[ilds] ILDS Digest, Vol 47, Issue 5_Young man's book

Sumantra Nag sumantranag at gmail.com
Sun Feb 6 21:38:44 PST 2011


Bruce wrote: "My young man's book, however, is the Quartet, and I have very 
little affinity for Durrell's novel about his coming of age, except as a 
curiosity reflecting his early development.  (In 1960, I couldn't get beyond 
Lobo "catapulting" his penis [p. 23] and only completed the novel a couple 
of years ago, with very great difficulty.).."
----------------------------------
I must say The Alexandria Quartet was definitely my "young man's book" as 
well. And I have not been able to get very far with the Black Book to which 
I have gone back occasionally after the many references on the ILDS 
discussions.

Charles has said (Feb 3, 2011): "My preference is for the Quartet, which has 
given me most pleasure..."

I have also derived the most pleasure from the Quartet even though his books 
on the Greek islands (Corfu and Rhodes) and his poetry appealed greatly to 
my imagination. I cannot say the same for LD's later books. But this may not 
hold for many other readers and particualrly for scholars of Lawrence 
Durrell's works.

I sometimes wonder if my literary tastes have remained at the stage of the 
"young man's.."! But if Proust is more than a young man's literary fare, 
then I would say I have graduated in one direction at least, because I still 
derive pleasure from reading "In Search of Lost Time" (the very literal 
translation of the original French title which is now used instead of the 
older "Remembrance of Things Past") which I read long after I first read the 
AQ.

Regards

Sumantra

> Message: 3
> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2011 17:14:35 -0800
> From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
> Subject: Re: [ilds] TSE & BB
> To: gkoger at mindspring.com, ilds at lists.uvic.ca
> Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
> Message-ID: <4DE7FC11-7564-457E-AEC5-0C39E3B7899D at earthlink.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Grove,
>
> Yes.  The Black Book is definitely a young man's book (i.e., reader as 
> youth), and Graham Greene is absolutely right that "a writer's childhood 
> is his capital."  My young man's book, however, is the Quartet, and I have 
> very little affinity for Durrell's novel about his coming of age, except 
> as a curiosity reflecting his early development.  (In 1960, I couldn't get 
> beyond Lobo "catapulting" his penis [p. 23] and only completed the novel a 
> couple of years ago, with very great difficulty.) 



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