[ilds] Reading Literature

William Apt billyapt at gmail.com
Sun Mar 27 19:30:51 PDT 2016


Sounds good, David: will do! I always enjoy yr posts....

WILLIAM APT
Attorney at Law
812 San Antonio St, Ste 401
Austin TX 78701
512/708-8300
512/708-8011 FAX

> On Mar 27, 2016, at 7:49 PM, Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
> 
> Sounds like a great trip William. The wine fuelled discussions appeal. Sadly I am unable to travel OS this year. Haven't seen Corfu since 1985. Bet it's changed a lot? Hopefully not too much. Have a bottle or two for me. I'm working on Tunc and Nunquam. Will post thoughts as I go.
> 
> David
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On 28 Mar 2016, at 11:27 AM, William Apt <billyapt at gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>> Ken:
>> 
>> Bill, Charles and Jamie's generous clarifications of the more obscure parts of Justine were wonderfully helpful. That was the reason I joined ILDS. Am re-reading Prospero now in anticipation of the Corfu leg of my trip this June, prior to Crete, and, after Prospero, am going to make the effort to try and tackle Swan's Way - and after that a whole slew of other stuff (including the final installment of Fermor's "Great Trudge") - so while I would like to re-read Balthazar, which I loved, my plate is full right now. However, I will follow with enthusiasm the commentary of others should the group decide to undertake the task. 
>> 
>> I look forward to seeing everyone in June and to many wine fueled discussions by the wine dark sea! 
>> 
>> Billy
>> 
>> PS:  I was fortunate to meet Bill at the London conference and liked him immediately and immensely. Was so sorry he passed so soon thereafter and that it was to be our only encounter. 
>> 
>> WILLIAM APT
>> Attorney at Law
>> 812 San Antonio St, Ste 401
>> Austin TX 78701
>> 512/708-8300
>> 512/708-8011 FAX
>> 
>>> On Mar 27, 2016, at 6:17 PM, Kennedy Gammage <gammage.kennedy at gmail.com> wrote:
>>> 
>>> This listserv close reading of Justine from 2007 sounds amazing! I would love to read it. I know that, whenever you ask for something like this, you are specifically asking the busiest person we know to make it happen...so we can wait, but if there was a link to it someday I know I would do the deep dive. Of course everyone who knew him misses Bill Godshalk. A world-class scholar with an epic sense of humor! Maybe we should try to tackle Balthazar sometime in the near future. Billy Apt, what do you say to that?
>>> 
>>> - Ken
>>> 
>>>> On Sun, Mar 27, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> I agree with David Green about how we go about reading literature.  Academia has come in for a lot of criticism lately, but with respect to Lawrence Durrell, I’d like to point out what happened on this Listserv many years ago.  From about 2007 to 2008 (my dates are probably wrong), the List held a reading of Justine open to all-comers.  It was a close reading of the text, section by section.  The response was overwhelming; on an average day, I’d get about 40-50 emails on a given topic.  Those readings (most exchanges civil, some not) changed my views of Durrell’s most famous novel.  The discussions were moderated by William Godshalk, Charles Sligh, and James Gifford—all academics.  They did not impose their views, rather they offered their opinions and interpretations.  They all did a marvelous job, and I imagine they handled themselves on the List as they would in their classrooms.  So, let’s put a little perspective on what academia can do at its best in the study of literature.
>>>> 
>>>> Bruce
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>>> On Mar 26, 2016, at 1:55 PM, Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> Whack, pow, thud, academics cop another hit: teaching English lit badly. Well yes, I had that experience too but mainly because the texts seemed to be a pretext for teaching the socialist advance. But the scholarly world was a wonderful place full of books and bars and broads, not too mention alliteration and it here amongst all these appalling scholars that I discovered Wilde, Keats, Whitman etc and Lawrence George Durrell. The quartet I knew about, my mum had the set, but there were all these other books too. Durrell is unique for sure, a great writer and personality which the ilds, composed of many academics as I gather, has done much to promote. 
>>>>> And yes, we may teach literature through a direct relationship between reader and text (a very Puritan approach) but this does not invalidate literary criticism, much of which is in fact very good, or context. Writers rarely exist in a vacuum. Much as Larry liked islands he too was part of a wider world which I sometimes think he did not like very much. His books often strike me as a revolt against the present, the future. I intend to mine Tunc and Nunquam in this vein.
>>>>> 
>>>>> David Whitewine
>>>>> 
>>>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>> 
>>>> 
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