[ilds] Retirement Age during the British Raj

Denise Tart & David Green dtart at bigpond.net.au
Thu Oct 22 17:46:19 PDT 2015


Caricature can be a way of exploring or coming to terms with national character. It is certainly a common artistic devise, and a comic device also.
Colonial Imperialist Gideon is a case in point, but Durrell does his caricatures with humour even affection. It must be said that Said comes across as rather lacking in these qualities and I'd say thinned skinned to boot. But I am not an Egyptian who experienced the haughty boorishness of British control before and during the war. But I have experienced it as an Australian to which I say in no uncertain terms get ......expletive deleted owing to this being a family program.

David 

Sent from my iPad

> On 23 Oct 2015, at 10:34 am, Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net> wrote:
> 
> I’m not saying you do, David, but some do indeed find Durrell’s representations of Greeks patronizing, even caricatures.  I heard a talk on that very subject in Vancouver.  On the other hand, using that same criteria, one might call Zorba the Greek, Kazantzakis’s well-known creation, a caricature of Greeks, but I don’t see that comparison being raised.  Nor with Jules Dassin’s Never on Sunday.  Like Kazantzakis, Dassin and Mercouri were also famous Greeks.  So I think Durrell should be given a break:  the kind of break Edward Said does not give Lawrence Durrell.
> 
> Brucer
> 
> 
> 
>> On Oct 22, 2015, at 3:40 PM, Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>> 
>> although born in India, Durrell doesn't, to my knowledge write about the orient much at all. And by orient I mean India and Asia, not the Middle East or Egypt. Said, I imagine, disliked Durrell's comments about Egypt and possibly his lack of academic credentials. Others find Durrell's portrayal of Greeks as patronising, comic characters or stock in trade figures. Although he is critical of the colonial administration on Cyprus, one can argue that Durrell sometimes sees the world through a privileged western lens, coloured with a colonial tinge. Certainly he was seen as an imperialists on Cyprus. 
>> 
>> David
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
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