[ilds] ILDS Digest, Vol 98, Issue 7

mail at durrelllibrarycorfu.org mail at durrelllibrarycorfu.org
Sun Jun 28 03:19:53 PDT 2015


ELIZAS: As Bruce says, his references do not add up to an explicit "theory" but it's up to the scholar/reader to come to terms with LD's views: first, the very general refs. to the "Elizas" in the letters, then his two essays on Shakespeare, and his fairly extensive references to the Elizas in "Minor Mythologies". I'm following up the latter in the work I'm engaged on now, b ut the book won't be published until end of 2017. What, we might ask, IS a "theory"? The "rawness of life " was more than just an idea about sensuality....
Richard Pine 
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Subject: ILDS Digest, Vol 98, Issue 7

Send ILDS mailing list submissions to	ilds at lists.uvic.caTo subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit	https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ildsor, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to	ilds-request at lists.uvic.caYou can reach the person managing the list at	ilds-owner at lists.uvic.caWhen replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specificthan "Re: Contents of ILDS digest..."Today's Topics: 1. Re: Durrell's library (Bruce Redwine) 2. Re: Durrell's library (James Gifford) 3. Re: Durrell's library (Marc Piel) 4. Durrell's library, Durrell's Elizas (Bruce Redwine)----------------------------------------------------------------------Message: 1Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:47:42 -0700From: Bruce Redwine To: james.d.gifford at gmail.com, ilds at lists.uvic.caCc: Bruce Redwine Subject: Re: [ilds] Durrell's libraryMessage-ID: <13170F43-DE14-4186-8085-CA14751DFCC1 at earthlink.net>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"That Durrell thought of revising The Revolt of Aphrodite is interesting. I wonder what would have come of it ? another equivalent to James?s New York Edition? I wish he?d completed that essay or book on the Elizabethans. He probably had a notebook on the subject. If so, where is it?Bruce> On Jun 22, 2015, at 1:02 AM, James Gifford  wrote:> > I ought to have added, SIU Carbondale produced a very helpful bibliography of Durrell's library when they acquired his papers, as did Paris Ouest (available online). Quite a bit of work, really. Those are not exhaustive since so many of LD's books pop up in other archives around the world (and were lost in WWII), and there's more through Alan G. Thomas in the British Library and LD's book requests through publishers. Nonetheless, those two (Carbondale & Paris) give a pretty good sense of what was on his shelves post-WWII.> > I'm reminded of the Library of Leonard & Virginia Woolf held by Washington State nearby, which is a beautiful drive from here. It would be hoped that some day a comparable compilation of Durrell's library could be centralized somewhere. It makes me think of finding copies of Tunc & Nunquam with Durrell's intended revisions marked out in the margins but at a library with no Durrell collection... Such things are too often tucked inside another author's papers, and who knows how many of them are spread out across the globe. Needless to say, LD never had the chance to revise the Revolt as he did the Quartet, so none of those revisions were ever realized, which is probably why he gifted the books away. What would he have done with the Quintet if he'd compiled it himself (the omnibus was put together in 1992, I think)?> > All best,> James> > On 2015-06-21 7:31 PM, Sumantra Nag wrote:>> Thanks James, for this valuable information about Durrell's familiarity>> with Sacheverell Sitwell's writing.>> >> Sumantra> _______________________________________________> ILDS mailing list> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds-------------- next part --------------An HTML attachment was scrubbed...URL: ------------------------------Message: 2Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 14:24:31 -0700From: James Gifford To: ILDS Listserv Subject: Re: [ilds] Durrell's libraryMessage-ID: <55887D0F.4020804 at gmail.com>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowedHi Bruce,Alas, what I've seen of the Revolt revisions included things such as "fix this" and then a series of markings... Some of it's quite unclear, but the extent of the revisions to the Quartet is a good indicator.As for the Elizabethans, I believe virtually all of that material is in Carbondale. From my editing work, I can say his allusions and references to his "Elizas" was extensive. A read through "Prospero's Isle: To Caliban" (1939, originally published in Shanghai) gives an immediate sense of how capacious his readings were, including a number of scholarly works -- /Panic Spring/ was also particularly rich in references to a range of Elizabethan dramatists.Best,JamesOn 2015-06-22 11:47 AM, Bruce Redwine wrote:> That Durrell thought of revising /The Revolt of Aphrodite /is> interesting. I wonder what would have come of it ? another equivalent> to James?s New York Edition? I wish he?d completed that essay or book> on the Elizabethans. He probably had a notebook on the subject. If so,> where is it?>> Bruce>>>>>>> On Jun 22, 2015, at 1:02 AM, James Gifford > > wrote:>>>> I ought to have added, SIU Carbondale produced a very helpful>> bibliography of Durrell's library when they acquired his papers, as>> did Paris Ouest (available online). Quite a bit of work, really.>> Those are not exhaustive since so many of LD's books pop up in other>> archives around the world (and were lost in WWII), and there's more>> through Alan G. Thomas in the British Library and LD's book requests>> through publishers. Nonetheless, those two (Carbondale & Paris) give>> a pretty good sense of what was on his shelves post-WWII.>>>> I'm reminded of the Library of Leonard & Virginia Woolf held by>> Washington State nearby, which is a beautiful drive from here. It>> would be hoped that some day a comparable compilation of Durrell's>> library could be centralized somewhere. It makes me think of finding>> copies of Tunc & Nunquam with Durrell's intended revisions marked out>> in the margins but at a library with no Durrell collection... Such>> things are too often tucked inside another author's papers, and who>> knows how many of them are spread out across the globe. Needless to>> say, LD never had the chance to revise the Revolt as he did the>> Quartet, so none of those revisions were ever realized, which is>> probably why he gifted the books away. What would he have done with>> the Quintet if he'd compiled it himself (the omnibus was put together>> in 1992, I think)?>>>> All best,>> James>>>> On 2015-06-21 7:31 PM, Sumantra Nag wrote:>>> Thanks James, for this valuable information about Durrell's familiarity>>> with Sacheverell Sitwell's writing.>>>>>> Sumantra>> _______________________________________________>> ILDS mailing list>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca >> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds>------------------------------Message: 3Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 00:29:52 +0200From: Marc Piel To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca, Bruce Redwine Subject: Re: [ilds] Durrell's libraryMessage-ID: <55888C60.5050709 at marcpiel.fr>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"; Format="flowed"Hi James and Bruce, As a graphic Designer in my early days (in England and France) I learned all ways to make typographic corrections, whether first proof or later corrections.... Maybe I can help decipher LD's marks. I feel certain that he knew them as well. Can you send me some images?Best regards,MarcLe 22/06/15 23:24, James Gifford a ?crit :> Hi Bruce,>> Alas, what I've seen of the Revolt revisions > included things such as "fix this" and then a > series of markings... Some of it's quite > unclear, but the extent of the revisions to the > Quartet is a good indicator.>> As for the Elizabethans, I believe virtually all > of that material is in Carbondale. From my > editing work, I can say his allusions and > references to his "Elizas" was extensive. A > read through "Prospero's Isle: To Caliban" > (1939, originally published in Shanghai) gives > an immediate sense of how capacious his readings > were, including a number of scholarly works -- > /Panic Spring/ was also particularly rich in > references to a range of Elizabethan dramatists.>> Best,> James>> On 2015-06-22 11:47 AM, Bruce Redwine wrote:>> That Durrell thought of revising /The Revolt of >> Aphrodite /is>> interesting. I wonder what would have come of >> it ? another equivalent>> to James?s New York Edition? I wish he?d >> completed that essay or book>> on the Elizabethans. He probably had a >> notebook on the subject. If so,>> where is it?>>>> Bruce>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Jun 22, 2015, at 1:02 AM, James Gifford >>> >> > wrote:>>>>>> I ought to have added, SIU Carbondale produced >>> a very helpful>>> bibliography of Durrell's library when they >>> acquired his papers, as>>> did Paris Ouest (available online). Quite a >>> bit of work, really.>>> Those are not exhaustive since so many of >>> LD's books pop up in other>>> archives around the world (and were lost in >>> WWII), and there's more>>> through Alan G. Thomas in the British Library >>> and LD's book requests>>> through publishers. Nonetheless, those two >>> (Carbondale & Paris) give>>> a pretty good sense of what was on his shelves >>> post-WWII.>>>>>> I'm reminded of the Library of Leonard & >>> Virginia Woolf held by>>> Washington State nearby, which is a beautiful >>> drive from here. It>>> would be hoped that some day a comparable >>> compilation of Durrell's>>> library could be centralized somewhere. It >>> makes me think of finding>>> copies of Tunc & Nunquam with Durrell's >>> intended revisions marked out>>> in the margins but at a library with no >>> Durrell collection... Such>>> things are too often tucked inside another >>> author's papers, and who>>> knows how many of them are spread out across >>> the globe. Needless to>>> say, LD never had the chance to revise the >>> Revolt as he did the>>> Quartet, so none of those revisions were ever >>> realized, which is>>> probably why he gifted the books away. What >>> would he have done with>>> the Quintet if he'd compiled it himself (the >>> omnibus was put together>>> in 1992, I think)?>>>>>> All best,>>> James>>>>>> On 2015-06-21 7:31 PM, Sumantra Nag wrote:>>>> Thanks James, for this valuable information >>>> about Durrell's familiarity>>>> with Sacheverell Sitwell's writing.>>>>>>>> Sumantra>>> _______________________________________________>>> ILDS mailing list>>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca >>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds>>> _______________________________________________> ILDS mailing list> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds-------------- next part --------------An HTML attachment was scrubbed...URL: ------------------------------Message: 4Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 06:01:10 -0700From: Bruce Redwine To: "marc at marcpiel.fr" ,	"ilds at lists.uvic.ca"	Subject: [ilds] Durrell's library, Durrell's ElizasMessage-ID: <269D0EA3-1C8A-46AE-9B65-34CA6F873F6E at earthlink.net>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"The revisions James is referring to are probably in the archives at Carbondale, Illinois. So they're not easily accessible.Beyond the fact that the Renaissance is the greatest period of English literature, I'd like to know if Durrell had a theory about its greatness. And by theory I mean something beyond statements about its rawness of life. We can look at his own work and infer this attitude. Poetry and horror probably have roles. Hence his revival of plays in verse. Too bad Bill Godshalk didn't complete his comparison of Middleton's Black Book and Durrell's.BruceSent from my iPhone> On Jun 22, 2015, at 3:29 PM, Marc Piel  wrote:> > Hi James and Bruce, As a graphic Designer in my early days (in England and France) I learned all ways to make typographic corrections, whether first proof or later corrections.... Maybe I can help decipher LD's marks. I feel certain that he knew them as well. Can you send me some images?> Best regards,> Marc> > Le 22/06/15 23:24, James Gifford a ?crit :>> Hi Bruce, >> >> Alas, what I've seen of the Revolt revisions included things such as "fix this" and then a series of markings... Some of it's quite unclear, but the extent of the revisions to the Quartet is a good indicator. >> >> As for the Elizabethans, I believe virtually all of that material is in Carbondale. >From my editing work, I can say his allusions and references to his "Elizas" was extensive. A read through "Prospero's Isle: To Caliban" (1939, originally published in Shanghai) gives an immediate sense of how capacious his readings were, including a number of scholarly works -- /Panic Spring/ was also particularly rich in references to a range of Elizabethan dramatists. >> >> Best, >> James >> >>> On 2015-06-22 11:47 AM, Bruce Redwine wrote: >>> That Durrell thought of revising /The Revolt of Aphrodite /is >>> interesting. I wonder what would have come of it ? another equivalent >>> to James?s New York Edition? I wish he?d completed that essay or book >>> on the Elizabethans. He probably had a notebook on the subject. If so, >>> where is it? >>> >>> Bruce >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>>> On Jun 22, 2015, at 1:02 AM, James Gifford >>> > wrote: >>>> >>>> I ought to have added, SIU Carbondale produced a very helpful >>>> bibliography of Durrell's library when they acquired his papers, as >>>> did Paris Ouest (available online). Quite a bit of work, really. >>>> Those are not exhaustive since so many of LD's books pop up in other >>>> archives around the world (and were lost in WWII), and there's more >>>> through Alan G. Thomas in the British Library and LD's book requests >>>> through publishers. Nonetheless, those two (Carbondale & Paris) give >>>> a pretty good sense of what was on his shelves post-WWII. >>>> >>>> I'm reminded of the Library of Leonard & Virginia Woolf held by >>>> Washington State nearby, which is a beautiful drive from here. It >>>> would be hoped that some day a comparable compilation of Durrell's >>>> library could be centralized somewhere. It makes me think of finding >>>> copies of Tunc & Nunquam with Durrell's intended revisions marked out >>>> in the margins but at a library with no Durrell collection... Such >>>> things are too often tucked inside another author's papers, and who >>>> knows how many of them are spread out across the globe. Needless to >>>> say, LD never had the chance to revise the Revolt as he did the >>>> Quartet, so none of those revisions were ever realized, which is >>>> probably why he gifted the books away. What would he have done with >>>> the Quintet if he'd compiled it himself (the omnibus was put together >>>> in 1992, I think)? >>>> >>>> All best, >>>> James >>>> >>>>> On 2015-06-21 7:31 PM, Sumantra Nag wrote: >>>>> Thanks James, for this valuable information about Durrell's familiarity >>>>> with Sacheverell Sitwell's writing. >>>>> >>>>> Sumantra>>>> _______________________________________________ >>>> ILDS mailing list >>>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca  >>>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds>> _______________________________________________ >> ILDS mailing list >> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca >> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds> > _______________________________________________> ILDS mailing list> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds-------------- next part --------------An HTML attachment was scrubbed...URL: ------------------------------Subject: Digest Footer_______________________________________________ILDS mailing listILDS at lists.uvic.cahttps://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds------------------------------End of ILDS Digest, Vol 98, Issue 7***********************************
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