[ilds] [Fwd: moral economy in durrell's writings]

Charles Sligh Charles-Sligh at utc.edu
Wed May 13 05:58:12 PDT 2009


My understanding tends to use the moral economy of the /Alexandria Quartet/ as 
the measure. 

However, I would want to underscore that Durrell's interest or 
disinterest in moral questions does not seem to me to be static or 
uniform throughout his career and across the various genres. 

Also, for the earlier works, you might use an anxiety of influence approach to map out Durrell's changing moral views.

Jamie has said some interesting things of late about Durrell aping and then escaping Eliot and Miller--two writers whose moral perspectives deeply inform Durrell's own.

Check, and check again would be my rule.  But then I have read too much Matthew 
Arnold and Walter Pater (and, yes, Lawrence Durrell) to trust stereotypes and first impressions. . . .

For a non-/Quartet/ example, let us consider the moral universe of 
/some/ of the poetry.   In a way, Durrell's "Elegy on the Closing of the 
French Brothels" is a moral commentary.  In a similar fashion, consider 
"A Ballad of the Good Lord Nelson." 

Of course, the moral perspective comes from the view of an arch 
Ironist--the titles of these two give away Durrell's perspective.   He 
measures Pudding Island by his English reader's discomfort with "French 
topics" and ironic heroes ("Nelson stylites in Trafalgar Square Reminds 
the British what once they were").  

Charles

-- 
********************************************
Charles L. Sligh
Assistant Professor
Department of English
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
charles-sligh at utc.edu
********************************************




-- 
********************************************
Charles L. Sligh
Assistant Professor
Department of English
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
charles-sligh at utc.edu
********************************************



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