[ilds] Revoltingness

Richard Pine pinedurrellcorfu at gmail.com
Sat May 21 01:03:45 PDT 2016


Benedicta = 'blessed' just as Felix = 'happy'.
A self-important academic with time to spare might argue that LD owed it to
Rudolf Steiner's 'Portal of Initiation' but s/he would be wasting his/her
time.
RP

On Sat, May 21, 2016 at 4:24 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
wrote:

> David, this is the basic question which I continually ask myself.  Why is
> *Tunc* as it is.  It is a real revolt in at least two ways.  Why didn’t
> Durrell continued down the path of the *Quartet* and the island books?
> Dunno.
>
> Bruce
>
>
> On May 20, 2016, at 3:19 PM, Denise Tart & David Green <
> dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>
> My dear Bruce,
>
> When I look around at some of our new buildings, suburbs, politicians,
> Isis, corporate narcissist, you don't have to look far to see the
> attraction of revoltingness. I wrote a poem many years ago called The
> Adoration of the F&$kwit. Wish I could find it now. Let's face it the
> landscape or moodscape of Tunc is hardly the Elysian Fields or dinner at
> count D's.
>
> David
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On 21 May 2016, at 7:09 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
> wrote:
>
> Sam Kirshaw certainly has a (deliberately?) provocative take on Benedicta
> (whose name I initially took to mean “well spoken” or some such).  I would
> not go so far as to say she’s more real than Io or Justine or Melissa.  In
> fact, I don’t much care for her character.  Durrell, however, seems to have
> other ideas.  So, “this slender woman riding down upon us like some drunken
> queen of the Iceni” (p. 158; 3.2).  The Iceni were a Celtic tribe during
> the Roman Period.  Tacitus mentions them.  Their queen Boudica led a revolt
> against the Romans.  “Benedicta” plays on “Boudica?”  Possibly.  Hence,
> “The Revolt of Aphrodite?”  Dunno.  I just tend to see her as simply
> revolting, doubled-toed and all.  Still, I understand the attraction of
> “revoltingness.”
>
> Bruce
>
>
>
>
>
> On May 20, 2016, at 1:29 PM, Sam Kirshaw <samkirshaw at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Thank you James
>
> Yes, I think most academics have missed a trick here. Benedicta is not
> considered and is not merely victim. She survives! And more than survives
> alongside the thinking weed. Could it be because most of the academics
> following the Lineaments trail are male? Perish the thought!
>
> Welcome to the discussion, Sam!
>
> On 2016-05-19 1:56 PM, Sam Kirshaw wrote:
>
> Is this a trust or an enslavement?
>
>
> Either everything or nothing...  Charlock and Benedicta seem to have
> sorted that out for themselves at the end, which seems to give a bit of
> hope.  With the records / memory / determinism destroyed, who knows --
> alas, he doesn't tell us.
>
> I am not sure they have sorted it out but they will destroy the capitalist
> contractual bond and then see. Yes, there is hope
>
> It is only disengagement that allows the anti-hero
> to triumph and Durrell?s work is littered with them
> both failing in general terms and succeeding but
> occasionally.
>
>
> The hero would a rules-man indeed.  This is a fascinating take.  But
> "disengagement" seems to call for a Buddhist or Taoist
> conceptualization, perhaps?  As you say, "The hero would have to play by
> the rules" and pace Che those rules are laid down by Firm or at least by
> the system in which it has a deep interest.  Is Charlock's closing "very
> much master of myself" (Nunquam 7.1.2, p. 283) then a radical break with
> systems of rule or at least artificial rulers?  Hmm…
>
> Ah, yes, the Taoist take seems to be appropriate here. I’m leaning that
> way.
>
> Take Benedicta as an example in her time. Her
> devil?s teat and the attempted excision of same are
> a telling element of this tendency.
>
>
> You know, I can't think of a decent academic study of Benedicta...  She
> gets short shrift in much of this, but really, she's alive and active at
> the end -- she's the one who recovers, unlike Iolanthe.  She might even
> be mistress of herself too.
>
> Undoubtedly at the end Benedicta is mistress of herself and indeed as the
> sole survivor of the Merlin family the one who can choose to lose it all!
> Such bravado!!! But more than that. I think there is a consciousness even
> in her madness phases that belies traditional opinion of her. This is a
> woman who has led her “brother” to the sacrifice of his manhood, who has
> killed her husband, apparently on command, and has sold her body and almost
> her soul for the greater good of the firm. She is so much more a real woman
> than Io, Melissa or even Justine!
>
>
>
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