[ilds] ILDS Digest, Vol 107, Issue 13

James Gifford james.d.gifford at gmail.com
Tue Mar 29 09:34:35 PDT 2016


Hi Paul,

I'm sending to the list in case anyone else is interested (and for 
general record).  The University of Victoria holds a relatively recent 
Perlès collection that I believe came from a family member -- they may 
have some updated information on the estate:

http://www.uvic.ca/library/locations/home/spcoll/index.php

There's no information at all in the WATCH file on Perlès.  I'll pass 
along the message to people whom I know were connected to the Assoc. LD 
en Languedoc, but I suspect it's no longer active.

All best,
James

On 2016-03-29 9:26 AM, Sky Blue Press wrote:
> Hello Durrellians,
>
> I'm trying to find out who owns rights to Alfred Perlès' works--I'm
> publishing a book on Henry Miller in which I'd like to include Fred's last
> letter to Henry, just days before the latter's death. I was told to check
> with Association Lawrence Durrell en Languedoc in Sommieres, but their
> e-mail is defunct. I'm hoping someone on the list can pass along my request,
> which is below.
>
> Chers Messieurs:
> Je suis éditeur de Sky Blue Press aux Etats-Unis et je voudrais publier une
> lettre par Alfred Perlès dans un livre sur Henry Miller. Pourriez-vous me
> dire qui est le propriétaire des droits pour cette lettre ? Je voudrais
> obtenir permission, mais je ne sais pas de qui.
> Merci tellement,
> Paul Herron, Sky Blue Press
>
> Any help is much appreciated!
> Paul
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: ILDS [mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca] On Behalf Of
> ilds-request at lists.uvic.ca
> Sent: Monday, March 28, 2016 2:01 PM
> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: ILDS Digest, Vol 107, Issue 13
>
> Send ILDS mailing list submissions to
> 	ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>
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> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
> "Re: Contents of ILDS digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>     1. Re: Reading Literature (Kennedy Gammage)
>     2. Re: Reading Literature (William Apt)
>     3. Re: Reading Literature (Denise Tart & David Green)
>     4. Re: Reading Literature (William Apt)
>     5. Re: Mr. Esposito (Panaiotis Gerontopoulos)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2016 16:17:06 -0700
> From: Kennedy Gammage <gammage.kennedy at gmail.com>
> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: Re: [ilds] Reading Literature
> Message-ID:
> 	<CANDhJnQt_DjKPZ56=8WwdgXD_HsQBbkroKU5+c7Vhq9GbOKUAA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> This listserv close reading of Justine from 2007 sounds amazing! I would
> love to read it. I know that, whenever you ask for something like this, you
> are specifically asking the busiest person we know to make it happen...so we
> can wait, but if there was a link to it someday I know I would do the deep
> dive. Of course everyone who knew him misses Bill Godshalk. A world-class
> scholar with an epic sense of humor! Maybe we should try to tackle Balthazar
> sometime in the near future. Billy Apt, what do you say to that?
>
> - Ken
>
> On Sun, Mar 27, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> I agree with David Green about how we go about reading literature.
>> Academia has come in for a lot of criticism lately, but with respect
>> to Lawrence Durrell, I?d like to point out what happened on this
>> Listserv many years ago.  From about 2007 to 2008 (my dates are
>> probably wrong), the List held a reading of *Justine* open to
>> all-comers.  It was a close reading of the text, section by section.
>> The response was overwhelming; on an average day, I?d get about 40-50
>> emails on a given topic.  Those readings (most exchanges civil, some
>> not) changed my views of Durrell?s most famous novel.  The discussions
>> were moderated by William Godshalk, Charles Sligh, and James
>> Gifford?all academics.  They did not impose their views, rather they
>> offered their opinions and interpretations.  They all did a marvelous
>> job, and I imagine they handled themselves on the List as they would
>> in their classrooms.  So, let?s put a little perspective on what academia
> can do at its best in the study of literature.
>>
>> Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Mar 26, 2016, at 1:55 PM, Denise Tart & David Green <
>> dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>>
>> Whack, pow, thud, academics cop another hit: teaching English lit badly.
>> Well yes, I had that experience too but mainly because the texts
>> seemed to be a pretext for teaching the socialist advance. But the
>> scholarly world was a wonderful place full of books and bars and
>> broads, not too mention alliteration and it here amongst all these
>> appalling scholars that I discovered Wilde, Keats, Whitman etc and
>> Lawrence George Durrell. The quartet I knew about, my mum had the set,
>> but there were all these other books too. Durrell is unique for sure,
>> a great writer and personality which the ilds, composed of many academics
> as I gather, has done much to promote.
>> And yes, we may teach literature through a direct relationship between
>> reader and text (a very Puritan approach) but this does not invalidate
>> literary criticism, much of which is in fact very good, or context.
>> Writers rarely exist in a vacuum. Much as Larry liked islands he too
>> was part of a wider world which I sometimes think he did not like very
>> much. His books often strike me as a revolt against the present, the
>> future. I intend to mine Tunc and Nunquam in this vein.
>>
>> David Whitewine
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> ILDS mailing list
>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2016 19:27:21 -0500
> From: William Apt <billyapt at gmail.com>
> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: Re: [ilds] Reading Literature
> Message-ID: <D465FFB1-E50B-4DE2-900F-C2A9B11881DC at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Ken:
>
> Bill, Charles and Jamie's generous clarifications of the more obscure parts
> of Justine were wonderfully helpful. That was the reason I joined ILDS. Am
> re-reading Prospero now in anticipation of the Corfu leg of my trip this
> June, prior to Crete, and, after Prospero, am going to make the effort to
> try and tackle Swan's Way - and after that a whole slew of other stuff
> (including the final installment of Fermor's "Great Trudge") - so while I
> would like to re-read Balthazar, which I loved, my plate is full right now.
> However, I will follow with enthusiasm the commentary of others should the
> group decide to undertake the task.
>
> I look forward to seeing everyone in June and to many wine fueled
> discussions by the wine dark sea!
>
> Billy
>
> PS:  I was fortunate to meet Bill at the London conference and liked him
> immediately and immensely. Was so sorry he passed so soon thereafter and
> that it was to be our only encounter.
>
> WILLIAM APT
> Attorney at Law
> 812 San Antonio St, Ste 401
> Austin TX 78701
> 512/708-8300
> 512/708-8011 FAX
>
>> On Mar 27, 2016, at 6:17 PM, Kennedy Gammage <gammage.kennedy at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>
>> This listserv close reading of Justine from 2007 sounds amazing! I would
> love to read it. I know that, whenever you ask for something like this, you
> are specifically asking the busiest person we know to make it happen...so we
> can wait, but if there was a link to it someday I know I would do the deep
> dive. Of course everyone who knew him misses Bill Godshalk. A world-class
> scholar with an epic sense of humor! Maybe we should try to tackle Balthazar
> sometime in the near future. Billy Apt, what do you say to that?
>>
>> - Ken
>>
>>> On Sun, Mar 27, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>> I agree with David Green about how we go about reading literature.
> Academia has come in for a lot of criticism lately, but with respect to
> Lawrence Durrell, I?d like to point out what happened on this Listserv many
> years ago.  From about 2007 to 2008 (my dates are probably wrong), the List
> held a reading of Justine open to all-comers.  It was a close reading of the
> text, section by section.  The response was overwhelming; on an average day,
> I?d get about 40-50 emails on a given topic.  Those readings (most exchanges
> civil, some not) changed my views of Durrell?s most famous novel.  The
> discussions were moderated by William Godshalk, Charles Sligh, and James
> Gifford?all academics.  They did not impose their views, rather they offered
> their opinions and interpretations.  They all did a marvelous job, and I
> imagine they handled themselves on the List as they would in their
> classrooms.  So, let?s put a little perspective on what academia can do at
> its best in the study of li!
>   terature.
>>>
>>> Bruce
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Mar 26, 2016, at 1:55 PM, Denise Tart & David Green
> <dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Whack, pow, thud, academics cop another hit: teaching English lit badly.
> Well yes, I had that experience too but mainly because the texts seemed to
> be a pretext for teaching the socialist advance. But the scholarly world was
> a wonderful place full of books and bars and broads, not too mention
> alliteration and it here amongst all these appalling scholars that I
> discovered Wilde, Keats, Whitman etc and Lawrence George Durrell. The
> quartet I knew about, my mum had the set, but there were all these other
> books too. Durrell is unique for sure, a great writer and personality which
> the ilds, composed of many academics as I gather, has done much to promote.
>>>> And yes, we may teach literature through a direct relationship between
> reader and text (a very Puritan approach) but this does not invalidate
> literary criticism, much of which is in fact very good, or context. Writers
> rarely exist in a vacuum. Much as Larry liked islands he too was part of a
> wider world which I sometimes think he did not like very much. His books
> often strike me as a revolt against the present, the future. I intend to
> mine Tunc and Nunquam in this vein.
>>>>
>>>> David Whitewine
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> ILDS mailing list
>>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> ILDS mailing list
>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2016 11:49:31 +1100
> From: Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au>
> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: Re: [ilds] Reading Literature
> Message-ID: <78D4A44A-0823-4A57-A6B4-BC2F0F94395F at bigpond.net.au>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Sounds like a great trip William. The wine fuelled discussions appeal. Sadly
> I am unable to travel OS this year. Haven't seen Corfu since 1985. Bet it's
> changed a lot? Hopefully not too much. Have a bottle or two for me. I'm
> working on Tunc and Nunquam. Will post thoughts as I go.
>
> David
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On 28 Mar 2016, at 11:27 AM, William Apt <billyapt at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Ken:
>>
>> Bill, Charles and Jamie's generous clarifications of the more obscure
> parts of Justine were wonderfully helpful. That was the reason I joined
> ILDS. Am re-reading Prospero now in anticipation of the Corfu leg of my trip
> this June, prior to Crete, and, after Prospero, am going to make the effort
> to try and tackle Swan's Way - and after that a whole slew of other stuff
> (including the final installment of Fermor's "Great Trudge") - so while I
> would like to re-read Balthazar, which I loved, my plate is full right now.
> However, I will follow with enthusiasm the commentary of others should the
> group decide to undertake the task.
>>
>> I look forward to seeing everyone in June and to many wine fueled
> discussions by the wine dark sea!
>>
>> Billy
>>
>> PS:  I was fortunate to meet Bill at the London conference and liked him
> immediately and immensely. Was so sorry he passed so soon thereafter and
> that it was to be our only encounter.
>>
>> WILLIAM APT
>> Attorney at Law
>> 812 San Antonio St, Ste 401
>> Austin TX 78701
>> 512/708-8300
>> 512/708-8011 FAX
>>
>>> On Mar 27, 2016, at 6:17 PM, Kennedy Gammage <gammage.kennedy at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>>
>>> This listserv close reading of Justine from 2007 sounds amazing! I would
> love to read it. I know that, whenever you ask for something like this, you
> are specifically asking the busiest person we know to make it happen...so we
> can wait, but if there was a link to it someday I know I would do the deep
> dive. Of course everyone who knew him misses Bill Godshalk. A world-class
> scholar with an epic sense of humor! Maybe we should try to tackle Balthazar
> sometime in the near future. Billy Apt, what do you say to that?
>>>
>>> - Ken
>>>
>>>> On Sun, Mar 27, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>>> I agree with David Green about how we go about reading literature.
> Academia has come in for a lot of criticism lately, but with respect to
> Lawrence Durrell, I?d like to point out what happened on this Listserv many
> years ago.  From about 2007 to 2008 (my dates are probably wrong), the List
> held a reading of Justine open to all-comers.  It was a close reading of the
> text, section by section.  The response was overwhelming; on an average day,
> I?d get about 40-50 emails on a given topic.  Those readings (most exchanges
> civil, some not) changed my views of Durrell?s most famous novel.  The
> discussions were moderated by William Godshalk, Charles Sligh, and James
> Gifford?all academics.  They did not impose their views, rather they offered
> their opinions and interpretations.  They all did a marvelous job, and I
> imagine they handled themselves on the List as they would in their
> classrooms.  So, let?s put a little perspective on what academia can do at
> its best in the study of l!
>   iterature.
>>>>
>>>> Bruce
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> On Mar 26, 2016, at 1:55 PM, Denise Tart & David Green
> <dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Whack, pow, thud, academics cop another hit: teaching English lit
> badly. Well yes, I had that experience too but mainly because the texts
> seemed to be a pretext for teaching the socialist advance. But the scholarly
> world was a wonderful place full of books and bars and broads, not too
> mention alliteration and it here amongst all these appalling scholars that I
> discovered Wilde, Keats, Whitman etc and Lawrence George Durrell. The
> quartet I knew about, my mum had the set, but there were all these other
> books too. Durrell is unique for sure, a great writer and personality which
> the ilds, composed of many academics as I gather, has done much to promote.
>>>>> And yes, we may teach literature through a direct relationship between
> reader and text (a very Puritan approach) but this does not invalidate
> literary criticism, much of which is in fact very good, or context. Writers
> rarely exist in a vacuum. Much as Larry liked islands he too was part of a
> wider world which I sometimes think he did not like very much. His books
> often strike me as a revolt against the present, the future. I intend to
> mine Tunc and Nunquam in this vein.
>>>>>
>>>>> David Whitewine
>>>>>
>>>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> ILDS mailing list
>>>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>>>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> ILDS mailing list
>>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>> _______________________________________________
>> ILDS mailing list
>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
> -------------- next part --------------
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> <http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20160328/6793ade8/attachmen
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2016 21:30:51 -0500
> From: William Apt <billyapt at gmail.com>
> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: Re: [ilds] Reading Literature
> Message-ID: <93E0D8F9-7C15-470A-B2B7-080B836114FB at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Sounds good, David: will do! I always enjoy yr posts....
>
> WILLIAM APT
> Attorney at Law
> 812 San Antonio St, Ste 401
> Austin TX 78701
> 512/708-8300
> 512/708-8011 FAX
>
>> On Mar 27, 2016, at 7:49 PM, Denise Tart & David Green
> <dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>>
>> Sounds like a great trip William. The wine fuelled discussions appeal.
> Sadly I am unable to travel OS this year. Haven't seen Corfu since 1985. Bet
> it's changed a lot? Hopefully not too much. Have a bottle or two for me. I'm
> working on Tunc and Nunquam. Will post thoughts as I go.
>>
>> David
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>> On 28 Mar 2016, at 11:27 AM, William Apt <billyapt at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Ken:
>>>
>>> Bill, Charles and Jamie's generous clarifications of the more obscure
> parts of Justine were wonderfully helpful. That was the reason I joined
> ILDS. Am re-reading Prospero now in anticipation of the Corfu leg of my trip
> this June, prior to Crete, and, after Prospero, am going to make the effort
> to try and tackle Swan's Way - and after that a whole slew of other stuff
> (including the final installment of Fermor's "Great Trudge") - so while I
> would like to re-read Balthazar, which I loved, my plate is full right now.
> However, I will follow with enthusiasm the commentary of others should the
> group decide to undertake the task.
>>>
>>> I look forward to seeing everyone in June and to many wine fueled
> discussions by the wine dark sea!
>>>
>>> Billy
>>>
>>> PS:  I was fortunate to meet Bill at the London conference and liked him
> immediately and immensely. Was so sorry he passed so soon thereafter and
> that it was to be our only encounter.
>>>
>>> WILLIAM APT
>>> Attorney at Law
>>> 812 San Antonio St, Ste 401
>>> Austin TX 78701
>>> 512/708-8300
>>> 512/708-8011 FAX
>>>
>>>> On Mar 27, 2016, at 6:17 PM, Kennedy Gammage <gammage.kennedy at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> This listserv close reading of Justine from 2007 sounds amazing! I would
> love to read it. I know that, whenever you ask for something like this, you
> are specifically asking the busiest person we know to make it happen...so we
> can wait, but if there was a link to it someday I know I would do the deep
> dive. Of course everyone who knew him misses Bill Godshalk. A world-class
> scholar with an epic sense of humor! Maybe we should try to tackle Balthazar
> sometime in the near future. Billy Apt, what do you say to that?
>>>>
>>>> - Ken
>>>>
>>>>> On Sun, Mar 27, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Bruce Redwine
> <bredwine1968 at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>> I agree with David Green about how we go about reading literature.
> Academia has come in for a lot of criticism lately, but with respect to
> Lawrence Durrell, I?d like to point out what happened on this Listserv many
> years ago.  From about 2007 to 2008 (my dates are probably wrong), the List
> held a reading of Justine open to all-comers.  It was a close reading of the
> text, section by section.  The response was overwhelming; on an average day,
> I?d get about 40-50 emails on a given topic.  Those readings (most exchanges
> civil, some not) changed my views of Durrell?s most famous novel.  The
> discussions were moderated by William Godshalk, Charles Sligh, and James
> Gifford?all academics.  They did not impose their views, rather they offered
> their opinions and interpretations.  They all did a marvelous job, and I
> imagine they handled themselves on the List as they would in their
> classrooms.  So, let?s put a little perspective on what academia can do at
> its best in the study of !
>   literature.
>>>>>
>>>>> Bruce
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Mar 26, 2016, at 1:55 PM, Denise Tart & David Green
> <dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Whack, pow, thud, academics cop another hit: teaching English lit
> badly. Well yes, I had that experience too but mainly because the texts
> seemed to be a pretext for teaching the socialist advance. But the scholarly
> world was a wonderful place full of books and bars and broads, not too
> mention alliteration and it here amongst all these appalling scholars that I
> discovered Wilde, Keats, Whitman etc and Lawrence George Durrell. The
> quartet I knew about, my mum had the set, but there were all these other
> books too. Durrell is unique for sure, a great writer and personality which
> the ilds, composed of many academics as I gather, has done much to promote.
>>>>>> And yes, we may teach literature through a direct relationship between
> reader and text (a very Puritan approach) but this does not invalidate
> literary criticism, much of which is in fact very good, or context. Writers
> rarely exist in a vacuum. Much as Larry liked islands he too was part of a
> wider world which I sometimes think he did not like very much. His books
> often strike me as a revolt against the present, the future. I intend to
> mine Tunc and Nunquam in this vein.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> David Whitewine
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> ILDS mailing list
>>>>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>>>>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> ILDS mailing list
>>>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>>>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> ILDS mailing list
>>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>> _______________________________________________
>> ILDS mailing list
>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca
>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
> -------------- next part --------------
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2016 21:45:13 +0300
> From: Panaiotis Gerontopoulos <pan.gero at hotmail.com>
> To: "ilds at lists.uvic.ca" <ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
> Subject: Re: [ilds] Mr. Esposito
> Message-ID: <DUB120-W1880E95A16A36A1EE70CF981860 at phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>
> Whack, pow, thud. bang! Uurrah for teachers and critics, beware of and shame
> to irriverent grocers and pub-tenants dealing with high literature seated on
> their toilets where they belong. We heard all this, in this List in the few
> past days. The fact is that nobody put in question the need to have teachers
> and critics, provided they base their teachings and critiques on the
> contents of a text and on what we know about the circumstances under which
> the author wrote it. In other words in plain words, understandable by the
> "common reader"and the next door grocer. They are not so stupid after all.
> What is to avoid is to speak about simple texts using high flown words and
> post-modern lingos neglecting solidly established facts.
> Good examples of the accomplisments of this school of thaught are the
> various readings of Bitter Lemons as a marvellous travel book, taking  in
> serious the first words written in 1957 by Lawrence Durrell in his preface:
>             This is not a political book, but simply a somewhat
> impressionistic study of the moods and atmpspheres of Cyprus during the
> troubled years years 1953-1956.
> In 1957, the atmosphere in Cyprus continued to be troubled and in December,
> Bitter Lemons won for its author the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize. The Queen
> Mother told him during the ad hoc ceremony held at Kensington Palace that
> she had enjoyed the book and Lord Salisbury, top exponent of the
> ultra-conservative Tories asking for tougher measures against the revolted
> Cyps, disected the book with a tender little speech (Mac Niven, A Biography,
> 464).
> Actually, Bitter Lemons was an awkward attempt to white-wash the blind
> British policies in dealing with the decades-old demand of Greeks (including
> Cavafy) and Creek-Cypriots for self determination. Durrell was not a
> policy-maker and he is not to blame if he lied for his country but make of
> him a Philhellene is quite another story. Nonetheless, at the insistance of
> Dr. Spyros Georgas, "physician of elderly British aristocrats and retired
> civil servants who moved in the island from India in the 50s and 60s" and
> Richard Price [Pine?] director of the Durrell School of Corfu, the Bosketto
> Park of Corfu was renamed in 2006 Durrell Park (Helena Smith, the Guardian,
> September 22, 2006). In addition, in 2008, the Municipality of Corfu erected
> in the Park two brass-busts to honor furtherly the two authors and
> philhellene brothers.
> I believe that if Bitter Lemons were read with the pragmatism of a grocer,
> taking into account Durrell's letter to the Governor of Cyprus on February
> 17 1954, published by Barbara Papastavrou-Koroniotaki this embarassing
> situation could have been avoided and if only they could both brothers would
> agree.
> Panayotis Gerontopoulos
> From: dtart at bigpond.net.au
> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2016 07:55:35 +1100
> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
> Subject: Re: [ilds] Mr. Esposito
>
> Whack, pow, thud, academics cop another hit: teaching English lit badly.
> Well yes, I had that experience too but mainly because the texts seemed to
> be a pretext for teaching the socialist advance. But the scholarly world was
> a wonderful place full of books and bars and broads, not too mention
> alliteration and it here amongst all these appalling scholars that I
> discovered Wilde, Keats, Whitman etc and Lawrence George Durrell. The
> quartet I knew about, my mum had the set, but there were all these other
> books too. Durrell is unique for sure, a great writer and personality which
> the ilds, composed of many academics as I gather, has done much to promote.
> And yes, we may teach literature through a direct relationship between
> reader and text (a very Puritan approach) but this does not invalidate
> literary criticism, much of which is in fact very good, or context. Writers
> rarely exist in a vacuum. Much as Larry liked islands he too was part of a
> wider world which I sometimes think he!
>    did not like very much. His books often strike me as a revolt against the
> present, the future. I intend to mine Tunc and Nunquam in this vein.
> David Whitewine
>
> Sent from my iPad
> On 27 Mar 2016, at 5:16 AM, Frederick Schoff <frederick.schoff at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>
> This matches my own experience. I found my literature classes in college
> stultifying. I would show up with enthusiasm after reading, say, Faulkner or
> Woolf, and left wondering 'What book(s) did these people read?'. They were
> too busy talking about various references (presumably to show their
> erudition) to discuss the actual book. I was only bored, and bid adieu to
> lit classes. One reason I like Durrell so much is that he seems unique.
>
> On Mar 26, 2016, at 2:17 AM, james Esposito <giacomoesposito72 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> What teacher employs a 'method'? My view of teaching literature does not
> amount to a 'method'! It is a way of looking at texts without recourse to
> the opinions and aesthetic perceptions of any except the teacher and his/her
> students.
> I do not argue with the view that a text can be explicated, teased out,
> probed, but it is like a mine - you delve in to extract whatever ore you can
> discover, not what a mineralogist tells you to discover. A good teacher
> shows you the way - hands you a drill, even a stick of dynamite! but
> essentially the relationship is you and the text.
> When - many years ago! - I was a student our teacher presented us with
> Eliot's The Waste Land and pointed us towards Jessie Weston's "From Ritual
> to Romance" - why? because Eliot makes specific reference to her work, and
> suddenly a whole world of the Grail Quest, the meaning of the Waste Land and
> the Fisher King, was opened up to us. But Weston was an integral part of the
> poem, not an external aid to comprehension. We needed nothing other than
> what was on the page and what stood behind the page.
> That same teacher offered us what he referred to as 'a medieval maxim','Man
> by the exercise of his free will fulfils the pattern of his destiny'. I have
> spent sixty years trying to find the source of that, and failing, but I
> never cease to bless the man who provided it. (Does anyone know its source?)
> Of course we need to discuss what is 'meant' by the text. Keats's (and I
> refer to the author of 'Ode to a Nightingale', not Durrell's character!)
> 'beauty is truth, truth beauty...' could occupy a reader delightfully for a
> lifetime and never yield its meaning, but no amount of help from Messieurs
> Derrida or Ricoeur can make an iota of difference to our own judgement. I
> think many critics suffer from a lack of an ability to make judgements of
> their own, and fall back vicariously on sources like les messieurs (for whom
> I do have considerable respect) rather than make the big jump towards
> shaping their own innate aesthetic.
> James Esposito
>
>
> On Fri, Mar 25, 2016 at 6:19 PM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
> wrote:
> I don't think your method will result in much enlightenment.
> Bruce
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> On Mar 25, 2016, at 9:08 AM, james Esposito <giacomoesposito72 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> I am very sorry indeed to learn that you disagree with the following
> statement:
> "Education surely exists to enlighten young minds (and older!) and to give
> them a better understanding of themselves and the world."
> James Esposito
>
> On Fri, Mar 25, 2016 at 5:55 PM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
> wrote:
> This whole approach seems to me a grossly oversimplified approach to the
> appreciation and teaching of literature, which after all is not some
> exercise in logical positivism.  Words are tricky and not reducible to pat
> meanings, and how writers use words is even far more complex.  So I disagree
> with all your statements.
> Bruce
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> On Mar 25, 2016, at 1:58 AM, james Esposito <giacomoesposito72 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> By 'teaching their students how to enjoy texts' I meant that I see the
> principal purpose of teaching as the widening of students' appreciation of
> their chosen subject, be it literature, science or any other discipline.
> Education surely exists to enlighten young minds (and older!) and to give
> them a better understanding of themselves and the world. That may seem very
> old-fashioned but I think such purposes are diminished by what Keats called
> (paraphrase) unnecessary reaching out for reason - that is, the searching
> for explanations of what, ultimately, cannot be explained - credo quia
> absurdum. We owe it to ourselves and others (we, being teachers, writers and
> readers) to focus primarily on what the texts say, not what they don't say,
> or what a critic may think they say.
> James Esposito
>
>
> On Fri, Mar 25, 2016 at 1:25 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
> wrote:
> I wonder what it means ?to enjoy texts??  Isn?t that what we?re doing?  I
> think James Gifford is on target.  And I, a non-academic, thank him for his
> insights, which increase my enjoyment.  Keep it up, James!
>
>
>
> Bruce
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Mar 24, 2016, at 3:32 PM, james Esposito <giacomoesposito72 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>
>
>> I perhaps did not make myself clear on the subject of Durrell's
> relationship to the modernists. Of course he was well aware of the Eliots,
> Huxleys, etc, but what I meant was that we should not necessarily assume
> 'the anxiety of influence' - the fact that there are echoes of Eliot etc in
> Durrell's work does not allow us to infer that he deliberately set out to
> imitate them or to make obvious references to them - merely that, as a
> (still) apprentice writer in the first 2 novels he was setting out his own
> stall, not theirs.
>
>> And as for Keats, if I remember correctly, he got killed.
>
>> As for the mud bricks, I think it's completely far-fetched to read
> political persuasions into the fact that Durrell referred to a basic
> building material. They were just mud-bricks, not political slogans.
>
>> I think there is far too much time and effort spent on trying to analyse
> what Durrell may or may not have ingested into his writer's subconscious. It
> may be an amusing pastime for academics, but they should be teaching their
> students how to enjoy texts and not how to tear them apart. It isn't
> 'hunting of the snark' territory.
>
>> James Esposito
>
>>
>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
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