[ilds] Kafka and Durrell

Bruce Redwine bredwine1968 at earthlink.net
Mon Jul 23 10:04:08 PDT 2007


Richard Pine asks why I consider Kafka incomprehensible and baffling.  A short answer, in a Durrellian context.  Kafka is not incomprehensible (I didn't say he was); in fact, his Czech German is quite lucid and a delight to read.  What's baffling is his subject matter, in particular parts of The Trial (the famous, "Before the Law") and the entirety of The Castle.  He writes in mysterious parables about an incomprehensible social and cosmic order.  This is not Durrell, whose odd English cannot match the clarity of Kafka's German.  Durrell seems to be using language as a smokescreen to hide something.  Kafka sees a smokescreen, which language cannot penetrate.

Bruce

-----Original Message-----
>From: Bruce Redwine <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
>Sent: Jul 22, 2007 7:49 PM
>To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>Subject: Re: [ilds] John Press and Durrell
>
>Which poses an interesting problem.  If the poems are intended to be at least in part incomprehensible, who will read them?  The poet is destroying his own audience.  I'm trying to think of antecedents for this.  Perhaps Kafka?  Who published almost nothing and wrote mainly for his own satisfaction and amusement?  And we all know how baffling Kafka is -- and how great.
>
>Bruce
>
>-----Original Message-----
>>From: Michael Haag <michaelhaag at btinternet.com>
>>Sent: Jul 22, 2007 6:25 PM
>>To: ilds at lists.uvic.ca
>>Subject: Re: [ilds] John Press and Durrell
>>
>>
>>Like it or not, Durrell may not want readers seeing too much into his 
>>poems.
>>
>>:Michael
>>
>>
>>On Monday, July 23, 2007, at 01:14  am, william godshalk wrote:
>>
>>>  "At times, his vision is so private that, lacking the key, we find 
>>> ourselves unable to decipher the vivid cryptograms which lie before 
>>> us."



More information about the ILDS mailing list