[ilds] regarding 'roman-gigogne'

Marc Piel marcpiel at interdesign.fr
Sat Oct 24 05:27:52 PDT 2009


The word Gigogne (as a noun) comes from a play 
written in 1602 with a large woman out of who's 
skirts came a multitude of children. Balzac wrote 
of a "mère gigogne" with many children.
As an adjective it is used today for furniture 
composed of  a series of tables that fit into each 
other. Idem for beds. So novels that flow out of 
each other.
BR
Marc

gkoger at mindspring.com a écrit :
> Jacob,
> 
> I believe that Blanford is talking about a "nesting" sequence of novels in which one can be pulled out of another. Durrell uses the same term in a letter to Henry Miller, saying that "Livia is the second in my huge roman gigogne." In another letter he refers to the sequence as "this cats cradle, roman-gigogne." 
> 
> Grove
> 
> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Jacob Riley <jtriley at unca.edu>
>> Sent: Oct 21, 2009 11:34 AM
>> To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>> Subject: [ilds] regarding 'roman-gigogne'
>>
>> can someone help me out with the translation of the phrase
>> "roman-gigogne' in Durrell's Livia? I'm looking at translations and
>> its saying "pull-out bed" or something. What is Blanford getting at
>> here? Its on page 11 in my Penguin edition. Thanks,
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