[ilds] "Facts"

Bruce Redwine bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
Fri Jul 22 11:57:40 PDT 2011


Nancy strikes me as rather bitter, with justification, so I wonder if she liked the Quartet.


Bruce




On Jul 22, 2011, at 10:46 AM, Richard Pine wrote:

> Thanks for the link - but Penelope was mistaken. It's a common myth that Nancy did not read the Quartet - but she did.
> RP
> 
> From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
> To: Richard Pine <rpinecorfu at yahoo.com>; ilds at lists.uvic.ca
> Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
> Sent: Friday, July 22, 2011 8:03 PM
> Subject: Re: [ilds] "Facts"
> 
> I heard Penelope Durrell Hope make that statement about her mother at the Durrell Celebration, Alexandria, Egypt, 2007.  She made it to an audience of several hundred people and added that her mother was so angry that she refused to read anymore of her ex-husband's books.  I have reported this event in an article.  The link is below.
> 
> 
> Bruce
> 
> 
> 
> www.bu.edu/arion/files/2010/03/Melting-Mirage-Redwine.pdf
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Jul 22, 2011, at 9:33 AM, Richard Pine wrote:
> 
>> I'm not sure why it's said that Nancy called P's Cell 'all lies'. That certainly is not the impression to be gained from her biography by her daughter Joanna.
>> RP
>> 
>> From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
>> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>> Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
>> Sent: Friday, July 22, 2011 6:14 PM
>> Subject: [ilds] "Facts"
>> 
>> 1.  Fact:  Lawrence Durrell published the memoir Prospero's Cell in 1945.
>> 
>> 2.  Fiction posing as fact:  Much of the content of that book.
>> 
>> I once took no. 2 as fact, naively believing that Durrell truthfully reported people and events.  I was wrong.  Nancy Myers called it, "All lies."
>> 
>> 
>> Bruce
>> 
>> 
>> On Jul 22, 2011, at 12:33 AM, James Gifford wrote:
>> 
>>> Can you both be right?  "Facts" may be indisputable but equally useless 
>>> -- interpretations are shaky yet essential.  Of course, for "facts" 
>>> we're mainly dealing with words on paper, whether it's a legal document 
>>> or a book, and both have been known to lie or at least be subject to 
>>> revision a good deal of the time, and that's before we even consider our 
>>> various interpretive practices.
>>> 
>>> Isn't there a series of novels that uses this problem as a central theme?
>>> 
>>> The Durrellian "facts" have changed a good deal over time, and I've been 
>>> resiting the urge all day to quote 1933's "Bromo Bombastes":
>>> 
>>> "It's facts that attract us
>>>    Facts that attract us
>>>        Facts, facts, facts.
>>> Let’s have no subterfuge,
>>> Let’s have a deluge,
>>> A cataract of facts."
>>> 
>>> Surely LD took facts seriously enough to give them a chorus with such 
>>> gravitas, one followed by the East Wind swishing across the stage, 
>>> disguised in a beard...  Do you interpret this statement with irony?  Is 
>>> irony a "fact" or an interpretation?
>>> 
>>> Some on the list may recall with pleasure the performance of this short 
>>> play in 2000 on Corfu with Jim Nichols offering his glorious "Gawd!" in 
>>> a lead role as the Reporter.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> James
>>> 
>>> On 21/07/11 6:20 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>>> Depends on what you call a "fact."
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> On Jul 21, 2011, at 2:16 PM, Marc Piel wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> "Facts", by definition do not change, or they are not facts!
>>>>> 
>>>>> Le 21/07/11 22:23, Bruce Redwine a écrit :
>>>>>> Facts, biographical and otherwise, are tricky things and change over time
> 
> 

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