[ilds] ILDS Digest, Vol 97, Issue 3_ Gifford's "Late Modernism's Migrations"

Bruce Redwine bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
Tue May 5 09:11:55 PDT 2015


Sumantra, I don’t think Durrell was a happy man, neither with himself nor with his world.  He was looking for a way to transcend both, and his “art” provided him with such a vehicle.  It gave him access to the “kingdom of the imagination.”  Compare that with the New Testament’s “king of heaven.”  Durrell’s mythical “Tibet” was another such place.  Once he had access to that realm, he no longer needed “art.”  It became “unnecessary.”  Or so he imagined.  This is just my opinion, of course.

Bruce





> On May 4, 2015, at 9:10 PM, Sumantra Nag <sumantranag at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Most interesting discussion on the generational change in the space occupied by art - if I may try to put it in such a small nutshell.
> 
> I have often thought about the following lines from Lawrence Durrell's poem Conon in Alexandria:
> 
> . . . .  
> Of a man 'engaged in bitterly waiting
> For the day when art should become unnecessary', 
> . . . .
> 
> Does art indeed become unnecessary in a certain environment or does it merely take a form which is not recognised as art by an older generation?
> 
> Has this perception of art - in a familiar form - fading into irrelevance not arisen during times of transforming social changes in human history?
> 
> Sumantra
> 
> Sent from my Samsung Tab
> 
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