young scholars
>> could/should pursue. Our negative (final) judgement should not, I feel,
>> discourage anyone from going into its by-lanes. For example, I liked the
>> contrast Durrell made to the concept of Victorian heroism with a/the modern
>> heroism: replacing the slogan, "to strive, to seek, to find and not to
>> yield" with the slogan, "to surrender, to yield, to abdicate and receive"
>> (Constance 269). I don't think substituting the  !
>>  heroism of Ulysses with that of a Yogi is any kind of philosophy or a
>> bad philosophy. Yoga is popular now. Durrell's concern was to make his
>> character seek happiness, inner happiness, a kind of"bliss-side up" life
>> (the first half of the novel was the war-ridden world). That is why I
>> called his novel "Eudaemonistic" novel, the type of novel making its theme
>> as a system of ethics that evaluates actions (heroism) in terms of their
>> capacity to produce happiness. The Quintet may be a failure, but, it
>> certainly gives some narrative clues to future writers. We have had enough
>> of realism, surrealism, magic realism, and so on. Why not try metarealism
>> also?
>> >>>>> My apology to all those who disagree with me. Let us agree to
>> disagree for the sake of literature.
>> >>>>> Best
>> >>>>> Ravi
>> >>>>>
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >>
>>
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161005/
>> e36a34c7/attachment-0001.html>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 4
>> Date: Thu, 6 Oct 2016 00:12:57 +0300
>> From: Richard Pine <durrelllibrarycorfu at gmail.com>
>> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca, Sumantra Nag <sumantranag at gmail.com>,   Denise
>>         Tart <dtart at bigpond.net.au>,    Kennedy Gammage
>>         <gammage.kennedy at gmail.com>
>> Subject: [ilds] Chang-Durrell
>> Message-ID:
>>         <CAHp0D1wvNZsz1PLQjDD0=Hrb-uB6DOCp4=wdz8jYRigykDdOcw at mail.
>> gmail.com>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>>
>> The following is the inventory of letters from Jolan Chang to lawrence
>> Durrell held in the LD collection at the Universitye Paris X (Nanterre)
>>
>> RP
>>
>>
>> Letters from *Jolan Chang* (author of *The Tao of Love and Sex*, publ.
>> April 1977): 1976-1982
>>
>> 1)      ALS May 15 1976 to L.D. in English. Re: sending his book to
>> Wildwood, printing planned for next spring; A. Nin?s *Diaries*. Asks L.D.
>> for choice of title for his book.
>>
>> 2)      ALS April 10 1977 (from Stockholm). Re: his book, just published
>> by
>> Wildwood and related subjects.
>>
>> 3)      ALS: n.d. (early 1977, Feb 28, from Stockholm). Re: Gail Sheehy?s
>> best-selling book *Passages: *she is a Durrell admirer and a devotee of
>> the
>> ancient Chinese Tao of Loving (ref. to p.313 of her book, ?The sexual
>> diamond?, copy enclosed). Concludes: ?knowingly or unknowingly, suddenly
>> all the feminists seem to be on the side of the Tao?! Invites L.D. to
>> discussion on the subject in London with his daughter, Needham and Gail
>> Sheehy. (1 leaf)
>>
>> + A self-introduction: photocopy of MS. (1 leaf)
>>
>> + Photo of J.Chang
>>
>> + Xerox of Wildwood?s ad for *The Tao of Love and Sex* with L.D.?s
>> introduction.
>>
>> 4)      Photocopy of Ms *An Ancient Chinese Secret of Love and Sex* (2
>> leaves).
>>
>> 5)      Photocopy of Ts interview, points 5 to 10 (2 leaves).
>>
>> 6)      ALS: n.d. on letterhead of ?The Royal Swedish Yacht Club? 1977.
>> Re:
>> saving paper (like Needham). Worries about L.D.?s asthma. His book has
>> kept
>> him busy as it is published in 10 countries: ?a success that would
>> surprise
>> women editors at Doubleday?!: so much is due to L.D.?s support and
>> enthusiasm. Re: a TV programme with L.D. and H. Miller. Asks how and where
>> L.D. is going to publish his long essay (*A Smile in the Mind?s Eye*,
>> publ.
>> 1978). (1 leaf)
>>
>> 7)      ALS: n.d. on letterhead of the RSYC, Stockholm 1977. Regrets
>> English is still a foreign language to him. Concern about L.D.?s health.
>> Wishes he could live within ?bicycle distance? of L.D. ?Lao Tse did not
>> think that travel is necessary?: no invasions, no wars, no problems. Does
>> not know how to deal with his US publishers. His health is better and
>> better ?drink 4, 5 glasses of water first thing in the morning?). (1 leaf)
>>
>> 8)      ALS: July 23, 1978 from Stockholm. J.C. shows his pleasure at
>> success of his book. Invites L.D. to stay with him to work together on the
>> subject of the Tao. ?A presumptuous proposal?, he writes. (1 leaf)
>>
>> + Encloses a letter by E.L. Rossi, a specialist in clinical psychology. (1
>> leaf)
>>
>> + part of E.L. Rossi?s curriculum vitae. (1 leaf)
>>
>> 9)      ALS: Dec.7, 1978 from Stockholm. Re: on travelling, writing and
>> keeping one?s wife! Quotes Danish writer Suzanne Br?gger (a prot?g?e of
>> Miller?s) who said ?devoted writers could seldom keep their lovers because
>> writing is a demanding and possessive mistress?. (1 leaf)
>>
>> 10)   ALS: Sept.21, 1982 from Stockholm. Hopes to meet L.D. in Paris.
>> Comes
>> to visit all his publishers in Paris and London. Had a letter from L.D.
>> before his usual tour of Greece. Admits ?a worse letter writer like me is
>> difficult to find?. Does not sound as warm and confident as he used to. (1
>> leaf)
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161006/
>> 4e9e49a7/attachment-0001.html>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 5
>> Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2016 15:21:32 -0700
>> From: Kennedy Gammage <gammage.kennedy at gmail.com>
>> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>> Subject: Re: [ilds] Jolan Chang
>> Message-ID:
>>         <CANDhJnRTgd91JfnOvr4vGE+5dfetAy7LvSNjh9fsQ1ST=RWc7g at mail.
>> gmail.com>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>>
>> As Bill Murray would say, ?that?s a yes.? Jolan Chang, with all his great
>> sexual advice for the priapic old Durrell, must have influenced the
>> <Affad>
>> character in Constance.
>>
>> Which is interesting, because the entangled <Akkad> character, who
>> initiated our friends from Monsieur into the gnostic suicide cult of Ophis
>> the Snake at Macabru ? was not in Constance?s circle or apparently
>> interested in curating his precious fluids. Durrell had already created
>> and
>> published the Akkad character before he met Chang. Yes or no?
>>
>> Which may shed some light on the creative process as the Quintet
>> developed.
>> Or not.
>>
>> Thanks very much - Ken
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Oct 4, 2016 at 3:18 PM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>> >
>> wrote:
>>
>> > Good story!  And probably good advice for all and sundry.  But who
>> follows
>> > it!
>> >
>> > Bruce
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > On Oct 4, 2016, at 3:12 PM, Denise Tart & David Green <
>> > dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>> >
>> > According to G Bowker the Chinese Taoist philosopher and sexologist,
>> with
>> > Durrell had been corresponding, visited him in Sommieres at the
>> beginning
>> > of 1976. At the time Larry was living alone in the gloomy old house in
>> one
>> > or two rooms. Chang said Durrell ejaculated too much and drank too much
>> and
>> > needed to stop drinking and only ejaculate occasionally. I wonder how
>> much
>> > Larry paid him for this advice? Certainly he does not seem to have
>> followed
>> > it.
>> >
>> > David.
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPad
>> >
>> > On 5 Oct 2016, at 4:54 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > Ken,
>> >
>> > Interesting idea, Jolan Chang as ?inspiration? for Affad in *Sebastian.*
>> >  Chang appears at beginning of *A Smile in the Mind?s Eye* (1980).
>> *Sebastian
>> > or Ruling Passions* appears in 1983.  I first thought Chang was another
>> > of Durrell?s inventions?he seemed too improbable.  He was, however, a
>> real
>> > person who wrote *The Tao of Love and Sex:  The Ancient Chinese Way to
>> > Ecstasy* (1977).  They actually met, as MacNiven verifies.  The times
>> are
>> > also right, so maybe there is a connection.  I agree?Durrell gets too
>> > explicit with Constance and sex.  I?d call his treatment highbrow
>> > pornography.
>> >
>> > Bruce
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > .
>> >
>> > On Oct 3, 2016, at 11:44 AM, Kennedy Gammage <gammage.kennedy at gmail.com
>> >
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > Putting this supposition out there for discussion: that Jolan Chang was
>> > the inspiration for Sebastian / Affad in the Quintet ? infamously for
>> all
>> > the annoying tantric sex with-and-in Constance, which I consider
>> somewhat
>> > of a drawback for the central book in the Quintet and a Booker Prize
>> > shortlist.
>> >
>> > Please feel free to disagree - Ken
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > ILDS mailing list
>> > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>> >
>> >
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161005/
>> 44049654/attachment-0001.html>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 6
>> Date: Thu, 6 Oct 2016 02:15:21 +0200
>> From: MarcPiel <marc at marcpiel.fr>
>> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>> Subject: [ilds] Fwd: CENTRE POMPIDOU - ART ET LIBERT? : RUPTURE,
>>         GUERRE ET SURR?ALISME EN ?GYPTE (1938 -1948) - 19 OCTOBRE 2016 -
>> 16
>>         JANVIER 2017
>> Message-ID: <9ADCEBE6-3C41-4782-A840-DAC50B24A0C6 at marcpiel.fr>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>>
>> I thought this could interest some if the list!
>> The attachment at the end is a press release.
>> B R
>> Marc
>>
>> Envoy? de mon iPad
>>
>> D?but du message transf?r? :
>>
>> Exp?diteur: PEREIRA Anne-Marie <Anne-Marie.Pereira at centrepompidou.fr>
>> Date: 4 octobre 2016 18:55:23 UTC+2
>> Objet: CENTRE POMPIDOU - ART ET LIBERT? : RUPTURE, GUERRE ET SURR?ALISME
>> EN ?GYPTE (1938 -1948) - 19 OCTOBRE 2016 - 16 JANVIER 2017
>>
>>
>> Art et Libert? : Rupture, Guerre et Surr?alisme en ?gypte (1938 ? 1948)
>> est la premi?re exposition consacr?e au groupe Art et Libert? ( jama?at
>> al-fann wa al-hurriyyah),
>> qui a rassembl? autour de Georges Henein une constellation d?artistes et
>> ?crivains r?sidant au Caire dans les ann?es 1930 et 1940.
>>
>> Fond? le 22 d?cembre 1938 ? l?occasion de la publication du manifeste
>> Vive l?art d?g?n?r?, le groupe Art et Libert? a fourni ? une jeune
>> g?n?ration d?artistes, d?intellectuels et d?activistes
>> une plate-forme h?t?rog?ne propice ? de nombreuses r?formes culturelles
>> et politiques. Les membres du groupe ont jou? un r?le actif au sein d?un
>> r?seau international dynamique
>> d?intellectuels et d?artistes li?s ? la mouvance surr?aliste. ? l?aube de
>> la Seconde Guerre mondiale et dans une ?gypte sous domination coloniale
>> britannique, le groupe Art et Libert?
>> s?est inscrit dans un projet culturel et politique international en
>> d?fiant le fascisme, le nationalisme et le colonialisme. Questionnant le
>> surr?alisme, il a tent? de construire
>> un langage litt?raire et pictural contemporain engag? au niveau mondial
>> autant qu?enracin? dans les pr?occupations artistiques et politiques
>> locales.
>> Sur invitation de Catherine David, directrice adjointe du mus?e national
>> d?art moderne en charge de la recherche et de la mondialisation, les
>> commissaires ind?pendants Sam Bardaouil et Till Fellrath /
>> Art Reoriented, ont rassembl? les r?sultats de cinq ann?es de recherches
>> approfondies et de centaines d?entretiens men?s sur le terrain en ?gypte et
>> dans de nombreux autres pays.
>>
>> Vous trouverez ci-joint le dossier de presse de l?exposition.
>> Le vernissage presse aura lieu, sur invitation, le mercredi 19 octobre
>> 2016 de 17h ? 19h 30, Galerie du mus?e et galerie d?art graphique, Mus?e,
>> niveau 4.
>> Je vous remercie de bien vouloir noter cette date, vous recevrez
>> l?invitation ?lectronique dans les prochains jours.
>>
>> Bien ? vous
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161006/
>> c9bbc1fd/attachment.html>
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> A non-text attachment was scrubbed...
>> Name: image001.jpg
>> Type: image/jpeg
>> Size: 38581 bytes
>> Desc: not available
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161006/
>> c9bbc1fd/attachment.jpg>
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161006/
>> c9bbc1fd/attachment-0001.html>
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> A non-text attachment was scrubbed...
>> Name: DP Art et Liberte-1.pdf
>> Type: application/pdf
>> Size: 1404506 bytes
>> Desc: not available
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161006/
>> c9bbc1fd/attachment.pdf>
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>> URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161006/
>> c9bbc1fd/attachment-0002.html>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: Digest Footer
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> ILDS mailing list
>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> End of ILDS Digest, Vol 114, Issue 6
>> ************************************
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> ILDS mailing list
> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20161006/9a2175c4/attachment.html>


More information about the ILDS mailing list