[ilds] The Egyptian Revolution

Marc Piel marcpiel at interdesign.fr
Mon Jan 31 04:09:09 PST 2011


The question is "is this really a revolution"? 
Countries like Companies can save themselves by 
changing bosses who have maintained a monopoly for 
so many years. We are not in the 1700-1800 any 
more and I doubt the Egyptian people would allow 
another dictatorship.
@+
Marc

Le 31/01/11 01:12, Bruce Redwine a écrit :
> I agree. A revolution in Egypt may be good for the bulk of the Egyptian
> people, but I do not think it augers well for cosmopolitanism — just the
> opposite. I expect the country will quickly become more Islamist. As has
> been pointed out, revolutions are inherently unstable. They may begin
> proclaiming democratic ideals, but they quickly turn totalitarian — the
> famous examples being the French and Russian. But who knows? I doubt
> that Durrell would have been optimistic — he'd seen too much.
>
>
> Bruce
>
>
>
> On Jan 30, 2011, at 2:40 PM, Lee Sternthal wrote:
>
>> will Alexandria become more secular again, never to return to
>> Durrell's Cosmpopolitan city, but perhaps a step back in that
>> direction? that would be a dream. i'm afraid not, though. i'm afraid
>> of who will fill the ensuing power vacuum should the present regime
>> fall. i imagine Durrell would have questions (and fears) about this as
>> well.
>>
>> On Sat, Jan 29, 2011 at 1:39 PM, Peters, John U
>> <john.u.peters at csun.edu <mailto:john.u.peters at csun.edu>> wrote:
>>
>>     The unfolding revolution in Egypt raises any number of questions,
>>     not least of which is this: What would L.D. make of it all? Or
>>     would he even try? Any thoughts? JP
>>     ________________________________________
>>     From: ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca> [ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>] On Behalf Of
>>     ilds-request at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds-request at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     [ilds-request at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds-request at lists.uvic.ca>]
>>     Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 12:00 PM
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Subject: ILDS Digest, Vol 46, Issue 13
>>
>>     Send ILDS mailing list submissions to
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>>
>>     Today's Topics:
>>
>>     1. The Dark Labyrinth (Bruce Redwine)
>>     2. Revolt of Aphrodite (James Gifford)
>>     3. OMG 17 - London (James Gifford)
>>     4. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (Denise Tart & David Green)
>>     5. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (James Gifford)
>>     6. Names (Bruce Redwine)
>>     7. Re: Names (James Gifford)
>>     8. Re: Names (Bruce Redwine)
>>     9. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (Anne R Zahlan)
>>     10. online bibliography (James Gifford)
>>     11. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (Bruce Redwine)
>>     12. Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th (James Gifford)
>>     13. MacNiven Bio (William Apt)
>>     14. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>)
>>     15. Re: Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th (Bruce Redwine)
>>     16. Re: Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th (James Gifford)
>>     17. Re: MacNiven Bio (Denise Tart & David Green)
>>     18. Re: MacNiven Bio (James Gifford)
>>     19. Re: MacNiven Bio (Denise Tart & David Green)
>>     20. the longer response to Bruce (James Gifford)
>>     21. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (James Gifford)
>>     22. Re: MacNiven Bio (Bruce Redwine)
>>     23. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (Bruce Redwine)
>>     24. Re: MacNiven Bio (Bruce Redwine)
>>     25. Re: Names (Richard Pine)
>>     26. Re: Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th (Richard Pine)
>>     27. Re: Names (Bruce Redwine)
>>     28. Re: Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th (Bruce Redwine)
>>     29. the purse (James Gifford)
>>     30. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>)
>>     31. Re: What has happened to the ilds list (James Gifford)
>>     32. Re: the purse (Bruce Redwine)
>>
>>
>>     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 1
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 11:55:05 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] The Dark Labyrinth
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <DE20C94A-2DC7-4B15-98F6-95508B01C7E3 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:DE20C94A-2DC7-4B15-98F6-95508B01C7E3 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>>
>>     Meta,
>>
>>     Thanks for picking up on this important topic/novel. Re Durrell's
>>     choice of personal names in The Dark Labyrinth, the first
>>     consideration is that he himself called the novel an "extended
>>     morality" (Durrell-Miller Letters, 1962, 1963, p. 201), i.e., an
>>     allegory. And allegories, as you know, personify ideas. The big
>>     examples of that form, in English, are Spenser's Faerie Queene and
>>     Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. These are both Renaissance works,
>>     early and late, so once again we have Durrell harkening back to
>>     the great period of English lit. In this regard, the novel's most
>>     interesting character, Campion, is also the name of a Renaissance
>>     medical doctor and poet, Thomas Campion (1567-1620). Durrell's
>>     usage of names fits the allegorical tradition. He also does this,
>>     however, elsewhere in his fiction, and I'd venture to say that the
>>     names of Durrell's characters most always mean something special
>>     They are rarely, if ever, arbitrary. It's useful to recall that
>>     Durrell himse!
>>     lf considered going into the medical profession and instead became
>>     a poet. Thus, Campion is a good alter ego for the author himself.
>>
>>     I agree that the "Roof of the World" chapter in The Dark Labyrinth
>>     is one of the best Durrell ever wrote. He pulls it off, writing
>>     about a Utopian place, and succeeds where James Hilton in Lost
>>     Horizon does not succeed in describing his Shangri-La. Hilton's
>>     Utopia is mawkish, Durrell's is not. Of course, Durrell's
>>     mountaintop realm is very Romantic, but the irony is Romantic too,
>>     the sad self-consciousness that forces the narrator to conclude,
>>     "The roof of the world did not really exist, except in their own
>>     imaginations." That statement echoes again and again throughout
>>     Durrell's oeuvre. It reminds me that repetitive "Boum" in
>>     Forster's Marabar caves.
>>
>>     Much remains to be talked about in this extraordinary novel. On a
>>     personal note, when I first read it in 1962, I recall that when
>>     Fearmax meets his fate in the labyrinth, at the end of "In the
>>     Darkness," I was terrified. Durrell can tell a good horror story.
>>     Durrell's terror, however, later turns into a kind of Romantic Irony.
>>
>>     Best wishes on your translation into Slovenian.
>>
>>
>>
>>     Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 2:58 AM, Meta Cerar wrote:
>>
>>     > Actually there are more ?18th century? names in the Dark
>>     Labyrinth, like TRUMAN for example. What an appropriate name for
>>     someone who ends up on the Roof of the World, which I agree is one
>>     of the most magnificent chapters in Durrell's entire opus, as one
>>     of the list members wrote recently.
>>     >
>>     > If anyone on the list knows of an article concerning the Cefalu
>>     or Dark Labyrinth names, I would be greatly interested. I am
>>     currently translating Dark Labyrinth into Slovenian ? to be
>>     published at the 100th anniversary of his birth (February 2012) ?
>>     and would love to include this symbolism into the preface of the book.
>>     >
>>     > I would also be grateful for any information on reviews or
>>     articles on this particular book, which I greatly enjoy working on
>>     although L.D. dismissed it as a potboiler. I think there was an
>>     article in Deus Loci about Otto Rank's influence on D.L. If anyone
>>     happens to be familiar with it, please let me know if it's worth
>>     reading.
>>     >
>>     > BTW, I loved the photos from Bellapais. What a great location
>>     for a future Durrell conference! I followed the Durrell trail
>>     throughout the Meditterranean but haven't been to Cyprus yet. The
>>     Villa Cleobolus and the ?Tree of idleness? in the old moslem
>>     graveyard in Rhodes are sadly neglected to my great disappointment.
>>     >
>>     > Looking forward to further commentaries on Dark Labyrinth,
>>     >
>>     > Meta Cerar,
>>     > Slovenia
>>     >
>>     > From: ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     [mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>] On Behalf Of Bruce Redwine
>>     > Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 10:43 PM
>>     > To: Denise Tart & David Green; ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >
>>     > Someone undoubtedly already has published an article on names in
>>     Cefalu, indeed throughout Durrell's fiction. My guess is that LD
>>     sometimes chose them as Shakespeare did his low-life characters:
>>     Mistress Quickly, Doll Tearsheet, Pistol, etc. People are their
>>     names. Doesn't Fearmax die of fright?
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > Bruce
>>     >
>>     > Sent from my iPhone
>>     >
>>     > On Jan 27, 2011, at 11:59 AM, "Denise Tart & David Green"
>>     <dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>> wrote:
>>     >
>>     >> I especially recommend the early chapter in Tunc describing
>>     Caradoc's drunken speech in front of the Parthenon. Grove
>>     >>
>>     >> It is probably fitting that I make a detailed literary analysis
>>     of Caradoc's speech - already seeing Durrell's juxtaposition of
>>     northern Celtic Caradoc and the souther classical Parthenon.
>>     >>
>>     >> btw, has anyone studied Durrell's names? I was very intrigued
>>     by them when reading Dark Labyrinth recently; Fearmax, Graecen -
>>     there something 18th century about it.
>>     >>
>>     >> David
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>
>>     -------------- next part --------------
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>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 2
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 12:10:33 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] Revolt of Aphrodite
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D4322B9.4040002 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D4322B9.4040002 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>>
>>     I agree that /Revolt/ is much overlooked, and I see it as remarkably
>>     contemporary today. As for scoffing at Durrell's "middlebrow" works,
>>     there's been a steady stream of critical work done -- I don't
>>     think any
>>     of the academics scoff. Instead, I think they're often just more
>>     difficult to get (they've been in & out of print and often appeared
>>     first through small presses rather than Faber), and they haven't
>>     had the
>>     same spotlight as his major books.
>>
>>     As for filthy lucre, I could see that for /White Eagles/ (though still
>>     an interesting work), but /Cefalu/ first appeared through the Poetry
>>     London imprint, which certainly wouldn't have earned Durrell a great
>>     deal, especially with Tambimuttu at the helm...
>>
>>     Jan Morris had high praise for /Sicilian Carousel/ as well:
>>
>>     Morris, Jan. "Durrell - on a Tourist Bus?" /Encounter/ 49.3 (September
>>     1977): 77-79.
>>
>>     The discussion of art in /Cefalu/ is fascinating as well, at least
>>     as a
>>     revelation of Durrell's interests and readings.
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>     On 27/01/11 10:47 AM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     > Reading /Aphrodite's Revolt,/ or periphrasis of same, is a good
>>     idea.
>>     > Long overdue, for me, anyway. Think I'll take Grove up on this.
>>     Ken's
>>     > comment about the Greek island books (which I'd expand to
>>     include Sicily
>>     > and the Tyrrhenian Sea) bears serious consideration. David Green
>>     > deserves full credit for turning our eyes to the islands ("no
>>     tongue:
>>     > all eyes: be silent"). Undoubtedly, Durrell's "potboilers" were
>>     done for
>>     > "filthy lucre," but I find them most interesting and provocative.
>>     > Durrell, for all his protean productivity, was probably one of
>>     Isaiah
>>     > Berlin's "hedgehogs," more of a possessed Dostoevsky than a foxy
>>     > Tolstoy. That's to say, he was a man of just a few obsessions (and
>>     > demons), and these got continually reworked and replayed
>>     throughout his
>>     > /oeuvre/. So, I find it instructive to uncover these themes and
>>     tropes
>>     > in his self-acknowledged "minor" works. E.g., /The Dark
>>     Labyrinth, White
>>     > Eagles over Serbia,/ and /Sicilian Carousel./ I sense these are
>>     often
>>     > scoffed at, but I think this view mistaken ? highbrow
>>     priggishness. To
>>     > emphasize what I said before, authors don't always know what
>>     they doing,
>>     > and whether Durrell knew it or not, his potboilers seem to me as
>>     > revealing (and probably at least as enjoyable) as his "serious" work
>>     > intended "for all time."
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > Bruce
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > On Jan 27, 2011, at 6:57 AM, gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>
>>     > <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>> wrote:
>>     >
>>     >> I've enjoyed the responses to David's post, but in my case my
>>     silence
>>     >> simply means that I'm busy and haven't had much to say. There are a
>>     >> couple of items about Norman Douglas and Patrick Leigh Fermor that
>>     >> I'll pass on as soon as I can put a few coherent paragraphs
>>     together,
>>     >> but in the meantime I'll second Ken's positive comment about
>>     The Greek
>>     >> Islands. And for those who haven't read Tunc and Nunquam, get busy!
>>     >> They're the most consistently underrated of Durrell's novels and
>>     >> deserve more attention. I'm not qualified to undertake a
>>     >> chapter-by-chapter analysis of them, but perhaps someone else could
>>     >> this summer. I especially recommend the early chapter in Tunc
>>     >> describing Caradoc's drunken speech in front of the Parthenon.
>>     Grove
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> -----Original Message-----
>>     >> From: Ken Gammage
>>     >> Sent: Jan 25, 2011 5:29 PM
>>     >> To: Denise Tart & David Green, "ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>"
>>     >> Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >>
>>     >> Very good David. A provocative post that should wake up the
>>     >> listserv! However, I?m not sure how well your example supports
>>     >> your argument. Rony sent a second post about Otto Rank that
>>     >> resulted in detailed and I?m sure very helpful responses from
>>     >> Charles Sligh and James Gifford. I have been a flagrant lurker for
>>     >> the past several years, enjoying the insightful and often
>>     >> beautiful writing by many thoughtful posters about Durrell, often
>>     >> responding directly and privately to the poster without
>>     >> necessarily having the courage to publicly offer my own sometimes
>>     >> contrary opinions (e.g. pro-The Greek Islands, where others find
>>     >> this coffee table book motivated strictly by lucre.)
>>     >> You see ? that?s why I seldom post. I can almost sense the
>>     >> artillery cranking into place, preparing a fusillade of
>>     >> disparagement at my poor taste in Island books! (I still like
>>     >> Prospero the best.) Please see my kind words about Durrell on the
>>     >> last page of my Italy website:www.travelogorrhea.com
>>     <http://www.travelogorrhea.com/>
>>     >> <http://www.travelogorrhea.com <http://www.travelogorrhea.com/>>
>>     >> Viva Durrell!
>>     >> Kennedy Gammage
>>     >> ken.gammage at directed.com <mailto:ken.gammage at directed.com>
>>     <mailto:ken.gammage at directed.com <mailto:ken.gammage at directed.com>>
>>     >> *From:*ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>>[mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>]*On
>>     >> Behalf Of*Denise Tart & David Green
>>     >> *Sent:*Tuesday, January 25, 2011 3:30 PM
>>     >> *To:*Durrel;DURRELL at LISTSERV.CC.UCF.EDU
>>     <mailto:Durrel%3BDURRELL at LISTSERV.CC.UCF.EDU>
>>     >> <mailto:DURRELL at LISTSERV.CC.UCF.EDU
>>     <mailto:DURRELL at LISTSERV.CC.UCF.EDU>>
>>     >> *Subject:*[ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >>
>>     >> It has come to my notice and the notice of one or two other
>>     >> contributors to this list that things have gone rather quiet in
>>     >> Durrell land over the last few weeks, months even, leaving me to
>>     >> ponder whatever happened to the lively debates and discussions of
>>     >> Durrell and his works?
>>     >>
>>     >> There seems to be no interest in keeping any kind of serious
>>     >> discussion going. Some large and well researched postings by me
>>     >> and some others, intended to stimulate discussion have disappeared
>>     >> without a trace. The general run of recent postings, few and far
>>     >> between, appear restricted to scholarly minutia or references to
>>     >> academic journals.
>>     >> There was almost no response to young Israeli student, Rony
>>     >> Alfandary, who appeared to be seeking some encouragement so that
>>     >> she can do her bit to promote LD in the world of scholarship.
>>     >> Unless some communication occurred off line, Bruce Redwine was the
>>     >> only member to publicly respond.
>>     >> Has there been a shift in policy re the ILDS List-Serve. Is it no
>>     >> longer a forum for discussion, since that can lead to controversy
>>     >> about M. Durrell's reputation? Currently there appears to be an
>>     >> aloofness on the part of certain contributors and a disinterest in
>>     >> endorsing anything substantive. Is the List now a place for the
>>     >> cognoscenti to say nice things to one another or merely to refer
>>     >> to items of Durrell scholarship, worthy as these things is in
>>     >> their own right?
>>     >> Where are all the so called lurkers? Where are all the people who
>>     >> used to pitch in have a say? Is the horse suffering from a
>>     >> terminal illness or is it just tired and resting up, unwilling at
>>     >> the moment to enter the forum of fiery debate about the life and
>>     >> works of the Hero of Kalamni, Bellapaix, Alexandria etc etc?
>>     >> Whatever happened to the spirit of L. Pursewarden, who wrote,
>>     >> "Protestant purely in the sense that I protest!"
>>     >> Yours, somewhat puzzled,
>>     >> David Green
>>     >> 16 William Street
>>     >> Marrickville NSW 2204
>>     >> Australia
>>     >>
>>     >> This email may contain confidential and/or privileged
>>     >> information. It is intended only for the person or persons to
>>     >> whom it is addressed. Any unauthorized review, use, or
>>     >> distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended
>>     >> recipient, please contact the sender by reply email or
>>     >> telephone and destroy all copies of the original message.
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> _______________________________________________
>>     >> ILDS mailing list
>>     >> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     >> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 3
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 12:35:52 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] OMG 17 - London
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D4328A8.8040003 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D4328A8.8040003 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>>
>>     I should add, I typed in "15" by accident, thinking back to the Paris
>>     conference. (head hung in shame). London will be the 17th On Miracle
>>     Ground, offering us a lucky prime number (and a Fermat Prime at
>>     that!).
>>
>>     Please create a substantial buzz in anticipation of the formal
>>     announcements!
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 4
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 07:21:09 +1100
>>     From: "Denise Tart & David Green" <dtart at bigpond.net.au
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: <ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     Message-ID: <575147F780284DA7A3C76E46D96858C2 at DenisePC>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>>
>>     Meta,
>>
>>     thanks for news about the Villa Cleobolus, sad though it is. I
>>     have been able to find Larry's other houses on Google Earth, but
>>     not the one in Rhodes. insidently, a Greek friend of mine reckons
>>     that Rhodes is the most beautiful island in the world which
>>     certainly comes through in the Marine Venus.
>>
>>     To the names in Dark Labyrinth, yes the names imply the characters
>>
>>     Graecen - the graceful and mannered lord.
>>     Campion - Champion, the hero of the piece - the shit stirring
>>     artist rebel type
>>     Fearmax - the enigmatic, withdrawn magician (maximum fear)
>>     The Truman's - true, honest ordinary people who achieve a mountain
>>     utopia (Durrell's hearkening back to his Indian Himalayan experiences)
>>
>>     etc etc
>>
>>     we recall in 18th century English Lit characters like Squire Booby
>>     (a booby being an ignorant boor) or squire Weston, he from the
>>     west country, a land of rowdy, drunken cider drinkers, the lord be
>>     good to them.
>>
>>     I also wonder about Quartet characters - Pursewarden for example
>>     (money guard) or Mountolive - who was Olive???
>>
>>     David Green
>>     Terra Australis Incognito
>>
>>
>>     From: Meta Cerar
>>     Sent: Friday, January 28, 2011 9:58 PM
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>
>>
>>     Actually there are more ?18th century? names in the Dark
>>     Labyrinth, like TRUMAN for example. What an appropriate name for
>>     someone who ends up on the Roof of the World, which I agree is one
>>     of the most magnificent chapters in Durrell's entire opus, as one
>>     of the list members wrote recently.
>>
>>
>>
>>     If anyone on the list knows of an article concerning the Cefalu or
>>     Dark Labyrinth names, I would be greatly interested. I am
>>     currently translating Dark Labyrinth into Slovenian - to be
>>     published at the 100th anniversary of his birth (February 2012) -
>>     and would love to include this symbolism into the preface of the book.
>>
>>
>>
>>     I would also be grateful for any information on reviews or
>>     articles on this particular book, which I greatly enjoy working on
>>     although L.D. dismissed it as a potboiler. I think there was an
>>     article in Deus Loci about Otto Rank's influence on D.L. If anyone
>>     happens to be familiar with it, please let me know if it's worth
>>     reading.
>>
>>
>>
>>     BTW, I loved the photos from Bellapais. What a great location for
>>     a future Durrell conference! I followed the Durrell trail
>>     throughout the Meditterranean but haven't been to Cyprus yet. The
>>     Villa Cleobolus and the ?Tree of idleness? in the old moslem
>>     graveyard in Rhodes are sadly neglected to my great disappointment.
>>
>>
>>
>>     Looking forward to further commentaries on Dark Labyrinth,
>>
>>
>>
>>     Meta Cerar,
>>
>>     Slovenia
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>     From: ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     [mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>] On Behalf Of Bruce Redwine
>>     Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 10:43 PM
>>     To: Denise Tart & David Green; ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>
>>
>>
>>     Someone undoubtedly already has published an article on names in
>>     Cefalu, indeed throughout Durrell's fiction. My guess is that LD
>>     sometimes chose them as Shakespeare did his low-life characters:
>>     Mistress Quickly, Doll Tearsheet, Pistol, etc. People are their
>>     names. Doesn't Fearmax die of fright?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     Bruce
>>
>>     Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 27, 2011, at 11:59 AM, "Denise Tart & David Green"
>>     <dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>> wrote:
>>
>>     I especially recommend the early chapter in Tunc describing
>>     Caradoc's drunken speech in front of the Parthenon. Grove
>>
>>     It is probably fitting that I make a detailed literary analysis of
>>     Caradoc's speech - already seeing Durrell's juxtaposition of
>>     northern Celtic Caradoc and the souther classical Parthenon.
>>
>>
>>
>>     btw, has anyone studied Durrell's names? I was very intrigued by
>>     them when reading Dark Labyrinth recently; Fearmax, Graecen -
>>     there something 18th century about it.
>>
>>
>>
>>     David
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     ILDS mailing list
>>     ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>
>>     --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     ILDS mailing list
>>     ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     -------------- next part --------------
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110129/2e2e39f8/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 5
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 13:21:01 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D43333D.9070101 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D43333D.9070101 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed
>>
>>     On 27/01/11 6:57 AM, gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com> wrote:
>>     > And for those who haven't read Tunc and Nunquam, get busy!
>>     They're the
>>     > most consistently underrated of Durrell's novels and deserve more
>>     > attention. I'm not qualified to undertake a chapter-by-chapter
>>     analysis
>>     > of them, but perhaps someone else could this summer.
>>
>>     Do I sense another reading group coming on? I'd enjoy that, and Tunc
>>     and Nunquam have been favourites of mine. Great suggestion, Grove!
>>     Let's plan for it this summer.
>>
>>     I'm of the (perhaps heretical) opinion that these are more political
>>     works than they let on, and that they show much about Durrell's 1930s
>>     and 40s activities that can otherwise be overlooked.
>>
>>     Caradoc's speech is grand, but I'm always struck by the inexplicable
>>     ending to /Nunquam/... I can't help but think of Durrell's
>>     publications
>>     in the anarchist press (NOW, New Road, Experimental Review, the New
>>     Apocalypse books, and so forth) and the ease with which an
>>     antiauthoritarian interpretation of his poetics can be made. Add to
>>     that mix the language of /Nunquam/'s last two pages 282-283 (law,
>>     authority, command, contractual obligation, and the fall of the
>>     state):
>>
>>     "which satisfied the law."
>>
>>     "the prophecy of Zeno has been occupying me, preoccupying me very
>>     much.
>>     Indeed I now feel it less as a prophecy than as a sort of command,
>>     from myself to myself"
>>
>>     "People will be afraid to take advantage of the fact that they have no
>>     contractual obligations."
>>
>>     "we have been dancing, dancing in complete happiness and
>>     accord.... even
>>     though Rome burns."
>>
>>     I may be just spotting things I'm looking for in other 1930s
>>     writers at
>>     the moment (Duncan, Rexroth, Miller, Leite, Woodcock, and others
>>     who are
>>     explicit about their anarchism and its influence on their style),
>>     but I
>>     can't help but see /The Revolt of Aphrodite/ through a perspective
>>     that
>>     asks about its implicit critique of corporatism and coercion in those
>>     terms. Certainly Durrell's vision isn't like Palahniuk's /Fight Club/,
>>     but there's something kindred. The state (Rome) falls, contracts end,
>>     law is obscured, yet the folks are in peace and accord, relying
>>     instead
>>     on their word and sociability.
>>
>>     The "Tunc aut Nunquam" moment is also cast in unusual terms for
>>     Durrell:
>>
>>     "Either everything will disintegrate, the Firm will begin to dissolve;
>>     or else nothing, Mr. Felix, absolutely nothing."
>>
>>     The Zeno prophecy first appears on pages 231-2, and this Zeno is a
>>     Greek
>>     clerk who has visions (his vision is of the novel's ending and the
>>     destruction of coercion and obligation). However, I can't help but
>>     take
>>     the reference to Zeno (and can a Classicist on here correct me?!
>>     Bruce?) as potentially a gesture to Kropotkin's entry in the
>>     Encyclopaedia Britannics's 11th edition (same entry for Durrell's 14th
>>     edition? I know the 14th was based on the 11th edition):
>>
>>     "The best exponent of anarchist philosophy in ancient Greece was Zeno
>>     [...] who distinctly opposed his conception of a free community
>>     without
>>     government to the state-utopia of Plato. He repudiated the omnipotence
>>     of the state, its intervention and regimentation, and proclaimed the
>>     sovereignty of the moral law of the individual -- remarking already
>>     that, while the necessary instinct of self-preservation leads man to
>>     egotism, nature has supplied a corrective to it by providing man with
>>     another instinct -- that of sociability. When men are reasonable
>>     enough
>>     to follow their natural instincts, they will unite across the
>>     frontiers
>>     and constitute the cosmos. They will have no need of law-courts or
>>     police, will have no temples and no public worship, and use no
>>     money --
>>     free gifts taking the place of the exchanges."
>>
>>     I think Plutarch describes Zeno failing to kill the tyrant Demylus so
>>     that "with his own teeth bit off his tongue, he spit it in the
>>     tyrant?s
>>     face."
>>
>>     I'm retracing some poetic networks that ran contrary to the Auden
>>     Generation, and most have an anarchist politics, so I may just
>>     have this
>>     in my head at the moment. Still, it seems like some anti-state or
>>     antiauthoritarian sentiments (which isn't so far from Durrell's open
>>     poetics) are present here.
>>
>>     At any rate, those are the things that have been occupying my mind
>>     lately with /The Revolt of Aphrodite/... What say y'all?
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 6
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 13:20:13 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] Names
>>     To: Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>,
>>     ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <2CCF2ABD-232B-4EA8-A0AF-A6C0DCD258F9 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:2CCF2ABD-232B-4EA8-A0AF-A6C0DCD258F9 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>>
>>     Pursewarden. Sometime ago, R. Pine, I believe, pointed out that
>>     Ludwig's surname was a pun or allusion to the scrotum. Or maybe I
>>     just have a dirty mind. Bill Godshalk can confirm this, either
>>     way. The OED, however, cites "scrotum" as a Renaissance meaning of
>>     purse. Cf. Iago's "Who steals my purse steals trash," where
>>     "purse," given Iago's lewd mind, probably refers to more than coins.
>>
>>     Mountolive. New Testament "Mount of Olives," associated with
>>     Christ's Passion and possibly the Garden of Gethsemane? Not clear
>>     how this applies to Sir David, unless you want to argue that in
>>     the Quartet the ambassador has his own Passion or passions to deal
>>     with. This may be Durrell being whimsical and irreverent. Still, a
>>     good name.
>>
>>
>>     Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 12:21 PM, Denise Tart & David Green wrote:
>>
>>     > Meta,
>>     >
>>     > thanks for news about the Villa Cleobolus, sad though it is. I
>>     have been able to find Larry's other houses on Google Earth, but
>>     not the one in Rhodes. insidently, a Greek friend of mine reckons
>>     that Rhodes is the most beautiful island in the world which
>>     certainly comes through in the Marine Venus.
>>     >
>>     > To the names in Dark Labyrinth, yes the names imply the characters
>>     >
>>     > Graecen - the graceful and mannered lord.
>>     > Campion - Champion, the hero of the piece - the shit stirring
>>     artist rebel type
>>     > Fearmax - the enigmatic, withdrawn magician (maximum fear)
>>     > The Truman's - true, honest ordinary people who achieve a
>>     mountain utopia (Durrell's hearkening back to his Indian Himalayan
>>     experiences)
>>     >
>>     > etc etc
>>     >
>>     > we recall in 18th century English Lit characters like Squire
>>     Booby (a booby being an ignorant boor) or squire Weston, he from
>>     the west country, a land of rowdy, drunken cider drinkers, the
>>     lord be good to them.
>>     >
>>     > I also wonder about Quartet characters - Pursewarden for example
>>     (money guard) or Mountolive - who was Olive???
>>     >
>>     > David Green
>>     > Terra Australis Incognito
>>     >
>>     > From: Meta Cerar
>>     > Sent: Friday, January 28, 2011 9:58 PM
>>     > To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >
>>     > Actually there are more ?18th century? names in the Dark
>>     Labyrinth, like TRUMAN for example. What an appropriate name for
>>     someone who ends up on the Roof of the World, which I agree is one
>>     of the most magnificent chapters in Durrell's entire opus, as one
>>     of the list members wrote recently.
>>     >
>>     > If anyone on the list knows of an article concerning the Cefalu
>>     or Dark Labyrinth names, I would be greatly interested. I am
>>     currently translating Dark Labyrinth into Slovenian ? to be
>>     published at the 100th anniversary of his birth (February 2012) ?
>>     and would love to include this symbolism into the preface of the book.
>>     >
>>     > I would also be grateful for any information on reviews or
>>     articles on this particular book, which I greatly enjoy working on
>>     although L.D. dismissed it as a potboiler. I think there was an
>>     article in Deus Loci about Otto Rank's influence on D.L. If anyone
>>     happens to be familiar with it, please let me know if it's worth
>>     reading.
>>     >
>>     > BTW, I loved the photos from Bellapais. What a great location
>>     for a future Durrell conference! I followed the Durrell trail
>>     throughout the Meditterranean but haven't been to Cyprus yet. The
>>     Villa Cleobolus and the ?Tree of idleness? in the old moslem
>>     graveyard in Rhodes are sadly neglected to my great disappointment.
>>     >
>>     > Looking forward to further commentaries on Dark Labyrinth,
>>     >
>>     > Meta Cerar,
>>     > Slovenia
>>     >
>>     > From: ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     [mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>] On Behalf Of Bruce Redwine
>>     > Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 10:43 PM
>>     > To: Denise Tart & David Green; ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >
>>     > Someone undoubtedly already has published an article on names in
>>     Cefalu, indeed throughout Durrell's fiction. My guess is that LD
>>     sometimes chose them as Shakespeare did his low-life characters:
>>     Mistress Quickly, Doll Tearsheet, Pistol, etc. People are their
>>     names. Doesn't Fearmax die of fright?
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > Bruce
>>     >
>>     > Sent from my iPhone
>>     >
>>     > On Jan 27, 2011, at 11:59 AM, "Denise Tart & David Green"
>>     <dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>> wrote:
>>     >
>>     >> I especially recommend the early chapter in Tunc describing
>>     Caradoc's drunken speech in front of the Parthenon. Grove
>>     >>
>>     >> It is probably fitting that I make a detailed literary analysis
>>     of Caradoc's speech - already seeing Durrell's juxtaposition of
>>     northern Celtic Caradoc and the souther classical Parthenon.
>>     >>
>>     >> btw, has anyone studied Durrell's names? I was very intrigued
>>     by them when reading Dark Labyrinth recently; Fearmax, Graecen -
>>     there something 18th century about it.
>>     >>
>>     >> David
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>
>>     -------------- next part --------------
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110128/95341739/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 7
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 13:26:53 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] Names
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D43349D.7020301 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D43349D.7020301 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>>
>>     Hi Bruce,
>>
>>     Unless I'm mistaken, Durrell uses the "purse/scrotum" idea himself
>>     when
>>     talking about Wilde and Shakespeare. It's not in his UNESCO talks, but
>>     I can't recall where...
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>     On 28/01/11 1:20 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     > *Pursewarden.* Sometime ago, R. Pine, I believe, pointed out that
>>     > Ludwig's surname was a pun or allusion to the scrotum. Or maybe
>>     I just
>>     > have a dirty mind. Bill Godshalk can confirm this, either way.
>>     The OED,
>>     > however, cites "scrotum" as a Renaissance meaning of purse. Cf.
>>     Iago's
>>     > "Who steals my purse steals trash," where "purse," given Iago's lewd
>>     > mind, probably refers to more than coins.
>>     >
>>     > *Mountolive.* New Testament "Mount of Olives," associated with
>>     Christ's
>>     > Passion and possibly the Garden of Gethsemane? Not clear how this
>>     > applies to Sir David, unless you want to argue that in the
>>     /Quartet/ the
>>     > ambassador has his own Passion or passions to deal with. This may be
>>     > Durrell being whimsical and irreverent. Still, a good name.
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > Bruce
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > On Jan 28, 2011, at 12:21 PM, Denise Tart & David Green wrote:
>>     >
>>     >> Meta,
>>     >> thanks for news about the Villa Cleobolus, sad though it is. I have
>>     >> been able to find Larry's other houses on Google Earth, but not the
>>     >> one in Rhodes. insidently, a Greek friend of mine reckons that
>>     Rhodes
>>     >> is the most beautiful island in the world which certainly comes
>>     >> through in the Marine Venus.
>>     >> To the names in Dark Labyrinth, yes the names imply the characters
>>     >> Graecen - the graceful and mannered lord.
>>     >> Campion - Champion, the hero of the piece - the shit stirring
>>     artist
>>     >> rebel type
>>     >> Fearmax - the enigmatic, withdrawn magician (maximum fear)
>>     >> The Truman's - true, honest ordinary people who achieve a mountain
>>     >> utopia (Durrell's hearkening back to his Indian Himalayan
>>     experiences)
>>     >> etc etc
>>     >> we recall in 18th century English Lit characters like Squire
>>     Booby (a
>>     >> booby being an ignorant boor) or squire Weston, he from the west
>>     >> country, a land of rowdy, drunken cider drinkers, the lord be
>>     good to
>>     >> them.
>>     >> I also wonder about Quartet characters - Pursewarden for example
>>     >> (money guard) or Mountolive - who was Olive???
>>     >> David Green
>>     >> Terra Australis Incognito
>>     >>
>>     >> *From:*Meta Cerar <mailto:meta.cerar at guest.arnes.si
>>     <mailto:meta.cerar at guest.arnes.si>>
>>     >> *Sent:*Friday, January 28, 2011 9:58 PM
>>     >> *To:*ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     >> *Subject:*Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >>
>>     >> Actually there are more ?18th century? names in the Dark Labyrinth,
>>     >> like TRUMAN for example. What an appropriate name for someone
>>     who ends
>>     >> up on the Roof of the World, which I agree is one of the most
>>     >> magnificent chapters in Durrell's entire opus, as one of the list
>>     >> members wrote recently.
>>     >> If anyone on the list knows of an article concerning the Cefalu or
>>     >> Dark Labyrinth names, I would be greatly interested. I am currently
>>     >> translating Dark Labyrinth into Slovenian ? to be published at the
>>     >> 100th anniversary of his birth (February 2012) ? and would love to
>>     >> include this symbolism into the preface of the book.
>>     >> I would also be grateful for any information on reviews or
>>     articles on
>>     >> this particular book, which I greatly enjoy working on although
>>     L.D.
>>     >> dismissed it as a potboiler. I think there was an article in
>>     Deus Loci
>>     >> about Otto Rank's influence on D.L. If anyone happens to be
>>     familiar
>>     >> with it, please let me know if it's worth reading.
>>     >> BTW, I loved the photos from Bellapais. What a great location for a
>>     >> future Durrell conference! I followed the Durrell trail
>>     throughout the
>>     >> Meditterranean but haven't been to Cyprus yet. The Villa
>>     Cleobolus and
>>     >> the ?Tree of idleness? in the old moslem graveyard in Rhodes
>>     are sadly
>>     >> neglected to my great disappointment.
>>     >> Looking forward to further commentaries on Dark Labyrinth,
>>     >> Meta Cerar,
>>     >> Slovenia
>>     >>
>>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>     >> *From:*ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>>[mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>]*On
>>     >> Behalf Of*Bruce Redwine
>>     >> *Sent:*Thursday, January 27, 2011 10:43 PM
>>     >> *To:*Denise Tart & David Green;ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:Green%3Bilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     >> *Subject:*Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >> Someone undoubtedly already has published an article on names in
>>     >> Cefalu, indeed throughout Durrell's fiction. My guess is that LD
>>     >> sometimes chose them as Shakespeare did his low-life characters:
>>     >> Mistress Quickly, Doll Tearsheet, Pistol, etc. People are their
>>     names.
>>     >> Doesn't Fearmax die of fright?
>>     >> Bruce
>>     >>
>>     >> Sent from my iPhone
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> On Jan 27, 2011, at 11:59 AM, "Denise Tart & David Green"
>>     >> <dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>> wrote:
>>     >>
>>     >>> I especially recommend the early chapter in Tunc describing
>>     Caradoc's
>>     >>> drunken speech in front of the Parthenon. Grove
>>     >>>
>>     >>> It is probably fitting that I make a detailed literary analysis of
>>     >>> Caradoc's speech - already seeing Durrell's juxtaposition of
>>     northern
>>     >>> Celtic Caradoc and the souther classical Parthenon.
>>     >>> btw, has anyone studied Durrell's names? I was very intrigued
>>     by them
>>     >>> when reading Dark Labyrinth recently; Fearmax, Graecen - there
>>     >>> something 18th century about it.
>>     >>> David
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 8
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 13:33:50 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] Names
>>     To: gifford at fdu.edu <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>, ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <19F230A3-2799-4CC4-B1FA-A16EBB742E4B at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:19F230A3-2799-4CC4-B1FA-A16EBB742E4B at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>>
>>     Thanks. That confirms the linkage. It's amazing how saturated
>>     Durrell was in Renaissance English. He probably dreamed in blank
>>     verse.
>>
>>
>>     BR
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 1:26 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>
>>     > Hi Bruce,
>>     >
>>     > Unless I'm mistaken, Durrell uses the "purse/scrotum" idea
>>     himself when
>>     > talking about Wilde and Shakespeare. It's not in his UNESCO
>>     talks, but
>>     > I can't recall where...
>>     >
>>     > Best,
>>     > James
>>     >
>>     > On 28/01/11 1:20 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     >> *Pursewarden.* Sometime ago, R. Pine, I believe, pointed out that
>>     >> Ludwig's surname was a pun or allusion to the scrotum. Or maybe
>>     I just
>>     >> have a dirty mind. Bill Godshalk can confirm this, either way.
>>     The OED,
>>     >> however, cites "scrotum" as a Renaissance meaning of purse. Cf.
>>     Iago's
>>     >> "Who steals my purse steals trash," where "purse," given Iago's
>>     lewd
>>     >> mind, probably refers to more than coins.
>>     >>
>>     >> *Mountolive.* New Testament "Mount of Olives," associated with
>>     Christ's
>>     >> Passion and possibly the Garden of Gethsemane? Not clear how this
>>     >> applies to Sir David, unless you want to argue that in the
>>     /Quartet/ the
>>     >> ambassador has his own Passion or passions to deal with. This
>>     may be
>>     >> Durrell being whimsical and irreverent. Still, a good name.
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> Bruce
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> On Jan 28, 2011, at 12:21 PM, Denise Tart & David Green wrote:
>>     >>
>>     >>> Meta,
>>     >>> thanks for news about the Villa Cleobolus, sad though it is. I
>>     have
>>     >>> been able to find Larry's other houses on Google Earth, but
>>     not the
>>     >>> one in Rhodes. insidently, a Greek friend of mine reckons that
>>     Rhodes
>>     >>> is the most beautiful island in the world which certainly comes
>>     >>> through in the Marine Venus.
>>     >>> To the names in Dark Labyrinth, yes the names imply the characters
>>     >>> Graecen - the graceful and mannered lord.
>>     >>> Campion - Champion, the hero of the piece - the shit stirring
>>     artist
>>     >>> rebel type
>>     >>> Fearmax - the enigmatic, withdrawn magician (maximum fear)
>>     >>> The Truman's - true, honest ordinary people who achieve a mountain
>>     >>> utopia (Durrell's hearkening back to his Indian Himalayan
>>     experiences)
>>     >>> etc etc
>>     >>> we recall in 18th century English Lit characters like Squire
>>     Booby (a
>>     >>> booby being an ignorant boor) or squire Weston, he from the west
>>     >>> country, a land of rowdy, drunken cider drinkers, the lord be
>>     good to
>>     >>> them.
>>     >>> I also wonder about Quartet characters - Pursewarden for example
>>     >>> (money guard) or Mountolive - who was Olive???
>>     >>> David Green
>>     >>> Terra Australis Incognito
>>     >>>
>>     >>> *From:*Meta Cerar <mailto:meta.cerar at guest.arnes.si
>>     <mailto:meta.cerar at guest.arnes.si>>
>>     >>> *Sent:*Friday, January 28, 2011 9:58 PM
>>     >>> *To:*ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     >>> *Subject:*Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >>>
>>     >>> Actually there are more ?18th century? names in the Dark
>>     Labyrinth,
>>     >>> like TRUMAN for example. What an appropriate name for someone
>>     who ends
>>     >>> up on the Roof of the World, which I agree is one of the most
>>     >>> magnificent chapters in Durrell's entire opus, as one of the list
>>     >>> members wrote recently.
>>     >>> If anyone on the list knows of an article concerning the Cefalu or
>>     >>> Dark Labyrinth names, I would be greatly interested. I am
>>     currently
>>     >>> translating Dark Labyrinth into Slovenian ? to be published at the
>>     >>> 100th anniversary of his birth (February 2012) ? and would love to
>>     >>> include this symbolism into the preface of the book.
>>     >>> I would also be grateful for any information on reviews or
>>     articles on
>>     >>> this particular book, which I greatly enjoy working on
>>     although L.D.
>>     >>> dismissed it as a potboiler. I think there was an article in
>>     Deus Loci
>>     >>> about Otto Rank's influence on D.L. If anyone happens to be
>>     familiar
>>     >>> with it, please let me know if it's worth reading.
>>     >>> BTW, I loved the photos from Bellapais. What a great location
>>     for a
>>     >>> future Durrell conference! I followed the Durrell trail
>>     throughout the
>>     >>> Meditterranean but haven't been to Cyprus yet. The Villa
>>     Cleobolus and
>>     >>> the ?Tree of idleness? in the old moslem graveyard in Rhodes
>>     are sadly
>>     >>> neglected to my great disappointment.
>>     >>> Looking forward to further commentaries on Dark Labyrinth,
>>     >>> Meta Cerar,
>>     >>> Slovenia
>>     >>>
>>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>     >>> *From:*ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >>> <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>>[mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>]*On
>>     >>> Behalf Of*Bruce Redwine
>>     >>> *Sent:*Thursday, January 27, 2011 10:43 PM
>>     >>> *To:*Denise Tart & David Green;ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:Green%3Bilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >>> <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     >>> *Subject:*Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >>> Someone undoubtedly already has published an article on names in
>>     >>> Cefalu, indeed throughout Durrell's fiction. My guess is that LD
>>     >>> sometimes chose them as Shakespeare did his low-life characters:
>>     >>> Mistress Quickly, Doll Tearsheet, Pistol, etc. People are
>>     their names.
>>     >>> Doesn't Fearmax die of fright?
>>     >>> Bruce
>>     >>>
>>     >>> Sent from my iPhone
>>     >>>
>>     >>>
>>     >>> On Jan 27, 2011, at 11:59 AM, "Denise Tart & David Green"
>>     >>> <dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>> wrote:
>>     >>>
>>     >>>> I especially recommend the early chapter in Tunc describing
>>     Caradoc's
>>     >>>> drunken speech in front of the Parthenon. Grove
>>     >>>>
>>     >>>> It is probably fitting that I make a detailed literary
>>     analysis of
>>     >>>> Caradoc's speech - already seeing Durrell's juxtaposition of
>>     northern
>>     >>>> Celtic Caradoc and the souther classical Parthenon.
>>     >>>> btw, has anyone studied Durrell's names? I was very intrigued
>>     by them
>>     >>>> when reading Dark Labyrinth recently; Fearmax, Graecen - there
>>     >>>> something 18th century about it.
>>     >>>> David
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> _______________________________________________
>>     >> ILDS mailing list
>>     >> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 9
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 16:55:10 -0500
>>     From: "Anne R Zahlan" <zahlan at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:zahlan at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: <gifford at fdu.edu <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>>,
>>     <ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     Message-ID: <5A956F8BADFF4A439E45C75187D5EB94 at annezahlan1>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
>>     reply-type=original
>>
>>     Hi Jamie:
>>
>>     Any chance you could get some help with updating the bibliography,
>>     Web site
>>     etc.? You can't do it all anymore and perhaps you could find a
>>     talented and
>>     careful grad student.
>>
>>     (Delegating is the sign of a good executive.)
>>
>>     Looking forward to seeing you soon and hope job stuff is going well.
>>
>>     Love,
>>
>>     Anne
>>     ----- Original Message -----
>>     From: "James Gifford" <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     To: <ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     Sent: Friday, January 28, 2011 2:28 PM
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>
>>
>>     > Hello all,
>>     >
>>     > For articles, I realize the online bibliography hasn't been updated
>>     > since 2007, but it's an easy-to-access alternative:
>>     >
>>     > http://www.lawrencedurrell.org/bibhome.htm
>>     >
>>     > Hopefully time will permit a systematic update soon. I have
>>     hundred of
>>     > items to add to it still...
>>     >
>>     > Best,
>>     > James
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     >
>>
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 10
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 14:35:44 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] online bibliography
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D4344C0.2030000 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D4344C0.2030000 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>>
>>     Hi Anne,
>>
>>     Good to hear from you!
>>
>>     For everyone on the list, please consider this an open call for help
>>     with the online bibliography. James Clawson and Grove Koger have
>>     volunteered (at the last conference) to get involved, but I do suspect
>>     that maintaining an online bibliography will necessitate a level of
>>     technical expertise and free time that the three of us will find
>>     challenging... Grove is doing admirable work keeping the print
>>     bibliography going in /Deus Loci/ as the formal record, but there's a
>>     lot of secondary criticism out there still, especially in other
>>     languages.
>>
>>     I first launched the online bibliography as a way of making such work
>>     easily available in a searchable format. That creative commons idea
>>     would still be my preference -- what say you all? Proprietary systems
>>     are easy to transfer to (RefWorks), but then they're proprietary and
>>     hard to open up publicly.
>>
>>     Does anyone have experience with RefShare?
>>
>>     Alternatively, the bibliography is already available (in a rough form)
>>     in BibTex, which is easy to update and is compatible with almost any
>>     citation management software, including many OpenSource and free
>>     applications.
>>
>>     As I noted in the first launch, "The Koger-MacNiven Bibliography has
>>     been particularly useful, and Susan MacNiven's encouragement has been
>>     greatly appreciated. Other major bibliographers include Cecil L.
>>     Peaden,
>>     Susan Vander Closter, James Brigham, and Alan G. Thomas." Those
>>     are all
>>     still excellent resources.
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>     On 28/01/11 1:55 PM, Anne R Zahlan wrote:
>>     > Hi Jamie:
>>     >
>>     > Any chance you could get some help with updating the
>>     bibliography, Web site
>>     > etc.? You can't do it all anymore and perhaps you could find a
>>     talented and
>>     > careful grad student.
>>     >
>>     > (Delegating is the sign of a good executive.)
>>     >
>>     > Looking forward to seeing you soon and hope job stuff is going well.
>>     >
>>     > Love,
>>     >
>>     > Anne
>>     > ----- Original Message -----
>>     > From: "James Gifford"<james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     > To:<ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     > Sent: Friday, January 28, 2011 2:28 PM
>>     > Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >> Hello all,
>>     >>
>>     >> For articles, I realize the online bibliography hasn't been updated
>>     >> since 2007, but it's an easy-to-access alternative:
>>     >>
>>     >> http://www.lawrencedurrell.org/bibhome.htm
>>     >>
>>     >> Hopefully time will permit a systematic update soon. I have
>>     hundred of
>>     >> items to add to it still...
>>     >>
>>     >> Best,
>>     >> James
>>     >> _______________________________________________
>>     >> ILDS mailing list
>>     >> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     >>
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 11
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 14:38:19 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: gifford at fdu.edu <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>, ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <452C6366-484D-4FDF-8D81-87214664BD8F at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:452C6366-484D-4FDF-8D81-87214664BD8F at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>>
>>     James,
>>
>>     Tell me which entry in the 11th ed. of EB, I'll check it for you.
>>
>>
>>     Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 1:21 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>
>>     > On 27/01/11 6:57 AM, gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com> wrote:
>>     >> And for those who haven't read Tunc and Nunquam, get busy!
>>     They're the
>>     >> most consistently underrated of Durrell's novels and deserve more
>>     >> attention. I'm not qualified to undertake a chapter-by-chapter
>>     analysis
>>     >> of them, but perhaps someone else could this summer.
>>     >
>>     > Do I sense another reading group coming on? I'd enjoy that, and Tunc
>>     > and Nunquam have been favourites of mine. Great suggestion, Grove!
>>     > Let's plan for it this summer.
>>     >
>>     > I'm of the (perhaps heretical) opinion that these are more political
>>     > works than they let on, and that they show much about Durrell's
>>     1930s
>>     > and 40s activities that can otherwise be overlooked.
>>     >
>>     > Caradoc's speech is grand, but I'm always struck by the inexplicable
>>     > ending to /Nunquam/... I can't help but think of Durrell's
>>     publications
>>     > in the anarchist press (NOW, New Road, Experimental Review, the New
>>     > Apocalypse books, and so forth) and the ease with which an
>>     > antiauthoritarian interpretation of his poetics can be made. Add to
>>     > that mix the language of /Nunquam/'s last two pages 282-283 (law,
>>     > authority, command, contractual obligation, and the fall of the
>>     state):
>>     >
>>     > "which satisfied the law."
>>     >
>>     > "the prophecy of Zeno has been occupying me, preoccupying me
>>     very much.
>>     > Indeed I now feel it less as a prophecy than as a sort of command,
>>     > from myself to myself"
>>     >
>>     > "People will be afraid to take advantage of the fact that they
>>     have no
>>     > contractual obligations."
>>     >
>>     > "we have been dancing, dancing in complete happiness and
>>     accord.... even
>>     > though Rome burns."
>>     >
>>     > I may be just spotting things I'm looking for in other 1930s
>>     writers at
>>     > the moment (Duncan, Rexroth, Miller, Leite, Woodcock, and others
>>     who are
>>     > explicit about their anarchism and its influence on their
>>     style), but I
>>     > can't help but see /The Revolt of Aphrodite/ through a
>>     perspective that
>>     > asks about its implicit critique of corporatism and coercion in
>>     those
>>     > terms. Certainly Durrell's vision isn't like Palahniuk's /Fight
>>     Club/,
>>     > but there's something kindred. The state (Rome) falls, contracts
>>     end,
>>     > law is obscured, yet the folks are in peace and accord, relying
>>     instead
>>     > on their word and sociability.
>>     >
>>     > The "Tunc aut Nunquam" moment is also cast in unusual terms for
>>     Durrell:
>>     >
>>     > "Either everything will disintegrate, the Firm will begin to
>>     dissolve;
>>     > or else nothing, Mr. Felix, absolutely nothing."
>>     >
>>     > The Zeno prophecy first appears on pages 231-2, and this Zeno is
>>     a Greek
>>     > clerk who has visions (his vision is of the novel's ending and the
>>     > destruction of coercion and obligation). However, I can't help
>>     but take
>>     > the reference to Zeno (and can a Classicist on here correct me?!
>>     > Bruce?) as potentially a gesture to Kropotkin's entry in the
>>     > Encyclopaedia Britannics's 11th edition (same entry for
>>     Durrell's 14th
>>     > edition? I know the 14th was based on the 11th edition):
>>     >
>>     > "The best exponent of anarchist philosophy in ancient Greece was
>>     Zeno
>>     > [...] who distinctly opposed his conception of a free community
>>     without
>>     > government to the state-utopia of Plato. He repudiated the
>>     omnipotence
>>     > of the state, its intervention and regimentation, and proclaimed the
>>     > sovereignty of the moral law of the individual -- remarking already
>>     > that, while the necessary instinct of self-preservation leads man to
>>     > egotism, nature has supplied a corrective to it by providing man
>>     with
>>     > another instinct -- that of sociability. When men are reasonable
>>     enough
>>     > to follow their natural instincts, they will unite across the
>>     frontiers
>>     > and constitute the cosmos. They will have no need of law-courts or
>>     > police, will have no temples and no public worship, and use no
>>     money --
>>     > free gifts taking the place of the exchanges."
>>     >
>>     > I think Plutarch describes Zeno failing to kill the tyrant
>>     Demylus so
>>     > that "with his own teeth bit off his tongue, he spit it in the
>>     tyrant?s
>>     > face."
>>     >
>>     > I'm retracing some poetic networks that ran contrary to the Auden
>>     > Generation, and most have an anarchist politics, so I may just
>>     have this
>>     > in my head at the moment. Still, it seems like some anti-state or
>>     > antiauthoritarian sentiments (which isn't so far from Durrell's open
>>     > poetics) are present here.
>>     >
>>     > At any rate, those are the things that have been occupying my mind
>>     > lately with /The Revolt of Aphrodite/... What say y'all?
>>     >
>>     > Best,
>>     > James
>>     >
>>
>>     -------------- next part --------------
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110128/6cffe788/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 12
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 14:50:12 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D434824.1090100 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D434824.1090100 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>>
>>     Hi Bruce,
>>
>>     Peter Kropotkin wrote the "Anarchism" entry to the 11th edition in
>>     1905
>>     (Wilde even quotes Kropotkin, without reference, in "The Soul of Man
>>     Under Socialism").
>>
>>     As I understand it, the 14th edition (which Durrell had on Corfu) was
>>     largely a reversion to the 11th edition that added new entries and
>>     made
>>     cuts to existing entries. If you have access, I'd appreciate it!! I
>>     can get it online through my library, but it doesn't allow the
>>     comparison between past editions.
>>
>>     I believe the DSC Library has the 14th edition on its shelves too.
>>
>>     Thanks!
>>     James
>>
>>     On 28/01/11 2:38 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     > James,
>>     >
>>     > Tell me which entry in the 11th ed. of /EB,/ I'll check it for you.
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > Bruce
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > On Jan 28, 2011, at 1:21 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>     >
>>     >> On 27/01/11 6:57 AM, gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>
>>     >> <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>>
>>     wrote:
>>     >>> And for those who haven't read Tunc and Nunquam, get busy!
>>     They're the
>>     >>> most consistently underrated of Durrell's novels and deserve more
>>     >>> attention. I'm not qualified to undertake a chapter-by-chapter
>>     analysis
>>     >>> of them, but perhaps someone else could this summer.
>>     >>
>>     >> Do I sense another reading group coming on? I'd enjoy that, and
>>     Tunc
>>     >> and Nunquam have been favourites of mine. Great suggestion, Grove!
>>     >> Let's plan for it this summer.
>>     >>
>>     >> I'm of the (perhaps heretical) opinion that these are more
>>     political
>>     >> works than they let on, and that they show much about Durrell's
>>     1930s
>>     >> and 40s activities that can otherwise be overlooked.
>>     >>
>>     >> Caradoc's speech is grand, but I'm always struck by the
>>     inexplicable
>>     >> ending to /Nunquam/... I can't help but think of Durrell's
>>     publications
>>     >> in the anarchist press (NOW, New Road, Experimental Review, the New
>>     >> Apocalypse books, and so forth) and the ease with which an
>>     >> antiauthoritarian interpretation of his poetics can be made. Add to
>>     >> that mix the language of /Nunquam/'s last two pages 282-283 (law,
>>     >> authority, command, contractual obligation, and the fall of the
>>     state):
>>     >>
>>     >> "which satisfied the law."
>>     >>
>>     >> "the prophecy of Zeno has been occupying me, preoccupying me
>>     very much.
>>     >> Indeed I now feel it less as a prophecy than as a sort of command,
>>     >> from myself to myself"
>>     >>
>>     >> "People will be afraid to take advantage of the fact that they
>>     have no
>>     >> contractual obligations."
>>     >>
>>     >> "we have been dancing, dancing in complete happiness and
>>     accord.... even
>>     >> though Rome burns."
>>     >>
>>     >> I may be just spotting things I'm looking for in other 1930s
>>     writers at
>>     >> the moment (Duncan, Rexroth, Miller, Leite, Woodcock, and
>>     others who are
>>     >> explicit about their anarchism and its influence on their
>>     style), but I
>>     >> can't help but see /The Revolt of Aphrodite/ through a
>>     perspective that
>>     >> asks about its implicit critique of corporatism and coercion in
>>     those
>>     >> terms. Certainly Durrell's vision isn't like Palahniuk's /Fight
>>     Club/,
>>     >> but there's something kindred. The state (Rome) falls,
>>     contracts end,
>>     >> law is obscured, yet the folks are in peace and accord, relying
>>     instead
>>     >> on their word and sociability.
>>     >>
>>     >> The "Tunc aut Nunquam" moment is also cast in unusual terms for
>>     Durrell:
>>     >>
>>     >> "Either everything will disintegrate, the Firm will begin to
>>     dissolve;
>>     >> or else nothing, Mr. Felix, absolutely nothing."
>>     >>
>>     >> The Zeno prophecy first appears on pages 231-2, and this Zeno
>>     is a Greek
>>     >> clerk who has visions (his vision is of the novel's ending and the
>>     >> destruction of coercion and obligation). However, I can't help
>>     but take
>>     >> the reference to Zeno (and can a Classicist on here correct me?!
>>     >> Bruce?) as potentially a gesture to Kropotkin's entry in the
>>     >> Encyclopaedia Britannics's 11th edition (same entry for
>>     Durrell's 14th
>>     >> edition? I know the 14th was based on the 11th edition):
>>     >>
>>     >> "The best exponent of anarchist philosophy in ancient Greece
>>     was Zeno
>>     >> [...] who distinctly opposed his conception of a free community
>>     without
>>     >> government to the state-utopia of Plato. He repudiated the
>>     omnipotence
>>     >> of the state, its intervention and regimentation, and
>>     proclaimed the
>>     >> sovereignty of the moral law of the individual -- remarking already
>>     >> that, while the necessary instinct of self-preservation leads
>>     man to
>>     >> egotism, nature has supplied a corrective to it by providing
>>     man with
>>     >> another instinct -- that of sociability. When men are
>>     reasonable enough
>>     >> to follow their natural instincts, they will unite across the
>>     frontiers
>>     >> and constitute the cosmos. They will have no need of law-courts or
>>     >> police, will have no temples and no public worship, and use no
>>     money --
>>     >> free gifts taking the place of the exchanges."
>>     >>
>>     >> I think Plutarch describes Zeno failing to kill the tyrant
>>     Demylus so
>>     >> that "with his own teeth bit off his tongue, he spit it in the
>>     tyrant?s
>>     >> face."
>>     >>
>>     >> I'm retracing some poetic networks that ran contrary to the Auden
>>     >> Generation, and most have an anarchist politics, so I may just
>>     have this
>>     >> in my head at the moment. Still, it seems like some anti-state or
>>     >> antiauthoritarian sentiments (which isn't so far from Durrell's
>>     open
>>     >> poetics) are present here.
>>     >>
>>     >> At any rate, those are the things that have been occupying my mind
>>     >> lately with /The Revolt of Aphrodite/... What say y'all?
>>     >>
>>     >> Best,
>>     >> James
>>     >>
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 13
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 15:04:17 -0800
>>     From: William Apt <billyapt at gmail.com <mailto:billyapt at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID:
>>     <AANLkTimAi-wXCg3KP9KCR5PAU2eNPAHkDkuQ8iHz8_ic at mail.gmail.com
>>     <mailto:AANLkTimAi-wXCg3KP9KCR5PAU2eNPAHkDkuQ8iHz8_ic at mail.gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>>
>>     Dear all:
>>
>>     I thought the book outstanding. How Prof. MacNiven was able to
>>     gather and
>>     synthesize so much material, and then put it into such an eloquent
>>     narrative
>>     is remarkable. Moreover, Prof. MacNiven honors his fiduciary
>>     obligations
>>     well: it is a most tactful book.
>>
>>     I had tried reading Bowker's bio but was put off by it. Perhaps
>>     because it
>>     was unauthorized, and Bowker was deprived of sources MacNiven had
>>     recourse
>>     to, there was way too much speculation-as-explanation for my
>>     taste. Can any
>>     one tell me how it essentially differs from MacNiven's book, and
>>     whether it
>>     is worthwhile?
>>
>>     Ultimately I find LD truly enigmatic. I have so many questions
>>     about why he
>>     was the way he was that, perhaps, cannot be clearly answered
>>     except to say
>>     that he was a genius, and genius is a mystery.
>>
>>     Again, thanks to everyone who was so helpful to me, including Prof.
>>     Godshalk, whom I forgot to thank yesterday.
>>
>>     --
>>     WILLIAM APT
>>     Attorney at Law
>>     7004 Bee Cave Rd, Bldg 1,
>>     Ste 205
>>     Austin TX 78746
>>     512/708-8300 <tel:+15127088300>
>>     512/708-8011 <tel:+15127088011> FAX
>>     -------------- next part --------------
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110128/41868c41/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 14
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 18:10:26 -0500 (EST)
>>     From: gkoger at mindspring.com <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID:
>>     <28880300.1296256226985.JavaMail.root at elwamui-polski.atl.sa.earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:28880300.1296256226985.JavaMail.root at elwamui-polski.atl.sa.earthlink.net>>
>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>>
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110128/4378b9f5/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 15
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 15:26:15 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th
>>     To: gifford at fdu.edu <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>, ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <19707863-1F2E-4B09-9EB6-EBF117CEF73B at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:19707863-1F2E-4B09-9EB6-EBF117CEF73B at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>>
>>     James,
>>
>>     Yes, the EB 11th section on Kropotkin's essay on "Anarchism" is as
>>     you quote it, except for the capitalization of "Anarchist,"
>>     "Utopia," and "Cosmos." Hopes this helps.
>>
>>
>>     Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 2:50 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>
>>     > Hi Bruce,
>>     >
>>     > Peter Kropotkin wrote the "Anarchism" entry to the 11th edition
>>     in 1905
>>     > (Wilde even quotes Kropotkin, without reference, in "The Soul of Man
>>     > Under Socialism").
>>     >
>>     > As I understand it, the 14th edition (which Durrell had on
>>     Corfu) was
>>     > largely a reversion to the 11th edition that added new entries
>>     and made
>>     > cuts to existing entries. If you have access, I'd appreciate it!! I
>>     > can get it online through my library, but it doesn't allow the
>>     > comparison between past editions.
>>     >
>>     > I believe the DSC Library has the 14th edition on its shelves too.
>>     >
>>     > Thanks!
>>     > James
>>     >
>>     > On 28/01/11 2:38 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     >> James,
>>     >>
>>     >> Tell me which entry in the 11th ed. of /EB,/ I'll check it for you.
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> Bruce
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> On Jan 28, 2011, at 1:21 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>     >>>
>>     >>>
>>     >>> The Zeno prophecy first appears on pages 231-2, and this Zeno
>>     is a Greek
>>     >>> clerk who has visions (his vision is of the novel's ending and the
>>     >>> destruction of coercion and obligation). However, I can't help
>>     but take
>>     >>> the reference to Zeno (and can a Classicist on here correct me?!
>>     >>> Bruce?) as potentially a gesture to Kropotkin's entry in the
>>     >>> Encyclopaedia Britannics's 11th edition (same entry for
>>     Durrell's 14th
>>     >>> edition? I know the 14th was based on the 11th edition):
>>     >>>
>>     >>> "The best exponent of anarchist philosophy in ancient Greece
>>     was Zeno
>>     >>> [...] who distinctly opposed his conception of a free
>>     community without
>>     >>> government to the state-utopia of Plato. He repudiated the
>>     omnipotence
>>     >>> of the state, its intervention and regimentation, and
>>     proclaimed the
>>     >>> sovereignty of the moral law of the individual -- remarking
>>     already
>>     >>> that, while the necessary instinct of self-preservation leads
>>     man to
>>     >>> egotism, nature has supplied a corrective to it by providing
>>     man with
>>     >>> another instinct -- that of sociability. When men are
>>     reasonable enough
>>     >>> to follow their natural instincts, they will unite across the
>>     frontiers
>>     >>> and constitute the cosmos. They will have no need of law-courts or
>>     >>> police, will have no temples and no public worship, and use no
>>     money --
>>     >>> free gifts taking the place of the exchanges."
>>     >>>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>
>>     -------------- next part --------------
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110128/1e2ac9a9/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 16
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 15:42:39 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D43546F.7070904 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D43546F.7070904 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>>
>>     Hi Bruce,
>>
>>     Alas, *I* don't have the 14th edition, just access to the 11th...
>>
>>     That said, a quick check in Google Books has Stephen Lukes
>>     remarking on
>>     Kropotkin's entry on Anarchism and Mutual Aid with a quotation that
>>     matches verbatim the 11th edition, but Lukes' citation is very clearly
>>     to the 1929-30 vol. 1 14th edition 9p. 873). I think that solves the
>>     mystery. Durrell's personal copy of the 14th edition would have
>>     carried
>>     at least a version of Kropotkin's 1905 entry for the 11th edition. I
>>     admire Lukes' work, so I'll trust it until I can check a 14h edition
>>     copy in the stacks.
>>
>>     But, would that Zeno reference have stuck, if Durrell had even
>>     read it,
>>     more than 20 years later? Dunno, but it does open a window of
>>     possibility.
>>
>>     Thanks for the help! And sorry to bore the rest of y'all -- any takers
>>     on the /Revolt/ suggestions?
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>     On 28/01/11 3:26 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     > James,
>>     >
>>     > Yes, the /EB/ 11th section on Kropotkin's essay on "Anarchism"
>>     is as you
>>     > quote it, except for the capitalization of "Anarchist,"
>>     "Utopia," and
>>     > "Cosmos." Hopes this helps.
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > Bruce
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > On Jan 28, 2011, at 2:50 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>     >
>>     >> Hi Bruce,
>>     >>
>>     >> Peter Kropotkin wrote the "Anarchism" entry to the 11th edition
>>     in 1905
>>     >> (Wilde even quotes Kropotkin, without reference, in "The Soul
>>     of Man
>>     >> Under Socialism").
>>     >>
>>     >> As I understand it, the 14th edition (which Durrell had on
>>     Corfu) was
>>     >> largely a reversion to the 11th edition that added new entries
>>     and made
>>     >> cuts to existing entries. If you have access, I'd appreciate it!! I
>>     >> can get it online through my library, but it doesn't allow the
>>     >> comparison between past editions.
>>     >>
>>     >> I believe the DSC Library has the 14th edition on its shelves too.
>>     >>
>>     >> Thanks!
>>     >> James
>>     >>
>>     >> On 28/01/11 2:38 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     >>> James,
>>     >>>
>>     >>> Tell me which entry in the 11th ed. of /EB,/ I'll check it for
>>     you.
>>     >>>
>>     >>>
>>     >>> Bruce
>>     >>>
>>     >>>
>>     >>>
>>     >>> On Jan 28, 2011, at 1:21 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>     >>>>
>>     >>>>
>>     >>>> The Zeno prophecy first appears on pages 231-2, and this Zeno
>>     is a Greek
>>     >>>> clerk who has visions (his vision is of the novel's ending
>>     and the
>>     >>>> destruction of coercion and obligation). However, I can't
>>     help but take
>>     >>>> the reference to Zeno (and can a Classicist on here correct me?!
>>     >>>> Bruce?) as potentially a gesture to Kropotkin's entry in the
>>     >>>> Encyclopaedia Britannics's 11th edition (same entry for
>>     Durrell's 14th
>>     >>>> edition? I know the 14th was based on the 11th edition):
>>     >>>>
>>     >>>> "The best exponent of anarchist philosophy in ancient Greece
>>     was Zeno
>>     >>>> [...] who distinctly opposed his conception of a free
>>     community without
>>     >>>> government to the state-utopia of Plato. He repudiated the
>>     omnipotence
>>     >>>> of the state, its intervention and regimentation, and
>>     proclaimed the
>>     >>>> sovereignty of the moral law of the individual -- remarking
>>     already
>>     >>>> that, while the necessary instinct of self-preservation leads
>>     man to
>>     >>>> egotism, nature has supplied a corrective to it by providing
>>     man with
>>     >>>> another instinct -- that of sociability. When men are
>>     reasonable enough
>>     >>>> to follow their natural instincts, they will unite across the
>>     frontiers
>>     >>>> and constitute the cosmos. They will have no need of
>>     law-courts or
>>     >>>> police, will have no temples and no public worship, and use
>>     no money --
>>     >>>> free gifts taking the place of the exchanges."
>>     >>>>
>>     >>>
>>     >>>
>>     >>>
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 17
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 10:44:40 +1100
>>     From: "Denise Tart & David Green" <dtart at bigpond.net.au
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     To: <ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     Message-ID: <9B585132B875420BB2F922657B0437AB at DenisePC>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>>
>>     William,
>>
>>     I have read Bowker's biography several times and can recommend it
>>     to you. yes, you are right that it has its problems and that
>>     Bowker does speculate at times, but it is a good contrast to tact
>>     of MacNiven, who as well as being a scholarly and authorised, is
>>     also a fan. Bowker, as his book title suggests, paints a darker
>>     picture of Lawrence particularly in relation to his treatment of
>>     women and his over fondness of alcohol; his creative madness being
>>     at times hard on people close to him. Read both a get a deeper
>>     picture - someone else out there is currently doing so and could
>>     perhaps ad to this commentary??
>>
>>     David Green
>>
>>
>>     From: William Apt
>>     Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 10:04 AM
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Subject: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>
>>
>>     Dear all:
>>
>>     I thought the book outstanding. How Prof. MacNiven was able to
>>     gather and synthesize so much material, and then put it into such
>>     an eloquent narrative is remarkable. Moreover, Prof. MacNiven
>>     honors his fiduciary obligations well: it is a most tactful book.
>>
>>     I had tried reading Bowker's bio but was put off by it. Perhaps
>>     because it was unauthorized, and Bowker was deprived of sources
>>     MacNiven had recourse to, there was way too much
>>     speculation-as-explanation for my taste. Can any one tell me how
>>     it essentially differs from MacNiven's book, and whether it is
>>     worthwhile?
>>
>>     Ultimately I find LD truly enigmatic. I have so many questions
>>     about why he was the way he was that, perhaps, cannot be clearly
>>     answered except to say that he was a genius, and genius is a mystery.
>>
>>     Again, thanks to everyone who was so helpful to me, including
>>     Prof. Godshalk, whom I forgot to thank yesterday.
>>
>>     --
>>     WILLIAM APT
>>     Attorney at Law
>>     7004 Bee Cave Rd, Bldg 1,
>>     Ste 205
>>     Austin TX 78746
>>     512/708-8300 <tel:+15127088300>
>>     512/708-8011 <tel:+15127088011> FAX
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     ILDS mailing list
>>     ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     -------------- next part --------------
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110129/ed6e4af7/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 18
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 16:01:26 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D4358D6.1090605 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D4358D6.1090605 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>>
>>     Hi David,
>>
>>     Michael Haag is writing the next biography. As for Bowker and
>>     MacNiven,
>>     it's worth noting that Bowker's biography has changes between the
>>     first
>>     and second editions. Nonetheless, in both he's darker and more
>>     speculative, though he did access some archives (like UVic's) that
>>     MacNiven did not -- his Malcolm Lowry biography is excellent, and it
>>     took him to some of the smaller places that MacNiven didn't reach.
>>
>>     Between the two, I prefer MacNiven's and trust it more, though
>>     it's not
>>     without slips here and there as well, which is inevitable in such
>>     a work.
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>     On 28/01/11 3:44 PM, Denise Tart & David Green wrote:
>>     > William,
>>     > I have read Bowker's biography several times and can recommend it to
>>     > you. yes, you are right that it has its problems and that Bowker
>>     does
>>     > speculate at times, but it is a good contrast to tact of
>>     MacNiven, who
>>     > as well as being a scholarly and authorised, is also a fan.
>>     Bowker, as
>>     > his book title suggests, paints a darker picture of Lawrence
>>     > particularly in relation to his treatment of women and his over
>>     fondness
>>     > of alcohol; his creative madness being at times hard on people
>>     close to
>>     > him. Read both a get a deeper picture - someone else out there is
>>     > currently doing so and could perhaps ad to this commentary??
>>     > David Green
>>     >
>>     > *From:* William Apt <mailto:billyapt at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:billyapt at gmail.com>>
>>     > *Sent:* Saturday, January 29, 2011 10:04 AM
>>     > *To:* ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     > *Subject:* [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     >
>>     > Dear all:
>>     > I thought the book outstanding. How Prof. MacNiven was able to
>>     gather
>>     > and synthesize so much material, and then put it into such an
>>     eloquent
>>     > narrative is remarkable. Moreover, Prof. MacNiven honors his
>>     fiduciary
>>     > obligations well: it is a most tactful book.
>>     > I had tried reading Bowker's bio but was put off by it. Perhaps
>>     because
>>     > it was unauthorized, and Bowker was deprived of sources MacNiven had
>>     > recourse to, there was way too much speculation-as-explanation
>>     for my
>>     > taste. Can any one tell me how it essentially differs from
>>     MacNiven's
>>     > book, and whether it is worthwhile?
>>     > Ultimately I find LD truly enigmatic. I have so many questions
>>     about why
>>     > he was the way he was that, perhaps, cannot be clearly answered
>>     except
>>     > to say that he was a genius, and genius is a mystery.
>>     > Again, thanks to everyone who was so helpful to me, including Prof.
>>     > Godshalk, whom I forgot to thank yesterday.
>>     >
>>     > --
>>     > WILLIAM APT
>>     > Attorney at Law
>>     > 7004 Bee Cave Rd, Bldg 1,
>>     > Ste 205
>>     > Austin TX 78746
>>     > 512/708-8300 <tel:+15127088300>
>>     > 512/708-8011 <tel:+15127088011> FAX
>>     >
>>     >
>>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 19
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 11:35:04 +1100
>>     From: "Denise Tart & David Green" <dtart at bigpond.net.au
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     To: <gifford at fdu.edu <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>>,
>>     <ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     Message-ID: <C2FA37827A8249D89246CCD5E44461E7 at DenisePC>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
>>     reply-type=original
>>
>>     James,
>>
>>     I am noting that I have the revised edition, much thumbed. Yes,
>>     Bowker is a
>>     sharp writer but writing a biography of any complex 'genius' would
>>     be hard
>>     task as I am sure Michael Haag has discovered, especially if you
>>     want to go
>>     beyond a chronicle into a analysis of motive, muse, the meaning of
>>     self in
>>     relation to the world. Things are bound to slip. That said I enjoy
>>     biographies as much or more sometimes than the subjects own writings.
>>
>>     Have been waiting for old Haag's biog for a while - in fact I'm
>>     getting that
>>     'when's it going to be wine o'clock feeling if'n you take my meaning?
>>
>>     David Whitewine
>>
>>     btw, am hoping to get sorted a decent look at Durrell's islomania;
>>     form to
>>     be determined.
>>
>>     --------------------------------------------------
>>     From: "James Gifford" <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 11:01 AM
>>     To: <ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>
>>     > Hi David,
>>     >
>>     > Michael Haag is writing the next biography. As for Bowker and
>>     MacNiven,
>>     > it's worth noting that Bowker's biography has changes between
>>     the first
>>     > and second editions. Nonetheless, in both he's darker and more
>>     > speculative, though he did access some archives (like UVic's) that
>>     > MacNiven did not -- his Malcolm Lowry biography is excellent, and it
>>     > took him to some of the smaller places that MacNiven didn't reach.
>>     >
>>     > Between the two, I prefer MacNiven's and trust it more, though
>>     it's not
>>     > without slips here and there as well, which is inevitable in
>>     such a work.
>>     >
>>     > Best,
>>     > James
>>     >
>>     > On 28/01/11 3:44 PM, Denise Tart & David Green wrote:
>>     >> William,
>>     >> I have read Bowker's biography several times and can recommend
>>     it to
>>     >> you. yes, you are right that it has its problems and that
>>     Bowker does
>>     >> speculate at times, but it is a good contrast to tact of
>>     MacNiven, who
>>     >> as well as being a scholarly and authorised, is also a fan.
>>     Bowker, as
>>     >> his book title suggests, paints a darker picture of Lawrence
>>     >> particularly in relation to his treatment of women and his over
>>     fondness
>>     >> of alcohol; his creative madness being at times hard on people
>>     close to
>>     >> him. Read both a get a deeper picture - someone else out there is
>>     >> currently doing so and could perhaps ad to this commentary??
>>     >> David Green
>>     >>
>>     >> *From:* William Apt <mailto:billyapt at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:billyapt at gmail.com>>
>>     >> *Sent:* Saturday, January 29, 2011 10:04 AM
>>     >> *To:* ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     >> *Subject:* [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     >>
>>     >> Dear all:
>>     >> I thought the book outstanding. How Prof. MacNiven was able to
>>     gather
>>     >> and synthesize so much material, and then put it into such an
>>     eloquent
>>     >> narrative is remarkable. Moreover, Prof. MacNiven honors his
>>     fiduciary
>>     >> obligations well: it is a most tactful book.
>>     >> I had tried reading Bowker's bio but was put off by it. Perhaps
>>     because
>>     >> it was unauthorized, and Bowker was deprived of sources
>>     MacNiven had
>>     >> recourse to, there was way too much speculation-as-explanation
>>     for my
>>     >> taste. Can any one tell me how it essentially differs from
>>     MacNiven's
>>     >> book, and whether it is worthwhile?
>>     >> Ultimately I find LD truly enigmatic. I have so many questions
>>     about why
>>     >> he was the way he was that, perhaps, cannot be clearly answered
>>     except
>>     >> to say that he was a genius, and genius is a mystery.
>>     >> Again, thanks to everyone who was so helpful to me, including Prof.
>>     >> Godshalk, whom I forgot to thank yesterday.
>>     >>
>>     >> --
>>     >> WILLIAM APT
>>     >> Attorney at Law
>>     >> 7004 Bee Cave Rd, Bldg 1,
>>     >> Ste 205
>>     >> Austin TX 78746
>>     >> 512/708-8300 <tel:+15127088300>
>>     >> 512/708-8011 <tel:+15127088011> FAX
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>     >>
>>     >> _______________________________________________
>>     >> ILDS mailing list
>>     >> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> _______________________________________________
>>     >> ILDS mailing list
>>     >> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 20
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 16:53:28 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] the longer response to Bruce
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D436508.1030104 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D436508.1030104 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>>
>>     Hi Bruce,
>>
>>     Here's a a more detailed response to your thoughtful response...
>>     To let
>>     others follow, I'll repeat your note that your comments are the
>>     numbered
>>     ones.
>>
>>     >> Well put, Bruce. I think there have been ongoing worries about
>>     >> "academic" and "lay" topics, and I for one don't think it's a real
>>     >> issue.
>>     >
>>     > 1. I do.
>>     >
>>     >> Academics like to talk about academic issues, lay readers the
>>     >> same, and then the vast majority vacillating in between.
>>     >
>>     > 2. The issue is not what people "like to talk" about, rather
>>     about what
>>     > they're willing to hear. I like to think I'm open to everything
>>     and do
>>     > not complain about someone else's hobby-horse, no matter how
>>     > energetically expressed.
>>
>>     Perhaps I should clarify what I mean. I don't think "lay" vs
>>     "academic"
>>     are a necessary conflict -- we all wander between both realms, so I
>>     consider it a disagreement based on misunderstandings rather than
>>     inextricable differences.
>>
>>     I'll admit that there are things with which I disagree, but in my
>>     moderator capacity, I wouldn't consider preventing any of them from
>>     being said if they don't cross a boundary of taste or decorum in a
>>     public forum. In my participant capacity, I'll jump in and disagree!
>>
>>     >> The Australians, evidently, like to talk about wine...
>>     >
>>     > 3. And so do the French, Italians, and Americans. And so did
>>     Lawrence
>>     > Durrell, who became the model for such talk about wine and its
>>     > pleasures. For a view of Durrellians at the wine table, see p. 8
>>     of the
>>     > ILDS /Herald,/ 15 May 2010, and then read the captions to the
>>     photos.
>>
>>     I believe I've been seen consuming the waters of life on many an
>>     occasion... I just didn't want David to feel left out and perhaps
>>     should have noted to joke overtly. ;)
>>
>>     >> Regardless of our various and diverse interests, some of us
>>     will and
>>     >> won't be interested in each others topics, but that's why the
>>     list is an
>>     >> open forum in which people can dabble as they wish. The variety of
>>     >> interests is a good thing, not a bad, and lurkers are welcome too.
>>     >> Folks are free to participate in whatever way suits them best.
>>     >
>>     > 4. A slightly disingenuous characterization. Seems to me the
>>     moderators
>>     > are making too much effort to accommodate, as someone else put
>>     it, "the
>>     > lowest common denominator." I enjoy all kinds of contributions and
>>     > discussions. But all issues should be on the table, not simply those
>>     > that put old LD in a good light and make him palpable to the
>>     masses. And
>>     > if that means getting into the nitty-gritty of scholarship and
>>     literary
>>     > analysis, as I believe Bill Godshalk was on the verge of doing, then
>>     > let's hear it and let's discuss it. I find it very ironic that I, a
>>     > non-academic, should be the one defending the Academy and its
>>     practices.
>>
>>     I think this is more a matter of balancing between dissemination and
>>     keeping discussion growing... As a moderator, that's always going
>>     to be
>>     a tough call -- we've asked people to move discussions along or to
>>     consider letting some disagreements lie, but I hope we've not
>>     prevented
>>     open discourse.
>>
>>     It's probably a matter of self-censorship by academics when a feeling
>>     emerges that folks aren't interested in the academic work -- by
>>     the same
>>     token, if Bill's working that up into an article, he may have cut the
>>     cord to the internet once he struck gold. I've done that on a few
>>     occasions to avoid spoiling the later surprise in print (or at
>>     least my
>>     hubris imagines the "surprise" of a reader...).
>>
>>     The same thing goes in the other direction when "lay" readers feel shy
>>     asking questions on commenting for fear of being "corrected" or not
>>     fitting in. I'd hope they'd jump into the fray -- I personally welcome
>>     such participants, even if I don't have a lot to offer them.
>>
>>     >>> Nor do I see it as a cheering section for Lawrence
>>     >>> Durrell's life and work.
>>     >>
>>     >> My academic hat tells me to say "cheering" is beside the point,
>>     >
>>     > 5. No. Entirely the point. See no. 4.
>>
>>     I think I see what you mean. I don't agree, but I understand. I'm
>>     certainly not trying to stop anyone from bringing uncomfortable
>>     facts to
>>     light -- I disagree with your personal interpretation of them, and to
>>     some degree, we're just going to have to live with our disagreements
>>     there since it's not likely we'll move forward by repeating them.
>>
>>     That said, you shouldn't feel like you can't give air to them.
>>     Plagiarism, sexism, alcoholism, incest, and violence are probably the
>>     points of contention, and I'd imagine we'll find a range of
>>     perspectives
>>     on those here as ways of interpreting Durrell's works. My hunch is
>>     that
>>     we'd be in agreement on all of those issues but one: plagiarism.
>>     As for
>>     incest, I think it's an example of where biographical speculation
>>     leads
>>     to false results, as Mary Hamer's book on the topic demonstrates.
>>
>>     An apologia for an author leads to no good and a blurred vision.
>>     Durrell was certainly an alcoholic with sexist and violent parts
>>     of his
>>     personality, though to some degree feminist and pacifist tendencies as
>>     well. We simply disagree on how to look at creative texts, and I deal
>>     with plagiarism in my administrative capacity, for which no one has
>>     accused me of being too easy... I simply want to note that reasonable
>>     disagreement is possible on that. As for incest, I think accusations
>>     against Durrell in that regard reflect a search for attention -- shock
>>     journalism. Hamer's an instance of how badly that can go.
>>
>>     >> but I suspect some would enjoy a cheer now and again (or the
>>     >> opposite), and I
>>     >> don't think they should be silenced. I just won't provide the
>>     pom poms.
>>     >
>>     > 6. As you're doing now, it would be nice to have the moderators
>>     > occasionally provide reasoned opinions, in addition to quips and
>>     > citations. Charles used to do this well. No longer, sadly.
>>
>>     Charles is a mere mortal, and I think his recent find is keeping
>>     on the
>>     road quite a bit at present. I'll do my best, such as it is...
>>
>>     >> I might also add, a good deal of answers are sent off-list, which I
>>     >> believe has been the case for several recent academic queries.
>>     >
>>     > 7. Which is a very big mistake. Why aren't the answers to academic
>>     > queries made public? I'd like to see them.
>>
>>     I mean things such as locations of books, tips for local resources,
>>     etc... I make a point of putting things on the list that have any
>>     chance of being of public interest.
>>
>>     > 8. I praise the moderators for their time and effort. No irony here.
>>
>>     Shucks, Bruce, I'm blushing... Charles, though, is the Boxer to our
>>     animal farm. I suspect I'm more of a stubborn mule.
>>
>>     > Or, perhaps I can stir the pot by going after Bruce's flagrantly
>>     dangled
>>     > hook & bait: [that's me]
>>     >
>>     >> Like Chatwin and de Man, Durrell had a few
>>     >> things to expunge or expiate. [Bruce]
>>     >
>>     > I might look sideways at Cleanth Brooks from time to time, but
>>     Bruce, I
>>     > thought you had a good ol' New Criticism vein (or artery) running in
>>     > you. Surely this falls foul of some kind of intentional fallacy or
>>     > conversation with dead people. Barthes might ask about the
>>     reader too...
>>     >
>>     > 9. Name-dropping is not an argument, James. Bruce Chatwin and
>>     Paul de
>>     > Man share similarities with Lawrence Durrell. Chatwin had a hard
>>     time
>>     > distinguishing fact from fiction, and de Man covered up some sordid
>>     > behavior. Both topics have been discussed on this List and in
>>     > considerable detail.
>>
>>     I'll agree with this. Chatwin had good reasons for failing to make
>>     that
>>     distinction toward the end, and Durrell admitted repeatedly to mainly
>>     living in his mind rather than the world outside. Paul de Man had
>>     rather darker things to cover up though... I think that's where I
>>     hesitate. Durrell certainly had things to hide and a life of the
>>     imagination, but the de Man approach would go back to the incest
>>     topic,
>>     which I think is a red herring in Durrell's case. He certainly was not
>>     saint, but even without redeeming him, I'd not be as jaded as de Man's
>>     Nazi ties would suggest.
>>
>>     Would a better comparison be Chatwin and Graham Greene or Iris
>>     Murdoch.
>>     Neither of the last two were saints, but neither had the same kind of
>>     skeletons in the closet as de Man. Perhaps a tibia or femur or
>>     two, but
>>     not the legion de Man or Heidegger might command.
>>
>>     > Isn't some of the brilliance of LD's prose, and perhaps most of
>>     all the
>>     > poetry, the fact that it is gorgeously ambiguous in the sense of
>>     Keats'
>>     > Negative Capability?
>>     >
>>     > 10. Keats's "Negative Capability" is hard to understand.
>>
>>     I'm not trying to minimize Keats' complexities. They're well known.
>>     What I mean is that an easy bridge between author and text is always
>>     going to be fraught with perils. We can't have that brilliant
>>     complexity *and* and easy path back to the author... Much like Keats'
>>     masks.
>>
>>     > Robert Duncan makes nice work of Durrell's
>>     > ambiguous objects in Greek poems like "Carol on Corfu" in his
>>     "Ark for
>>     > Lawrence Durrell," which strikes me as having a bit of the bite
>>     you're
>>     > looking for without falling into the myopia of clear vision...
>>     >
>>     > 11. I'd like to learn more about "the myopia of clear vision."
>>
>>     Seeing something too clearly usually tells me I'm finding what I
>>     set out
>>     to find rather than what's really there... My dissertation looked at
>>     instances of this in Durrell and Miller -- critics have often
>>     described
>>     events in both authors' works that don't actually exist. Sometimes the
>>     gaps are so provocative that we fill them in and fail to notice where
>>     the contents came from -- I try to keep myself humble in that area
>>     (trust me, it's hard! Hubris away!). When I think I've finally
>>     achieved a clear vision of something I begin to suspect that I'm being
>>     myopic about the unresolvable ambiguities (Empson's 7th type) that are
>>     invariably present. My certainly blinds me to the rich
>>     uncertainties...
>>
>>     > If I think I've puzzled out what a poet really *meant*, then I
>>     second guess
>>     > myself and wonder if my certainty is blinding me to the gloriously
>>     > ambiguous that doesn't actually have a non-readerly resolution.
>>     >
>>     > 12. Hard to discuss this without specifics [...] You're emphasizing
>>     > readers over authors, as Barthes famously spoke of the "death of the
>>     > author," along with the impossibility to recover authorial
>>     intentions,
>>     > as Bill likes to stress. All this I largely disagree with, for
>>     the most
>>     > part. I see a text as mainly under the control of its author ?
>>     but not
>>     > everything in it. Authors don't always know what they're doing.
>>     Frank
>>     > Kermode makes this point well in "Secrets and Narrative
>>     Sequence" (1980).
>>
>>     Precisely, and I suppose we're just going to disagree. Much of it is a
>>     matter of polemics and tendencies. When I see a cheque, I don't
>>     imagine
>>     the kind of death of the author that Barthes (who got royalties!)
>>     suggests. By the same token, when I see Darley I don't see Lawrence
>>     Durrell. I try to be very tentative when I talk of biographical
>>     matters, often restricting myself to tying two texts together,
>>     contextualizing sources or language, or trying to draw out an
>>     overlooked
>>     interpretive possibility. Otherwise, I tend to leave interpretive
>>     matters to the reader rather than the writer. The writer sold me the
>>     book, and now I'll do with it just as I please... ;)
>>
>>     But there are reasonable reasons to disagree here, perhaps most
>>     often to
>>     keep each other to reasonable degrees of difference.
>>
>>     > I'm also curious why "expiate" rather than "express" or "deal
>>     with"? Is
>>     > there a Catholic vein too, my eucharistic friend?
>>     >
>>     > 13. There is a "Catholic vein" to my thought, being a lapsed
>>     Catholic.
>>     > If you accept the de Man analogy (which I expect you do not), then
>>     > "expiate" is exactly the right word.
>>
>>     Don't worry, Bruce, they seem get people back in the end... Hence
>>     "lapsed" rather than "lost"... ;)
>>
>>     You're right, I don't accept the de Man analogy, but I do see what you
>>     mean by expiate. Is there a reasonable middle ground between de
>>     Man and
>>     Mother Theresa? I'm sure Durrell had things to expiate, but I don't
>>     think they were on the same order as de Man. Does that make sense?
>>     Moreover, I'm not always convinced that retracing that expiation will
>>     lead to the author, ? la Eliot's catalyst in "Tradition and the
>>     Individual Talent," though he was trying to expiate some sins and hide
>>     some skeletons as well...
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 21
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 17:40:12 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D436FFC.1080302 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D436FFC.1080302 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>>
>>     As always, Ilyas, you have a keen eye and generous description of the
>>     things it spies.
>>
>>     All apologies for my provincially dull skirmishes with Bruce, but at
>>     least we're keeping our blades dull as well. Hopefully this recent
>>     jump
>>     in activity on the list will return us to the "vibrant balance of the
>>     scholarly, academic, casual and amateur enthusiast."
>>
>>     As for Charles,
>>
>>     > Bill, is he not in chicago ? Buried in the archive?
>>     > Last I heard he was mumbling something about blacke
>>     > booke
>>
>>     I thought he was still in Zagreb chasing the Justine ts. I think I'll
>>     have to try his cell...
>>
>>     Best,
>>     James
>>
>>     On 26/01/11 2:14 AM, Ilyas Khan wrote:
>>     > Ken,
>>     >
>>     > You make the key point in my view. I am active (and find
>>     tremendously
>>     > rewarding) my participation as ?poster? and ?lurker? on a number of
>>     > other such venues, and the key difference is that despite much hand
>>     > wringing on this listserv, there is an incredible tendency towards
>>     > clique-ishness, made all the more provincially dull by the
>>     continuation
>>     > of long standing personal skirmishes that the vast majority of
>>     us do not
>>     > understand or appreciate.
>>     >
>>     > My own attitude has been, therefore, to focus on two things.
>>     Firstly, my
>>     > own love of LD means that I usually find nuggets here, but I
>>     also have
>>     > drifted towards a personal reply instead of a reply to the forum
>>     as a
>>     > whole. Secondly, when the usual small clique start squabbling or
>>     cannot
>>     > see the impact of their language on others, I simply ignore them and
>>     > enjoy the underlying conversation from which I have learnt so
>>     much. At
>>     > times people such as James and Charles have tried to bring the
>>     > conversation back to the ?relevant?, but even they, I think,
>>     sometimes
>>     > tire of the same old repetition.
>>     >
>>     > There is a message in reply to David?s post that also raises the
>>     issue
>>     > of how some academics have been teased off this listserv from
>>     posting
>>     > stuff that is too academic. I agree that if other venues can
>>     maintain a
>>     > vibrant balance of the scholarly, academic, casual and amateur
>>     > enthusiast, then so can we.
>>     >
>>     > On that basis therefore, David, I for one will try to become more
>>     > active. I value this little part of my life, and unless we all
>>     step upto
>>     > the plate, we have only ourselves to blame. Having made my
>>     points above,
>>     > I am hoping I can become one of the non-scholarly or non-academic
>>     > participants who has an opinion and a constructive point of view.
>>     >
>>     > Thanks
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > On 26/01/2011 00:29, "Ken Gammage" <Ken.Gammage at directed.com
>>     <mailto:Ken.Gammage at directed.com>> wrote:
>>     >
>>     > Very good David. A provocative post that should wake up the
>>     > listserv! However, I?m not sure how well your example supports your
>>     > argument. Rony sent a second post about Otto Rank that resulted in
>>     > detailed and I?m sure very helpful responses from Charles Sligh and
>>     > James Gifford. I have been a flagrant lurker for the past several
>>     > years, enjoying the insightful and often beautiful writing by many
>>     > thoughtful posters about Durrell, often responding directly and
>>     > privately to the poster without necessarily having the courage to
>>     > publicly offer my own sometimes contrary opinions (e.g. pro-The
>>     > Greek Islands, where others find this coffee table book motivated
>>     > strictly by lucre.)
>>     > You see ? that?s why I seldom post. I can almost sense the artillery
>>     > cranking into place, preparing a fusillade of disparagement at my
>>     > poor taste in Island books! (I still like Prospero the best.) Please
>>     > see my kind words about Durrell on the last page of my Italy
>>     > website: www.travelogorrhea.com <http://www.travelogorrhea.com/>
>>     <http://www.travelogorrhea.com <http://www.travelogorrhea.com/>>
>>     >
>>     > Viva Durrell!
>>     >
>>     > Kennedy Gammage
>>     > ken.gammage at directed.com <mailto:ken.gammage at directed.com>
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > *From:* ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > [mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>] *On Behalf Of *Denise Tart &
>>     > David Green
>>     > *Sent:* Tuesday, January 25, 2011 3:30 PM
>>     > *To:* Durrel; DURRELL at LISTSERV.CC.UCF.EDU
>>     <mailto:DURRELL at LISTSERV.CC.UCF.EDU>
>>     > *Subject:* [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > It has come to my notice and the notice of one or two other
>>     > contributors to this list that things have gone rather quiet in
>>     > Durrell land over the last few weeks, months even, leaving me to
>>     > ponder whatever happened to the lively debates and discussions of
>>     > Durrell and his works?
>>     > There seems to be no interest in keeping any kind of serious
>>     > discussion going. Some large and well researched postings by me and
>>     > some others, intended to stimulate discussion have disappeared
>>     > without a trace. The general run of recent postings, few and far
>>     > between, appear restricted to scholarly minutia or references to
>>     > academic journals.
>>     >
>>     > There was almost no response to young Israeli student, Rony
>>     > Alfandary, who appeared to be seeking some encouragement so that she
>>     > can do her bit to promote LD in the world of scholarship. Unless
>>     > some communication occurred off line, Bruce Redwine was the only
>>     > member to publicly respond.
>>     >
>>     > Has there been a shift in policy re the ILDS List-Serve. Is it no
>>     > longer a forum for discussion, since that can lead to controversy
>>     > about M. Durrell's reputation? Currently there appears to be an
>>     > aloofness on the part of certain contributors and a disinterest in
>>     > endorsing anything substantive. Is the List now a place for the
>>     > cognoscenti to say nice things to one another or merely to refer to
>>     > items of Durrell scholarship, worthy as these things is in their own
>>     > right?
>>     >
>>     > Where are all the so called lurkers? Where are all the people who
>>     > used to pitch in have a say? Is the horse suffering from a terminal
>>     > illness or is it just tired and resting up, unwilling at the moment
>>     > to enter the forum of fiery debate about the life and works of the
>>     > Hero of Kalamni, Bellapaix, Alexandria etc etc?
>>     >
>>     > Whatever happened to the spirit of L. Pursewarden, who wrote,
>>     > "Protestant purely in the sense that I protest!"
>>     >
>>     > Yours, somewhat puzzled,
>>     >
>>     > David Green
>>     >
>>     > 16 William Street
>>     > Marrickville NSW 2204
>>     > Australia
>>     >
>>     > This email may contain confidential and/or privileged
>>     > information. It is intended only for the person or persons to
>>     > whom it is addressed. Any unauthorized review, use, or
>>     > distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended
>>     > recipient, please contact the sender by reply email or
>>     > telephone and destroy all copies of the original message.
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 22
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 20:00:12 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     To: Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>,
>>     ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <A8D78227-2D09-4571-9D0B-3F34A766FDA8 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:A8D78227-2D09-4571-9D0B-3F34A766FDA8 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>>
>>     I haven't read MacNiven in toto but agree with David's take on
>>     Bowker. I am not convinced, however, with Bowker's attempt to
>>     rationalize Durrell's "creative madness," especially with respect
>>     to his occasional treatment of his wives, sometimes brutally.
>>
>>
>>     BR
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 3:44 PM, Denise Tart & David Green wrote:
>>
>>     > William,
>>     >
>>     > I have read Bowker's biography several times and can recommend
>>     it to you. yes, you are right that it has its problems and that
>>     Bowker does speculate at times, but it is a good contrast to tact
>>     of MacNiven, who as well as being a scholarly and authorised, is
>>     also a fan. Bowker, as his book title suggests, paints a darker
>>     picture of Lawrence particularly in relation to his treatment of
>>     women and his over fondness of alcohol; his creative madness being
>>     at times hard on people close to him. Read both a get a deeper
>>     picture - someone else out there is currently doing so and could
>>     perhaps ad to this commentary??
>>     >
>>     > David Green
>>     >
>>     > From: William Apt
>>     > Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 10:04 AM
>>     > To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > Subject: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     >
>>     > Dear all:
>>     >
>>     > I thought the book outstanding. How Prof. MacNiven was able to
>>     gather and synthesize so much material, and then put it into such
>>     an eloquent narrative is remarkable. Moreover, Prof. MacNiven
>>     honors his fiduciary obligations well: it is a most tactful book.
>>     >
>>     > I had tried reading Bowker's bio but was put off by it. Perhaps
>>     because it was unauthorized, and Bowker was deprived of sources
>>     MacNiven had recourse to, there was way too much
>>     speculation-as-explanation for my taste. Can any one tell me how
>>     it essentially differs from MacNiven's book, and whether it is
>>     worthwhile?
>>     >
>>     > Ultimately I find LD truly enigmatic. I have so many questions
>>     about why he was the way he was that, perhaps, cannot be clearly
>>     answered except to say that he was a genius, and genius is a mystery.
>>     >
>>     > Again, thanks to everyone who was so helpful to me, including
>>     Prof. Godshalk, whom I forgot to thank yesterday.
>>     >
>>     > --
>>     > WILLIAM APT
>>     > Attorney at Law
>>     > 7004 Bee Cave Rd, Bldg 1,
>>     > Ste 205
>>     > Austin TX 78746
>>     > 512/708-8300 <tel:+15127088300>
>>     > 512/708-8011 <tel:+15127088011> FAX
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
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>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 23
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 20:04:14 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: gifford at fdu.edu <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>, ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <4850D6A6-F241-4278-BAD7-D7892AD32434 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:4850D6A6-F241-4278-BAD7-D7892AD32434 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>>
>>     The "Justine ts?" The Justine type script? Whereas Charles is, I
>>     wish him well.
>>
>>
>>     BR
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 5:40 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>
>>     > As for Charles,
>>     >
>>     >> Bill, is he not in chicago ? Buried in the archive?
>>     >> Last I heard he was mumbling something about blacke
>>     >> booke
>>     >
>>     > I thought he was still in Zagreb chasing the Justine ts. I think
>>     I'll
>>     > have to try his cell...
>>     >
>>     > Best,
>>     > James
>>     >
>>
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>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 24
>>     Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 20:20:47 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] MacNiven Bio
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <DC627DEB-F4C4-4C33-851E-3E87934F57AF at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:DC627DEB-F4C4-4C33-851E-3E87934F57AF at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>>
>>     Bill,
>>
>>     Any attempt to write a biography of Lawrence Durrell is a
>>     mind-boggling enterprise, both in terms of the complexity of the
>>     man himself and the huge amount of material required to absorb and
>>     analyze. He was definitely a genius but also a very flawed one,
>>     which is probably the way we want our geniuses to be. It was a
>>     pleasure to offer you the little assistance I could.
>>
>>
>>     Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 3:04 PM, William Apt wrote:
>>
>>     > Dear all:
>>     >
>>     > I thought the book outstanding. How Prof. MacNiven was able to
>>     gather and synthesize so much material, and then put it into such
>>     an eloquent narrative is remarkable. Moreover, Prof. MacNiven
>>     honors his fiduciary obligations well: it is a most tactful book.
>>     >
>>     > I had tried reading Bowker's bio but was put off by it. Perhaps
>>     because it was unauthorized, and Bowker was deprived of sources
>>     MacNiven had recourse to, there was way too much
>>     speculation-as-explanation for my taste. Can any one tell me how
>>     it essentially differs from MacNiven's book, and whether it is
>>     worthwhile?
>>     >
>>     > Ultimately I find LD truly enigmatic. I have so many questions
>>     about why he was the way he was that, perhaps, cannot be clearly
>>     answered except to say that he was a genius, and genius is a mystery.
>>     >
>>     > Again, thanks to everyone who was so helpful to me, including
>>     Prof. Godshalk, whom I forgot to thank yesterday.
>>     >
>>     > --
>>     > WILLIAM APT
>>     > Attorney at Law
>>     > 7004 Bee Cave Rd, Bldg 1,
>>     > Ste 205
>>     > Austin TX 78746
>>     > 512/708-8300 <tel:+15127088300>
>>     > 512/708-8011 <tel:+15127088011> FAX
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 25
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 00:03:39 -0800 (PST)
>>     From: Richard Pine <rpinecorfu at yahoo.com
>>     <mailto:rpinecorfu at yahoo.com>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] Names
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <192927.66531.qm at web65817.mail.ac4.yahoo.com
>>     <mailto:192927.66531.qm at web65817.mail.ac4.yahoo.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>>
>>     Wasn't me! RP
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     ________________________________
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     To: Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>; ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Sent: Fri, January 28, 2011 11:20:13 PM
>>     Subject: [ilds] Names
>>
>>     Pursewarden. ?Sometime ago, R. Pine, I believe, pointed out that
>>     Ludwig's
>>     surname was a pun or allusion to the scrotum. ?Or maybe
>>     I?just?have a dirty
>>     mind. ?Bill Godshalk can confirm this, either way. ?The OED,
>>     however, cites
>>     "scrotum" as a Renaissance meaning of purse. ?Cf. Iago's "Who
>>     steals my purse
>>     steals trash," where "purse," given Iago's lewd mind, probably
>>     refers to more
>>     than coins.
>>
>>
>>     Mountolive. ?New Testament "Mount of Olives," associated with
>>     Christ's Passion
>>     and possibly the Garden of Gethsemane? ?Not clear how this applies
>>     to Sir David,
>>     unless you want to argue that in the Quartet the ambassador has
>>     his own Passion
>>     or?passions?to deal with. ?This may be Durrell being whimsical and
>>     irreverent.
>>     ?Still, a good name.
>>
>>
>>     Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 28, 2011, at 12:21 PM, Denise Tart & David Green wrote:
>>
>>     Meta,
>>     >?
>>     >thanks for news about the Villa Cleobolus, sad though it is. I
>>     have been able to
>>     >find Larry's other houses on Google Earth, but not the one in Rhodes.
>>     >insidently, a Greek friend of mine reckons that Rhodes is the
>>     most beautiful
>>     >island in the world which certainly comes through in the Marine
>>     Venus.
>>     >?
>>     >To the names in Dark Labyrinth, yes the names imply the characters
>>     >?
>>     >Graecen - the graceful and mannered lord.
>>     >Campion - Champion, the hero of the piece - the shit stirring
>>     artist rebel type
>>     >Fearmax - the enigmatic, withdrawn magician (maximum fear)
>>     >The Truman's - true, honest ordinary people who achieve a
>>     mountain utopia
>>     >(Durrell's hearkening back to his Indian Himalayan experiences)
>>     >?
>>     >etc etc
>>     >?
>>     >we recall in 18th century? English Lit characters like Squire
>>     Booby (a booby
>>     >being an ignorant boor) or squire Weston, he from the west
>>     country, a land of
>>     >rowdy, drunken cider drinkers, the lord be good to them.
>>     >?
>>     >I also wonder about Quartet characters - Pursewarden for example
>>     (money guard)
>>     >or Mountolive - who was Olive???
>>     >?
>>     >David Green
>>     >Terra Australis Incognito
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >From:?Meta Cerar
>>     >Sent:?Friday, January 28, 2011 9:58 PM
>>     >To:?ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >Subject:?Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >Actually there are more ?18th century? names in the Dark
>>     Labyrinth, like TRUMAN
>>     >for example. What an appropriate name for someone who ends up on
>>     the Roof of the
>>     >World, which I agree is one of the most magnificent chapters in
>>     Durrell's entire
>>     >opus, as one of the list members wrote recently.
>>     >?
>>     >If anyone on the list knows of an article concerning the Cefalu
>>     or Dark
>>     >Labyrinth ?names, I would be greatly interested. I am currently
>>     translating Dark
>>     >Labyrinth into Slovenian ? to be published at the 100th
>>     anniversary of his birth
>>     >(February 2012) ? and would love to include this symbolism into
>>     the preface of
>>     >the book.
>>     >?
>>     >I would also be grateful for any information on reviews or
>>     articles on this
>>     >particular book, which I greatly enjoy working on although L.D.
>>     dismissed it as
>>     >a potboiler. I think there was an article in Deus Loci about Otto
>>     Rank's
>>     >influence on D.L. If anyone happens to be familiar with it,
>>     please let me know
>>     >if it's worth reading.
>>     >?
>>     >BTW, I loved the photos from Bellapais. What a great location for
>>     a future
>>     >Durrell conference! I followed the Durrell trail throughout the
>>     Meditterranean
>>     >but haven't been to Cyprus yet. The Villa Cleobolus and the ?Tree
>>     of idleness?
>>     >in the old moslem graveyard in Rhodes are sadly neglected to my great
>>     >disappointment.
>>     >?
>>     >Looking forward to further commentaries on Dark Labyrinth,
>>     >?
>>     >Meta Cerar,
>>     >Slovenia
>>     >?
>>     >
>>     ________________________________
>>
>>     >From:?ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca?[mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca]?On
>>     <http://ilds-bounces@lists.uvic.ca/?[mailto:ilds-bounces@lists.uvic.ca]?On>
>>     Behalf
>>     >Of?Bruce Redwine
>>     >Sent:?Thursday, January 27, 2011 10:43 PM
>>     >To:?Denise Tart & David Green;?ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >Subject:?Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >?
>>     >Someone undoubtedly already has published an article on names in
>>     Cefalu, indeed
>>     >throughout Durrell's fiction. ?My guess is that LD sometimes
>>     chose them as
>>     >Shakespeare did his low-life characters: ? Mistress Quickly, Doll
>>     Tearsheet,
>>     >Pistol, etc. ?People are their names. ?Doesn't Fearmax die of fright?
>>     >?
>>     >?
>>     >Bruce
>>     >
>>     >Sent from my iPhone
>>     >
>>     >On Jan 27, 2011, at 11:59 AM, "Denise Tart & David Green"
>>     <dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>
>>     >wrote:
>>     >I especially recommend the?early chapter in Tunc describing
>>     Caradoc's drunken
>>     >speech in front of the Parthenon.?Grove
>>     >>
>>     >>It is probably fitting that I make a detailed literary analysis
>>     of Caradoc's
>>     >>speech - already seeing Durrell's juxtaposition of northern
>>     Celtic Caradoc and
>>     >>the? souther classical Parthenon.
>>     >>?
>>     >>btw, has anyone studied Durrell's names? I was very intrigued
>>     by?them when
>>     >>reading Dark Labyrinth recently; Fearmax, Graecen - there
>>     something 18th century
>>     >>about it.
>>     >>?
>>     >>David
>>     >>?
>>     >>?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     -------------- next part --------------
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>>     URL:
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>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 26
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 00:18:32 -0800 (PST)
>>     From: Richard Pine <rpinecorfu at yahoo.com
>>     <mailto:rpinecorfu at yahoo.com>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th
>>     To: gifford at fdu.edu <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>, ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <691071.26582.qm at web65816.mail.ac4.yahoo.com
>>     <mailto:691071.26582.qm at web65816.mail.ac4.yahoo.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>>
>>     The articles in EB specifically marked by LD are:
>>
>>     Abnormal Psychology
>>     Abraxas
>>     Almanac
>>     Archimedes
>>     Arrhenius
>>     Asia
>>     Astrology
>>     Astronomy
>>     Calendar
>>     (Central America - May)
>>     (Chronology - Maya)
>>     Circle
>>     Comparative Ethics
>>     Confucius
>>     Cone
>>     Constellation
>>     Cosmogony
>>     Egypt
>>     Equation of Time
>>     Geodesy
>>     Geometry (and Line Geometry)
>>     Indian Philosophy
>>     Infinity
>>     Lhasa
>>     Limit
>>     Mayan Calendar
>>     Mayan Culture
>>     Menstruation
>>     Nashe
>>     Number & Numerals
>>     Observatory
>>     Palmistry
>>     Ptolemy
>>     Serpents
>>     Sphere
>>     Stoics
>>     Zero
>>     Tibet
>>     Tides
>>     Time
>>
>>
>>
>>     ----- Original Message ----
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Sent: Sat, January 29, 2011 12:50:12 AM
>>     Subject: [ilds] Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th
>>
>>     Hi Bruce,
>>
>>     Peter Kropotkin wrote the "Anarchism" entry to the 11th edition in
>>     1905
>>     (Wilde even quotes Kropotkin, without reference, in "The Soul of Man
>>     Under Socialism").
>>
>>     As I understand it, the 14th edition (which Durrell had on Corfu) was
>>     largely a reversion to the 11th edition that added new entries and
>>     made
>>     cuts to existing entries.? If you have access, I'd appreciate it!!? I
>>     can get it online through my library, but it doesn't allow the
>>     comparison between past editions.
>>
>>     I believe the DSC Library has the 14th edition on its shelves too.
>>
>>     Thanks!
>>     James
>>
>>     On 28/01/11 2:38 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     > James,
>>     >
>>     > Tell me which entry in the 11th ed. of /EB,/ I'll check it for you.
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > Bruce
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > On Jan 28, 2011, at 1:21 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>     >
>>     >> On 27/01/11 6:57 AM, gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>
>>     >> <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>>
>>     wrote:
>>     >>> And for those who haven't read Tunc and Nunquam, get busy!
>>     They're the
>>     >>> most consistently underrated of Durrell's novels and deserve more
>>     >>> attention. I'm not qualified to undertake a chapter-by-chapter
>>     analysis
>>     >>> of them, but perhaps someone else could this summer.
>>     >>
>>     >> Do I sense another reading group coming on? I'd enjoy that, and
>>     Tunc
>>     >> and Nunquam have been favourites of mine. Great suggestion, Grove!
>>     >> Let's plan for it this summer.
>>     >>
>>     >> I'm of the (perhaps heretical) opinion that these are more
>>     political
>>     >> works than they let on, and that they show much about Durrell's
>>     1930s
>>     >> and 40s activities that can otherwise be overlooked.
>>     >>
>>     >> Caradoc's speech is grand, but I'm always struck by the
>>     inexplicable
>>     >> ending to /Nunquam/... I can't help but think of Durrell's
>>     publications
>>     >> in the anarchist press (NOW, New Road, Experimental Review, the New
>>     >> Apocalypse books, and so forth) and the ease with which an
>>     >> antiauthoritarian interpretation of his poetics can be made. Add to
>>     >> that mix the language of /Nunquam/'s last two pages 282-283 (law,
>>     >> authority, command, contractual obligation, and the fall of the
>>     state):
>>     >>
>>     >> "which satisfied the law."
>>     >>
>>     >> "the prophecy of Zeno has been occupying me, preoccupying me
>>     very much.
>>     >> Indeed I now feel it less as a prophecy than as a sort of command,
>>     >> from myself to myself"
>>     >>
>>     >> "People will be afraid to take advantage of the fact that they
>>     have no
>>     >> contractual obligations."
>>     >>
>>     >> "we have been dancing, dancing in complete happiness and
>>     accord.... even
>>     >> though Rome burns."
>>     >>
>>     >> I may be just spotting things I'm looking for in other 1930s
>>     writers at
>>     >> the moment (Duncan, Rexroth, Miller, Leite, Woodcock, and
>>     others who are
>>     >> explicit about their anarchism and its influence on their
>>     style), but I
>>     >> can't help but see /The Revolt of Aphrodite/ through a
>>     perspective that
>>     >> asks about its implicit critique of corporatism and coercion in
>>     those
>>     >> terms. Certainly Durrell's vision isn't like Palahniuk's /Fight
>>     Club/,
>>     >> but there's something kindred. The state (Rome) falls,
>>     contracts end,
>>     >> law is obscured, yet the folks are in peace and accord, relying
>>     instead
>>     >> on their word and sociability.
>>     >>
>>     >> The "Tunc aut Nunquam" moment is also cast in unusual terms for
>>     Durrell:
>>     >>
>>     >> "Either everything will disintegrate, the Firm will begin to
>>     dissolve;
>>     >> or else nothing, Mr. Felix, absolutely nothing."
>>     >>
>>     >> The Zeno prophecy first appears on pages 231-2, and this Zeno
>>     is a Greek
>>     >> clerk who has visions (his vision is of the novel's ending and the
>>     >> destruction of coercion and obligation). However, I can't help
>>     but take
>>     >> the reference to Zeno (and can a Classicist on here correct me?!
>>     >> Bruce?) as potentially a gesture to Kropotkin's entry in the
>>     >> Encyclopaedia Britannics's 11th edition (same entry for
>>     Durrell's 14th
>>     >> edition? I know the 14th was based on the 11th edition):
>>     >>
>>     >> "The best exponent of anarchist philosophy in ancient Greece
>>     was Zeno
>>     >> [...] who distinctly opposed his conception of a free community
>>     without
>>     >> government to the state-utopia of Plato. He repudiated the
>>     omnipotence
>>     >> of the state, its intervention and regimentation, and
>>     proclaimed the
>>     >> sovereignty of the moral law of the individual -- remarking already
>>     >> that, while the necessary instinct of self-preservation leads
>>     man to
>>     >> egotism, nature has supplied a corrective to it by providing
>>     man with
>>     >> another instinct -- that of sociability. When men are
>>     reasonable enough
>>     >> to follow their natural instincts, they will unite across the
>>     frontiers
>>     >> and constitute the cosmos. They will have no need of law-courts or
>>     >> police, will have no temples and no public worship, and use no
>>     money --
>>     >> free gifts taking the place of the exchanges."
>>     >>
>>     >> I think Plutarch describes Zeno failing to kill the tyrant
>>     Demylus so
>>     >> that "with his own teeth bit off his tongue, he spit it in the
>>     tyrant?s
>>     >> face."
>>     >>
>>     >> I'm retracing some poetic networks that ran contrary to the Auden
>>     >> Generation, and most have an anarchist politics, so I may just
>>     have this
>>     >> in my head at the moment. Still, it seems like some anti-state or
>>     >> antiauthoritarian sentiments (which isn't so far from Durrell's
>>     open
>>     >> poetics) are present here.
>>     >>
>>     >> At any rate, those are the things that have been occupying my mind
>>     >> lately with /The Revolt of Aphrodite/... What say y'all?
>>     >>
>>     >> Best,
>>     >> James
>>     >>
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     ILDS mailing list
>>     ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 27
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 08:37:01 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] Names
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <286854BA-DB3C-48AB-94B5-222B370F4E16 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:286854BA-DB3C-48AB-94B5-222B370F4E16 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>>
>>     I would swear that it was. So much for memory.
>>
>>
>>     BR
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 29, 2011, at 12:03 AM, Richard Pine wrote:
>>
>>     > Wasn't me! RP
>>     >
>>     > From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     > To: Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au
>>     <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>>; ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     > Sent: Fri, January 28, 2011 11:20:13 PM
>>     > Subject: [ilds] Names
>>     >
>>     > Pursewarden. Sometime ago, R. Pine, I believe, pointed out that
>>     Ludwig's surname was a pun or allusion to the scrotum. Or maybe I
>>     just have a dirty mind. Bill Godshalk can confirm this, either
>>     way. The OED, however, cites "scrotum" as a Renaissance meaning of
>>     purse. Cf. Iago's "Who steals my purse steals trash," where
>>     "purse," given Iago's lewd mind, probably refers to more than coins.
>>     >
>>     > Mountolive. New Testament "Mount of Olives," associated with
>>     Christ's Passion and possibly the Garden of Gethsemane? Not clear
>>     how this applies to Sir David, unless you want to argue that in
>>     the Quartet the ambassador has his own Passion or passions to deal
>>     with. This may be Durrell being whimsical and irreverent. Still, a
>>     good name.
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > Bruce
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > On Jan 28, 2011, at 12:21 PM, Denise Tart & David Green wrote:
>>     >
>>     >> Meta,
>>     >>
>>     >> thanks for news about the Villa Cleobolus, sad though it is. I
>>     have been able to find Larry's other houses on Google Earth, but
>>     not the one in Rhodes. insidently, a Greek friend of mine reckons
>>     that Rhodes is the most beautiful island in the world which
>>     certainly comes through in the Marine Venus.
>>     >>
>>     >> To the names in Dark Labyrinth, yes the names imply the characters
>>     >>
>>     >> Graecen - the graceful and mannered lord.
>>     >> Campion - Champion, the hero of the piece - the shit stirring
>>     artist rebel type
>>     >> Fearmax - the enigmatic, withdrawn magician (maximum fear)
>>     >> The Truman's - true, honest ordinary people who achieve a
>>     mountain utopia (Durrell's hearkening back to his Indian Himalayan
>>     experiences)
>>     >>
>>     >> etc etc
>>     >>
>>     >> we recall in 18th century English Lit characters like Squire
>>     Booby (a booby being an ignorant boor) or squire Weston, he from
>>     the west country, a land of rowdy, drunken cider drinkers, the
>>     lord be good to them.
>>     >>
>>     >> I also wonder about Quartet characters - Pursewarden for
>>     example (money guard) or Mountolive - who was Olive???
>>     >>
>>     >> David Green
>>     >> Terra Australis Incognito
>>     >>
>>     >> From: Meta Cerar
>>     >> Sent: Friday, January 28, 2011 9:58 PM
>>     >> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >>
>>     >> Actually there are more ?18th century? names in the Dark
>>     Labyrinth, like TRUMAN for example. What an appropriate name for
>>     someone who ends up on the Roof of the World, which I agree is one
>>     of the most magnificent chapters in Durrell's entire opus, as one
>>     of the list members wrote recently.
>>     >>
>>     >> If anyone on the list knows of an article concerning the Cefalu
>>     or Dark Labyrinth names, I would be greatly interested. I am
>>     currently translating Dark Labyrinth into Slovenian ? to be
>>     published at the 100th anniversary of his birth (February 2012) ?
>>     and would love to include this symbolism into the preface of the book.
>>     >>
>>     >> I would also be grateful for any information on reviews or
>>     articles on this particular book, which I greatly enjoy working on
>>     although L.D. dismissed it as a potboiler. I think there was an
>>     article in Deus Loci about Otto Rank's influence on D.L. If anyone
>>     happens to be familiar with it, please let me know if it's worth
>>     reading.
>>     >>
>>     >> BTW, I loved the photos from Bellapais. What a great location
>>     for a future Durrell conference! I followed the Durrell trail
>>     throughout the Meditterranean but haven't been to Cyprus yet. The
>>     Villa Cleobolus and the ?Tree of idleness? in the old moslem
>>     graveyard in Rhodes are sadly neglected to my great disappointment.
>>     >>
>>     >> Looking forward to further commentaries on Dark Labyrinth,
>>     >>
>>     >> Meta Cerar,
>>     >> Slovenia
>>     >>
>>     >> From: ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     [mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds-bounces at lists.uvic.ca>] On Behalf Of Bruce Redwine
>>     >> Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 10:43 PM
>>     >> To: Denise Tart & David Green; ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >> Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >>
>>     >> Someone undoubtedly already has published an article on names
>>     in Cefalu, indeed throughout Durrell's fiction. My guess is that
>>     LD sometimes chose them as Shakespeare did his low-life
>>     characters: Mistress Quickly, Doll Tearsheet, Pistol, etc. People
>>     are their names. Doesn't Fearmax die of fright?
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> Bruce
>>     >>
>>     >> Sent from my iPhone
>>     >>
>>     >> On Jan 27, 2011, at 11:59 AM, "Denise Tart & David Green"
>>     <dtart at bigpond.net.au <mailto:dtart at bigpond.net.au>> wrote:
>>     >>
>>     >>> I especially recommend the early chapter in Tunc describing
>>     Caradoc's drunken speech in front of the Parthenon. Grove
>>     >>>
>>     >>> It is probably fitting that I make a detailed literary
>>     analysis of Caradoc's speech - already seeing Durrell's
>>     juxtaposition of northern Celtic Caradoc and the souther classical
>>     Parthenon.
>>     >>>
>>     >>> btw, has anyone studied Durrell's names? I was very intrigued
>>     by them when reading Dark Labyrinth recently; Fearmax, Graecen -
>>     there something 18th century about it.
>>     >>>
>>     >>> David
>>     >>>
>>     >>>
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>     -------------- next part --------------
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110129/47524b25/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 28
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:06:04 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Cc: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Message-ID: <BD0691BA-9E66-41A2-8A50-D13115EE0D9F at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:BD0691BA-9E66-41A2-8A50-D13115EE0D9F at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>>
>>     Thanks. Fascinating. He's plotting his literary future. Note the
>>     interest in space and time. The big interest in the Maya seems
>>     strange but probably has to do with their calendar and time. I
>>     haven't checked the 11th, but when the 11th and 14th were
>>     published, their code had not been broken into, and the Maya were
>>     thought to be peaceful and Arcadian. Perhaps a jungle version of
>>     the Roof of the World, if you will. After the glyphs were
>>     deciphered, along with extensive archaeology, it was discovered
>>     they were just the opposite ? highly warlike and bloodthirsty. Mel
>>     Gibson's Apocalypto is not far from the truth. It might be a good
>>     exercise for some energetic graduate student to read all these
>>     articles and then compare them with Durrell's oeuvre. Surely worth
>>     an article or two.
>>
>>
>>     Bruce
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Jan 29, 2011, at 12:18 AM, Richard Pine wrote:
>>
>>     > The articles in EB specifically marked by LD are:
>>     >
>>     > Abnormal Psychology
>>     > Abraxas
>>     > Almanac
>>     > Archimedes
>>     > Arrhenius
>>     > Asia
>>     > Astrology
>>     > Astronomy
>>     > Calendar
>>     > (Central America - May)
>>     > (Chronology - Maya)
>>     > Circle
>>     > Comparative Ethics
>>     > Confucius
>>     > Cone
>>     > Constellation
>>     > Cosmogony
>>     > Egypt
>>     > Equation of Time
>>     > Geodesy
>>     > Geometry (and Line Geometry)
>>     > Indian Philosophy
>>     > Infinity
>>     > Lhasa
>>     > Limit
>>     > Mayan Calendar
>>     > Mayan Culture
>>     > Menstruation
>>     > Nashe
>>     > Number & Numerals
>>     > Observatory
>>     > Palmistry
>>     > Ptolemy
>>     > Serpents
>>     > Sphere
>>     > Stoics
>>     > Zero
>>     > Tibet
>>     > Tides
>>     > Time
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > ----- Original Message ----
>>     > From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     > To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > Sent: Sat, January 29, 2011 12:50:12 AM
>>     > Subject: [ilds] Encyclopaedia Britannica 11th & 14th
>>     >
>>     > Hi Bruce,
>>     >
>>     > Peter Kropotkin wrote the "Anarchism" entry to the 11th edition
>>     in 1905
>>     > (Wilde even quotes Kropotkin, without reference, in "The Soul of Man
>>     > Under Socialism").
>>     >
>>     > As I understand it, the 14th edition (which Durrell had on
>>     Corfu) was
>>     > largely a reversion to the 11th edition that added new entries
>>     and made
>>     > cuts to existing entries. If you have access, I'd appreciate it!! I
>>     > can get it online through my library, but it doesn't allow the
>>     > comparison between past editions.
>>     >
>>     > I believe the DSC Library has the 14th edition on its shelves too.
>>     >
>>     > Thanks!
>>     > James
>>     >
>>     > On 28/01/11 2:38 PM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     >> James,
>>     >>
>>     >> Tell me which entry in the 11th ed. of /EB,/ I'll check it for you.
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> Bruce
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >> On Jan 28, 2011, at 1:21 PM, James Gifford wrote:
>>     >>
>>     >>> On 27/01/11 6:57 AM, gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>
>>     >>> <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>>
>>     wrote:
>>     >>>> And for those who haven't read Tunc and Nunquam, get busy!
>>     They're the
>>     >>>> most consistently underrated of Durrell's novels and deserve more
>>     >>>> attention. I'm not qualified to undertake a
>>     chapter-by-chapter analysis
>>     >>>> of them, but perhaps someone else could this summer.
>>     >>>
>>     >>> Do I sense another reading group coming on? I'd enjoy that,
>>     and Tunc
>>     >>> and Nunquam have been favourites of mine. Great suggestion, Grove!
>>     >>> Let's plan for it this summer.
>>     >>>
>>     >>> I'm of the (perhaps heretical) opinion that these are more
>>     political
>>     >>> works than they let on, and that they show much about
>>     Durrell's 1930s
>>     >>> and 40s activities that can otherwise be overlooked.
>>     >>>
>>     >>> Caradoc's speech is grand, but I'm always struck by the
>>     inexplicable
>>     >>> ending to /Nunquam/... I can't help but think of Durrell's
>>     publications
>>     >>> in the anarchist press (NOW, New Road, Experimental Review,
>>     the New
>>     >>> Apocalypse books, and so forth) and the ease with which an
>>     >>> antiauthoritarian interpretation of his poetics can be made.
>>     Add to
>>     >>> that mix the language of /Nunquam/'s last two pages 282-283 (law,
>>     >>> authority, command, contractual obligation, and the fall of
>>     the state):
>>     >>>
>>     >>> "which satisfied the law."
>>     >>>
>>     >>> "the prophecy of Zeno has been occupying me, preoccupying me
>>     very much.
>>     >>> Indeed I now feel it less as a prophecy than as a sort of command,
>>     >>> from myself to myself"
>>     >>>
>>     >>> "People will be afraid to take advantage of the fact that they
>>     have no
>>     >>> contractual obligations."
>>     >>>
>>     >>> "we have been dancing, dancing in complete happiness and
>>     accord.... even
>>     >>> though Rome burns."
>>     >>>
>>     >>> I may be just spotting things I'm looking for in other 1930s
>>     writers at
>>     >>> the moment (Duncan, Rexroth, Miller, Leite, Woodcock, and
>>     others who are
>>     >>> explicit about their anarchism and its influence on their
>>     style), but I
>>     >>> can't help but see /The Revolt of Aphrodite/ through a
>>     perspective that
>>     >>> asks about its implicit critique of corporatism and coercion
>>     in those
>>     >>> terms. Certainly Durrell's vision isn't like Palahniuk's
>>     /Fight Club/,
>>     >>> but there's something kindred. The state (Rome) falls,
>>     contracts end,
>>     >>> law is obscured, yet the folks are in peace and accord,
>>     relying instead
>>     >>> on their word and sociability.
>>     >>>
>>     >>> The "Tunc aut Nunquam" moment is also cast in unusual terms
>>     for Durrell:
>>     >>>
>>     >>> "Either everything will disintegrate, the Firm will begin to
>>     dissolve;
>>     >>> or else nothing, Mr. Felix, absolutely nothing."
>>     >>>
>>     >>> The Zeno prophecy first appears on pages 231-2, and this Zeno
>>     is a Greek
>>     >>> clerk who has visions (his vision is of the novel's ending and the
>>     >>> destruction of coercion and obligation). However, I can't help
>>     but take
>>     >>> the reference to Zeno (and can a Classicist on here correct me?!
>>     >>> Bruce?) as potentially a gesture to Kropotkin's entry in the
>>     >>> Encyclopaedia Britannics's 11th edition (same entry for
>>     Durrell's 14th
>>     >>> edition? I know the 14th was based on the 11th edition):
>>     >>>
>>     >>> "The best exponent of anarchist philosophy in ancient Greece
>>     was Zeno
>>     >>> [...] who distinctly opposed his conception of a free
>>     community without
>>     >>> government to the state-utopia of Plato. He repudiated the
>>     omnipotence
>>     >>> of the state, its intervention and regimentation, and
>>     proclaimed the
>>     >>> sovereignty of the moral law of the individual -- remarking
>>     already
>>     >>> that, while the necessary instinct of self-preservation leads
>>     man to
>>     >>> egotism, nature has supplied a corrective to it by providing
>>     man with
>>     >>> another instinct -- that of sociability. When men are
>>     reasonable enough
>>     >>> to follow their natural instincts, they will unite across the
>>     frontiers
>>     >>> and constitute the cosmos. They will have no need of law-courts or
>>     >>> police, will have no temples and no public worship, and use no
>>     money --
>>     >>> free gifts taking the place of the exchanges."
>>     >>>
>>     >>> I think Plutarch describes Zeno failing to kill the tyrant
>>     Demylus so
>>     >>> that "with his own teeth bit off his tongue, he spit it in the
>>     tyrant?s
>>     >>> face."
>>     >>>
>>     >>> I'm retracing some poetic networks that ran contrary to the Auden
>>     >>> Generation, and most have an anarchist politics, so I may just
>>     have this
>>     >>> in my head at the moment. Still, it seems like some anti-state or
>>     >>> antiauthoritarian sentiments (which isn't so far from
>>     Durrell's open
>>     >>> poetics) are present here.
>>     >>>
>>     >>> At any rate, those are the things that have been occupying my mind
>>     >>> lately with /The Revolt of Aphrodite/... What say y'all?
>>     >>>
>>     >>> Best,
>>     >>> James
>>
>>     -------------- next part --------------
>>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>>     URL:
>>     http://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/ilds/attachments/20110129/4bc4c895/attachment-0001.html
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 29
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 10:27:22 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: [ilds] the purse
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D445C0A.30904 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D445C0A.30904 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>>
>>     On 29/01/11 8:37 AM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     > I would swear that it was. So much for memory.
>>     >
>>     >> On Jan 29, 2011, at 12:03 AM, Richard Pine wrote:
>>     >>
>>     >> Wasn't me! RP
>>     >>
>>     >>> On 28/01/11 11:20:13 AM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     >>> *Pursewarden.*Sometime ago, R. Pine, I believe, pointed out that
>>     >>> Ludwig's surname was a pun or allusion to the scrotum. Or maybe I
>>     >>> just have a dirty mind. Bill Godshalk can confirm this
>>
>>     Alas, looking back at the listserv's records, I find that *I* said it:
>>     Fri, 9 Jul 2003 17:08:36 -0400. AJ French chimed in on this point as
>>     well, and Bruce showed much interest. My goodness we've been after
>>     those purse strings for a long time!
>>
>>     Still, "purse" was used by Elizabethans in this form, as Bill
>>     noted, and
>>     it appears in the OED with this association. I'm intrigued to note
>>     that
>>     the word "purse" occurs repeatedly in relation to the mouth in /Pied
>>     Piper/ and /Panic Spring/ (and no, not just pursing one's lips). I
>>     wonder if a collocation would turn up interesting patterns in this
>>     regard across Durrell's works over time.
>>
>>     Cheers,
>>     James
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 30
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 11:31:47 -0700 (GMT-07:00)
>>     From: gkoger at mindspring.com <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID:
>>     <24725023.1296325907489.JavaMail.root at elwamui-chisos.atl.sa.earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:24725023.1296325907489.JavaMail.root at elwamui-chisos.atl.sa.earthlink.net>>
>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>>
>>     James,
>>
>>     Thank you! Much, much to think about here. My own impression (my
>>     last reading was some time back) is that, as Durrell suggests, the
>>     Firm has always been with us. It's as if it has an existence in
>>     the DNA as well as in the external world. And I've always felt
>>     that the central situation isn't (to change the tense) now or
>>     never but now AND never. Aren't the books all about contradictions?
>>
>>     Rereading may change my perceptions entirely, so a group approach
>>     would be another reason to look forward to summer!
>>
>>     Grove
>>
>>
>>     -----Original Message-----
>>     >From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     >Sent: Jan 28, 2011 2:21 PM
>>     >To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     >
>>     >On 27/01/11 6:57 AM, gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com> wrote:
>>     >> And for those who haven't read Tunc and Nunquam, get busy!
>>     They're the
>>     >> most consistently underrated of Durrell's novels and deserve more
>>     >> attention. I'm not qualified to undertake a chapter-by-chapter
>>     analysis
>>     >> of them, but perhaps someone else could this summer.
>>     >
>>     >Do I sense another reading group coming on? I'd enjoy that, and Tunc
>>     >and Nunquam have been favourites of mine. Great suggestion, Grove!
>>     >Let's plan for it this summer.
>>     >
>>     >I'm of the (perhaps heretical) opinion that these are more political
>>     >works than they let on, and that they show much about Durrell's 1930s
>>     >and 40s activities that can otherwise be overlooked.
>>     >
>>     >Caradoc's speech is grand, but I'm always struck by the inexplicable
>>     >ending to /Nunquam/... I can't help but think of Durrell's
>>     publications
>>     >in the anarchist press (NOW, New Road, Experimental Review, the New
>>     >Apocalypse books, and so forth) and the ease with which an
>>     >antiauthoritarian interpretation of his poetics can be made. Add to
>>     >that mix the language of /Nunquam/'s last two pages 282-283 (law,
>>     >authority, command, contractual obligation, and the fall of the
>>     state):
>>     >
>>     >"which satisfied the law."
>>     >
>>     >"the prophecy of Zeno has been occupying me, preoccupying me very
>>     much.
>>     > Indeed I now feel it less as a prophecy than as a sort of command,
>>     >from myself to myself"
>>     >
>>     >"People will be afraid to take advantage of the fact that they
>>     have no
>>     >contractual obligations."
>>     >
>>     >"we have been dancing, dancing in complete happiness and
>>     accord.... even
>>     >though Rome burns."
>>     >
>>     >I may be just spotting things I'm looking for in other 1930s
>>     writers at
>>     >the moment (Duncan, Rexroth, Miller, Leite, Woodcock, and others
>>     who are
>>     >explicit about their anarchism and its influence on their style),
>>     but I
>>     >can't help but see /The Revolt of Aphrodite/ through a
>>     perspective that
>>     >asks about its implicit critique of corporatism and coercion in those
>>     >terms. Certainly Durrell's vision isn't like Palahniuk's /Fight
>>     Club/,
>>     >but there's something kindred. The state (Rome) falls, contracts end,
>>     >law is obscured, yet the folks are in peace and accord, relying
>>     instead
>>     >on their word and sociability.
>>     >
>>     >The "Tunc aut Nunquam" moment is also cast in unusual terms for
>>     Durrell:
>>     >
>>     >"Either everything will disintegrate, the Firm will begin to
>>     dissolve;
>>     >or else nothing, Mr. Felix, absolutely nothing."
>>     >
>>     >The Zeno prophecy first appears on pages 231-2, and this Zeno is
>>     a Greek
>>     >clerk who has visions (his vision is of the novel's ending and the
>>     >destruction of coercion and obligation). However, I can't help
>>     but take
>>     >the reference to Zeno (and can a Classicist on here correct me?!
>>     >Bruce?) as potentially a gesture to Kropotkin's entry in the
>>     >Encyclopaedia Britannics's 11th edition (same entry for Durrell's
>>     14th
>>     >edition? I know the 14th was based on the 11th edition):
>>     >
>>     >"The best exponent of anarchist philosophy in ancient Greece was Zeno
>>     >[...] who distinctly opposed his conception of a free community
>>     without
>>     >government to the state-utopia of Plato. He repudiated the
>>     omnipotence
>>     >of the state, its intervention and regimentation, and proclaimed the
>>     >sovereignty of the moral law of the individual -- remarking already
>>     >that, while the necessary instinct of self-preservation leads man to
>>     >egotism, nature has supplied a corrective to it by providing man with
>>     >another instinct -- that of sociability. When men are reasonable
>>     enough
>>     >to follow their natural instincts, they will unite across the
>>     frontiers
>>     >and constitute the cosmos. They will have no need of law-courts or
>>     >police, will have no temples and no public worship, and use no
>>     money --
>>     >free gifts taking the place of the exchanges."
>>     >
>>     >I think Plutarch describes Zeno failing to kill the tyrant Demylus so
>>     >that "with his own teeth bit off his tongue, he spit it in the
>>     tyrant?s
>>     >face."
>>     >
>>     >I'm retracing some poetic networks that ran contrary to the Auden
>>     >Generation, and most have an anarchist politics, so I may just
>>     have this
>>     >in my head at the moment. Still, it seems like some anti-state or
>>     >antiauthoritarian sentiments (which isn't so far from Durrell's open
>>     >poetics) are present here.
>>     >
>>     >At any rate, those are the things that have been occupying my mind
>>     >lately with /The Revolt of Aphrodite/... What say y'all?
>>     >
>>     >Best,
>>     >James
>>     >_______________________________________________
>>     >ILDS mailing list
>>     >ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     >https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 31
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 11:29:21 -0800
>>     From: James Gifford <james.d.gifford at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] What has happened to the ilds list
>>     To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     Message-ID: <4D446A91.4070105 at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:4D446A91.4070105 at gmail.com>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed
>>
>>     Hi Grove,
>>
>>     Let's consider this an aim for late April/May? Unless, of course,
>>     there's a chorus from the listserv to get started right away...
>>
>>     I'd agree about the Firm being more than simply a modern
>>     institution in
>>     the books -- I suppose my curiosity relates to the potential for LD to
>>     be talking about coercive authority in that 1968 moment (which Don
>>     Kacz
>>     has noted before). Just what *is* the Firm?
>>
>>     I'm in the midst of a long project relating to poetry networks in the
>>     1930s and 40s that differ from the High Modernists and Auden group by
>>     virtue of antiauthoritarian politics (or Herbert Read's politics
>>     of the
>>     unpolitical), and Durrell's in there though he's peripheral. That is
>>     certainly shaping my readerly perspective at the moment {winks eye at
>>     Bruce}, but it seems surprisingly easy to develop that perspective.
>>
>>     Cheers,
>>     James
>>
>>     On 29/01/11 10:31 AM, gkoger at mindspring.com
>>     <mailto:gkoger at mindspring.com> wrote:
>>     > James,
>>     >
>>     > Thank you! Much, much to think about here. My own impression (my
>>     last
>>     > reading was some time back) is that, as Durrell suggests, the Firm
>>     > has always been with us. It's as if it has an existence in the
>>     DNA as
>>     > well as in the external world. And I've always felt that the central
>>     > situation isn't (to change the tense) now or never but now AND
>>     never.
>>     > Aren't the books all about contradictions?
>>     >
>>     > Rereading may change my perceptions entirely, so a group approach
>>     > would be another reason to look forward to summer!
>>     >
>>     > Grove
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     Message: 32
>>     Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 11:28:48 -0800
>>     From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Subject: Re: [ilds] the purse
>>     To: "gifford at fdu.edu <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>" <gifford at fdu.edu
>>     <mailto:gifford at fdu.edu>>, "ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>     <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>"
>>     <ilds at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ilds at lists.uvic.ca>>
>>     Message-ID: <47962E6D-0472-4501-BB18-850ACBFA72D2 at earthlink.net
>>     <mailto:47962E6D-0472-4501-BB18-850ACBFA72D2 at earthlink.net>>
>>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>>
>>     Congratulations! RP did provide, I believe, an interesting
>>     etymology for Cunegonde, not of the "Candide" variety. So at least
>>     three of us have dirty minds. Durrell does encourage this kind of
>>     research. I wonder if the women on this List would consider that
>>     misogyny or would dismiss it as male infantile behavior.
>>
>>     BR
>>
>>
>>
>>     Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>     On Jan 29, 2011, at 10:27 AM, James Gifford
>>     <james.d.gifford at gmail.com <mailto:james.d.gifford at gmail.com>> wrote:
>>
>>     > On 29/01/11 8:37 AM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     >> I would swear that it was. So much for memory.
>>     >>
>>     >>> On Jan 29, 2011, at 12:03 AM, Richard Pine wrote:
>>     >>>
>>     >>> Wasn't me! RP
>>     >>>
>>     >>>> On 28/01/11 11:20:13 AM, Bruce Redwine wrote:
>>     >>>> *Pursewarden.*Sometime ago, R. Pine, I believe, pointed out that
>>     >>>> Ludwig's surname was a pun or allusion to the scrotum. Or maybe I
>>     >>>> just have a dirty mind. Bill Godshalk can confirm this
>>     >
>>     > Alas, looking back at the listserv's records, I find that *I*
>>     said it:
>>     > Fri, 9 Jul 2003 17:08:36 -0400. AJ French chimed in on this point as
>>     > well, and Bruce showed much interest. My goodness we've been after
>>     > those purse strings for a long time!
>>     >
>>     > Still, "purse" was used by Elizabethans in this form, as Bill
>>     noted, and
>>     > it appears in the OED with this association. I'm intrigued to
>>     note that
>>     > the word "purse" occurs repeatedly in relation to the mouth in /Pied
>>     > Piper/ and /Panic Spring/ (and no, not just pursing one's lips). I
>>     > wonder if a collocation would turn up interesting patterns in this
>>     > regard across Durrell's works over time.
>>     >
>>     > Cheers,
>>     > James
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > ILDS mailing list
>>     > ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     > https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------
>>
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     ILDS mailing list
>>     ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>     End of ILDS Digest, Vol 46, Issue 13
>>     ************************************
>>
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     ILDS mailing list
>>     ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>>     https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> -----------------------------------------------
>> "...but why is the rum gone?!?!"
>> _______________________________________________
>> ILDS mailing list
>> ILDS at lists.uvic.ca <mailto:ILDS at lists.uvic.ca>
>> https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/ilds
>
>
>
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